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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Four decades after they were written in prison, the memoirs of Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi official who oversaw Hitler's drive to exterminate Europe's Jews, were made public yesterday. The document, handwritten in German on 1,300 lined pages, provides horrid first-hand descriptions of the mass murder Eichmann directed as head of the Gestapo's Department of Jewish Affairs. It also minimizes his role in what he calls "humanity's biggest crime". Several Israelis who had gained previous access to the memoirs said yesterday that they offered little that was new to historians, because much of what Eichmann wrote could be found in evidence offered at his 1961 trial after Israeli agents tracked him down in Argentina.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 17, 2014
Hannah Arendt coined the term "the banality of evil" to describe the galling normalcy of Nazi mass murderer Adolf Eichmann. Covering his trial in Jerusalem, she described Eichmann as less a cartoonish villain than a dull, remorseless, paper-pushing functionary just "doing his job. " The phrase "banality of evil" was instantly controversial, largely because it was misunderstood. Ms. Arendt was not trying to minimize Nazism's evil, but to capture its enormity. The staggering moral horror of the Holocaust was that it made complicity "normal.
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SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan and Tara Finnegan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 1997
PISCATAWAY, N.J. -- The 2,295 spectators at Rutgers University's Yurcak Field aren't going to forget the ending of this one anytime soon.The Maryland men's soccer team held a one-goal lead going into the final minutes of play, when Rutgers freshman Brett Lasby took the ball into the penalty box. Maryland senior back Leo Cullen went after the ball and Lasby went down as it went out of bounds behind the end line with 1: 20 remaining.The partisan crowd expected referee Robert Sheeker to call for a penalty kick, but no whistle was blown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
Watching "Eichmann" on Holocaust Remembrance Day in the Baltimore Jewish Film Festival will remind viewers of the power movies can get from timing and circumstance. It's not a crackerjack film, but it's a strong conversation-starter. (Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin will be the guest speaker.) It centers on an Israeli police interrogator, Capt. Avner Less, who relentlessly questioned Adolph Eichmann, a prime engineer of Hitler's Final Solution, from May 29, 1960 (shortly after Eichmann's capture in a Buenos Aires suburb)
NEWS
February 19, 2003
Isser Harel, 91, an Israeli spymaster who directed the capture of Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann in 1960, died Tuesday in a hospital near Tel Aviv. Mr. Harel was one of the founders of Mossad -- an intelligence agency that achieved international renown -- and served as its head from 1952 to 1963. He was also the first director of the Shin Bet internal security agency. One of the tasks of the Mossad in its first years was to track down leaders of the Nazi regime responsible for the killing of 6 million Jews in the Holocaust of World War II. A prime target was Eichmann, Adolf Hitler's top aide, responsible for implementing what the Nazis called the "final solution" -- the murder of all the Jews in Europe.
FEATURES
May 31, 2004
May 31 1889: More than 2,000 people perished when a dam break sent water rushing through Johnstown, Pa. 1962: World War II Gestapo official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel for his role in the Nazi Holocaust. 1977: The trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making, was completed. 1989: House Speaker Jim Wright, dogged by questions about his ethics, announced he would resign. 1991: Leaders of Angola's two warring factions signed a peace treaty, ending a 16-year-old civil war.
FEATURES
May 23, 2001
In 1430, Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians, who sold her to the English. In 1533, the marriage of England's King Henry VIII to Catherine of Aragon was declared null and void. In 1701, Captain William Kidd was hanged in London after he was convicted of piracy and murder. In 1788, South Carolina became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1915, Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary in World War I. In 1934, bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were shot to death in a police ambush in Bienville Parish, La. In 1937, industrialist John D. Rockefeller died in Ormond Beach, Fla. In 1940, Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra, the Pied Pipers and featured soloist Frank Sinatra recorded "I'll Never Smile Again" in New York for RCA. In 1945, Nazi official Heinrich Himmler committed suicide while imprisoned in Luneburg, Germany.
NEWS
By Abe Novick | April 10, 2001
WHEN TIMOTHY McVeigh looks up on May 16, expecting to see a group of relatives of the victims he blew up, what if no one would be there staring back at him? And what if there wouldn't be any cameras filming the lethal injection, either -- just him alone with his executioner and the required legal witnesses? No audience. No reality TV. No ratings. No hype. If we make a spectacle of someone's death, there is a part of it that smacks of retribution. We become the hateful. The victims' relatives want to see him die, and it's understandable.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
Gideon Hausner, 75, who prosecuted Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann as Israeli attorney general, died Thursday in Jerusalem. He had been hospitalized for the past three months in Jerusalem, but his family declined to give the cause of death. Mr. Hausner became a world figure during the 1961-1962 trial, which ended with Eichmann's conviction and hanging for his role in murdering millions of Jews. Mr. Hausner later became chairman of Yad Vashem, the national monument and documentation center of the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 17, 2014
Hannah Arendt coined the term "the banality of evil" to describe the galling normalcy of Nazi mass murderer Adolf Eichmann. Covering his trial in Jerusalem, she described Eichmann as less a cartoonish villain than a dull, remorseless, paper-pushing functionary just "doing his job. " The phrase "banality of evil" was instantly controversial, largely because it was misunderstood. Ms. Arendt was not trying to minimize Nazism's evil, but to capture its enormity. The staggering moral horror of the Holocaust was that it made complicity "normal.
