Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEiffel Tower
IN THE NEWS

Eiffel Tower

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
A 13-story structure pitched as Baltimore's Eiffel Tower and a 200-foot-tall Ferris wheel could rewrite the skyline of downtown Baltimore if either is approved by city officials for the Inner Harbor waterfront. The city and the Baltimore Development Corp., its quasi-public development arm, released details this week of nine proposals received last month from companies in the United States and Europe. One or more of the proposed attractions could be installed as part of a city plan to provide family-friendly entertainment along the downtown waterfront.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
On a sun-splashed afternoon that marked the second day of summer, I joined a diverse throng of men, women and children, all waiting to board the Staten Island Ferry - a hulking orange vessel that provides free commuter service between Manhattan and its neighboring borough about five miles to the south. But many on the boat were tourists headed out for a glimpse of the Statue of Liberty, scheduled to reopen July 4 after being closed to visitors for more than eight months. As uniformed crews readied the nearly 300-foot-long John F. Kennedy for the 25-minute excursion, watercolor skies and wispy clouds framed the city's renowned skyline, and soft breezes enveloped New York Harbor.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 31, 2009
Fred Shoken, a Baltimore preservationist and planner, wrote to me several weeks ago after I had written a piece about Roland Park author Jill Jonnes' new book on the building of the Eiffel Tower. "I was disappointed that it made no mention of Baltimore's little-known, if not spurious connection, to the landmark structure," he wrote. What Shoken was talking about were 1894 newspaper accounts stating that Baltimore capitalists had purchased the Eiffel Tower and were planning to have it dismantled and re-erected in Clifton Park to celebrate Baltimore's centennial in 1897.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
A 13-story structure pitched as Baltimore's Eiffel Tower and a 200-foot-tall Ferris wheel could rewrite the skyline of downtown Baltimore if either is approved by city officials for the Inner Harbor waterfront. The city and the Baltimore Development Corp., its quasi-public development arm, released details this week of nine proposals received last month from companies in the United States and Europe. One or more of the proposed attractions could be installed as part of a city plan to provide family-friendly entertainment along the downtown waterfront.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 3, 2000
A MONDAY morning 2 cents' worth on Friday night's multibillion-dollar, century-ending, century-beginning, lusciously overwrought, globally televised celebrations. Best of Show: Fireworks on the Eiffel Tower. (The French thereby defeating the British in the New Year's Eve we're-not-a-has-been country effort.) Runner-up: Fireworks on the Washington Monument. Worst of Show: Tom Jones singing "It's Not Unusual" at "America's Millennium Gala" in front of the Lincoln Memorial. Runners-up: Hasn't-beens Kris Kristofferson and Don McLean trying to sing, respectively and not very well, "The Weight" and "American Pie" in front of the Lincoln Memorial.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | April 26, 2009
It had been four long years and 73 days since the French tricolor was lowered from the Eiffel Tower on June 13, 1940. That was the day German forces marched into the City of Light. Liberation followed by jubilation finally came on Aug. 25, 1944, when American forces and the French 2nd Armored Division entered Paris, forcing Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz to surrender. "I had thought that for me there would never again be any elation in war. But I had reckoned without the liberation of Paris," wrote Ernie Pyle, the Scripps-Howard war correspondent, who rode with the American troops.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE AND SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
The Eiffel Tower, a symbol of Paris and Europe's most recognized monument, caught fire yesterday evening, with flames breaking out just below the antenna, in a room filled with television and radio cables. A similar fire there in 1956 destroyed the top of the tower, which was built by Gustave Eiffel for the World's Fair of 1889. Yesterday's fire was extinguished in less than an hour. (Article, 8A) SOURCES: "Gustave Eiffel" by Henri Loyrette, World Book, Official Eiffel Tower Web site, www.tour-fr/teiffel/uk/: "The Tallest Tower," by Joseph Harriss.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 2006
You'd think a place called City Crepes would have a French vibe -- maybe some Maurice Chevalier tunes, some posters of the Eiffel Tower or the Champs-Elysees. But the city evoked in City Crepes isn't Paris at all, it's Baltimore, and most particularly Federal Hill. Fair or uneven:** Poor:*
TRAVEL
June 8, 2008
This photo was taken in Paris at the Eiffel Tower last November. It was a cold night, but you hardly think about the weather when confronted with the beauty of this monument, not to mention the city itself. Marco A. Padro Perry Hall The Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be individually acknowledged or returned, and upon submission become the property of The Sun. Write to: Travel Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail Travel@baltsun.
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | April 2, 2006
We'd like recommendations for the most romantic restaurants in Paris where we can take our kids to celebrate our 10th wedding anniversary. What about the restaurant in the Eiffel Tower? Le Jules Verne restaurant, on the second level of the Eiffel Tower, has more than just great views. It earned a one-star rating from the Michelin Guide and gets relatively high marks from survey participants in the Zagat Survey (zagat.com) - the classic French cuisine was called "magnifique" by one. But it's not cheap: You can expect to pay about 107 euros per person (that's $127)
NEWS
November 18, 2010
Oh please! Please tell me that Baltimore's version of the Eiffel Tower is just a post-Halloween trick ("Baltimore's own Eiffel Tower? Nov. 18). It will not do for the city "what the Arch does in St. Louis," as the developer stated. The Arch is a graceful, dignified welcoming point to the West. This proposed sculpture, on the other hand calls to mind crossed swords, and broken ones at that. I cannot see it comparing favorably with Paris and St. Louis. The Male-Female monstrosity at Penn Station, maybe.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
Paris has the Eiffel Tower. St. Louis has the Gateway Arch. And Baltimore could soon have a monumental work of art if developer Pat Turner is successful in his quest to place a 236-foot-tall illuminated metal sculpture on the Middle Branch waterfront as a focal point of his $1.5 billion Westport development. During a meeting of Baltimore's Public Art Commission on Wednesday, Turner unveiled plans showing how the untitled sculpture, by Tennessee artist John Henry, would be placed within a traffic circle on one of the major roads planned for the Westport development.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | December 13, 2009
'Paris Postcards: The Golden Age' Counterpoint, $24.95: For many years they were taken for granted, but to author and collector Leonard Pitt, hand-painted French postcards from the late 19th and early 20th centuries are "little works of art." They also serve as historical documents. In this gorgeous collection, Pitt has chosen postcards that show a Paris that no longer exists. The postcard, he writes, "revolutionized communication and created the first form of social networking equivalent to today's e-mail."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 31, 2009
Fred Shoken, a Baltimore preservationist and planner, wrote to me several weeks ago after I had written a piece about Roland Park author Jill Jonnes' new book on the building of the Eiffel Tower. "I was disappointed that it made no mention of Baltimore's little-known, if not spurious connection, to the landmark structure," he wrote. What Shoken was talking about were 1894 newspaper accounts stating that Baltimore capitalists had purchased the Eiffel Tower and were planning to have it dismantled and re-erected in Clifton Park to celebrate Baltimore's centennial in 1897.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
We'll always have Paris," Humphrey Bogart famously said in Casablanca . Roland Park author and historian Jill Jonnes recalled her first visit in the 1960s to the Eiffel Tower, the enduring 1,000-foot-tall Parisian landmark that was the centerpiece of the 1889 World's Fair. Jonnes was living at the time with her family in Paris, where her father, an economist, worked for the U.S. Agency for International Development. "I was 6 or 7, and walking down those steps, you go round and round and round.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | April 26, 2009
It had been four long years and 73 days since the French tricolor was lowered from the Eiffel Tower on June 13, 1940. That was the day German forces marched into the City of Light. Liberation followed by jubilation finally came on Aug. 25, 1944, when American forces and the French 2nd Armored Division entered Paris, forcing Gen. Dietrich von Choltitz to surrender. "I had thought that for me there would never again be any elation in war. But I had reckoned without the liberation of Paris," wrote Ernie Pyle, the Scripps-Howard war correspondent, who rode with the American troops.
TRAVEL
By June Sawyers and June Sawyers,Tribune Newspapers | December 13, 2009
'Paris Postcards: The Golden Age' Counterpoint, $24.95: For many years they were taken for granted, but to author and collector Leonard Pitt, hand-painted French postcards from the late 19th and early 20th centuries are "little works of art." They also serve as historical documents. In this gorgeous collection, Pitt has chosen postcards that show a Paris that no longer exists. The postcard, he writes, "revolutionized communication and created the first form of social networking equivalent to today's e-mail."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.