FEATURES
May 31, 2004
May 31 1889: More than 2,000 people perished when a dam break sent water rushing through Johnstown, Pa. 1962: World War II Gestapo official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel for his role in the Nazi Holocaust. 1977: The trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making, was completed. 1989: House Speaker Jim Wright, dogged by questions about his ethics, announced he would resign. 1991: Leaders of Angola's two warring factions signed a peace treaty, ending a 16-year-old civil war.
NEWS
February 19, 2003
Isser Harel, 91, an Israeli spymaster who directed the capture of Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann in 1960, died Tuesday in a hospital near Tel Aviv. Mr. Harel was one of the founders of Mossad -- an intelligence agency that achieved international renown -- and served as its head from 1952 to 1963. He was also the first director of the Shin Bet internal security agency. One of the tasks of the Mossad in its first years was to track down leaders of the Nazi regime responsible for the killing of 6 million Jews in the Holocaust of World War II. A prime target was Eichmann, Adolf Hitler's top aide, responsible for implementing what the Nazis called the "final solution" -- the murder of all the Jews in Europe.
FEATURES
May 23, 2001
In 1430, Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians, who sold her to the English. In 1533, the marriage of England's King Henry VIII to Catherine of Aragon was declared null and void. In 1701, Captain William Kidd was hanged in London after he was convicted of piracy and murder. In 1788, South Carolina became the eighth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1915, Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary in World War I. In 1934, bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were shot to death in a police ambush in Bienville Parish, La. In 1937, industrialist John D. Rockefeller died in Ormond Beach, Fla. In 1940, Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra, the Pied Pipers and featured soloist Frank Sinatra recorded "I'll Never Smile Again" in New York for RCA. In 1945, Nazi official Heinrich Himmler committed suicide while imprisoned in Luneburg, Germany.
NEWS
By Abe Novick | April 10, 2001
WHEN TIMOTHY McVeigh looks up on May 16, expecting to see a group of relatives of the victims he blew up, what if no one would be there staring back at him? And what if there wouldn't be any cameras filming the lethal injection, either -- just him alone with his executioner and the required legal witnesses? No audience. No reality TV. No ratings. No hype. If we make a spectacle of someone's death, there is a part of it that smacks of retribution. We become the hateful. The victims' relatives want to see him die, and it's understandable.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Four decades after they were written in prison, the memoirs of Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi official who oversaw Hitler's drive to exterminate Europe's Jews, were made public yesterday. The document, handwritten in German on 1,300 lined pages, provides horrid first-hand descriptions of the mass murder Eichmann directed as head of the Gestapo's Department of Jewish Affairs. It also minimizes his role in what he calls "humanity's biggest crime". Several Israelis who had gained previous access to the memoirs said yesterday that they offered little that was new to historians, because much of what Eichmann wrote could be found in evidence offered at his 1961 trial after Israeli agents tracked him down in Argentina.
SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan and Tara Finnegan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 1997
PISCATAWAY, N.J. -- The 2,295 spectators at Rutgers University's Yurcak Field aren't going to forget the ending of this one anytime soon.The Maryland men's soccer team held a one-goal lead going into the final minutes of play, when Rutgers freshman Brett Lasby took the ball into the penalty box. Maryland senior back Leo Cullen went after the ball and Lasby went down as it went out of bounds behind the end line with 1: 20 remaining.The partisan crowd expected referee Robert Sheeker to call for a penalty kick, but no whistle was blown.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 22, 1992
This is the story of a recent trip to the emergency room where I arrived, unfortunately, without a large harpoon imbedded in my chest.I say "unfortunately" because if you arrive in the ER with a large harpoon imbedded in your chest, there is at least a chance that you'll be treated within the next several hours and sent on your way -- assuming you can get very far with that sort of injury.Otherwise, the odds are that you'll languish in a stiff-backed plastic chair for a long time, moaning and thumbing through an old People profile of Cher until a bored nurse calls your name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
Watching "Eichmann" on Holocaust Remembrance Day in the Baltimore Jewish Film Festival will remind viewers of the power movies can get from timing and circumstance. It's not a crackerjack film, but it's a strong conversation-starter. (Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin will be the guest speaker.) It centers on an Israeli police interrogator, Capt. Avner Less, who relentlessly questioned Adolph Eichmann, a prime engineer of Hitler's Final Solution, from May 29, 1960 (shortly after Eichmann's capture in a Buenos Aires suburb)
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 22, 1992
This is the story of a recent trip to the emergency room where I arrived, unfortunately, without a large harpoon imbedded in my chest.I say "unfortunately" because if you arrive in the ER with a large harpoon imbedded in your chest, there is at least a chance that you'll be treated within the next several hours and sent on your way -- assuming you can get very far with that sort of injury.Otherwise, the odds are that you'll languish in a stiff-backed plastic chair for a long time, moaning and thumbing through an old People profile of Cher until a bored nurse calls your name.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
Gideon Hausner, 75, who prosecuted Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann as Israeli attorney general, died Thursday in Jerusalem. He had been hospitalized for the past three months in Jerusalem, but his family declined to give the cause of death. Mr. Hausner became a world figure during the 1961-1962 trial, which ended with Eichmann's conviction and hanging for his role in murdering millions of Jews. Mr. Hausner later became chairman of Yad Vashem, the national monument and documentation center of the Holocaust.
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