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Ehud Olmert

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NEWS
June 4, 2008
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's visit to Washington gives him something to talk about besides cash-filled envelopes from an American Jewish businessman. His expected meeting today at the White House provides an opportunity for Mr. Olmert to act as a statesman and leave behind the allegations of political corruption that have preoccupied Jerusalem. He can focus on peace talks, not suspected illegal campaign contributions. It's a momentary reprieve because Mr. Olmert's political troubles are sure to preoccupy him when he returns to Israel and could force him out of office before an agreement with the Palestinians is reached.
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NEWS
June 4, 2008
Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's visit to Washington gives him something to talk about besides cash-filled envelopes from an American Jewish businessman. His expected meeting today at the White House provides an opportunity for Mr. Olmert to act as a statesman and leave behind the allegations of political corruption that have preoccupied Jerusalem. He can focus on peace talks, not suspected illegal campaign contributions. It's a momentary reprieve because Mr. Olmert's political troubles are sure to preoccupy him when he returns to Israel and could force him out of office before an agreement with the Palestinians is reached.
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NEWS
June 28, 2001
Jerusalem Mayor Ehud Olmert, a member of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's Likud bloc, spoke recently at The Sun with Richard C. Gross, editor of the Opinion * Commentary page, about the current conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. They spoke before the current U.S.-brokered cease-fire. How long do you think the situation will continue in Israel ? I wish it would be much shorter. But analyzing the basic approach of the Palestinian leadership and the unwillingness of [Palestinian leader Yasser]
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 29, 2008
JERUSALEM - The political noose around Israel's prime minister, Ehud Olmert, tightened a notch yesterday when the defense minister called on him to remove himself from his post pending the outcome of a high-profile corruption investigation in which Olmert is embroiled. But Olmert seemed determined to stay put. "The prime minister is convinced that as this investigation continues it will become absolutely clear he did nothing wrong," said an official close to Olmert. "He doesn't want to see the political process trump the legal one," the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity, because he was not authorized to discuss the matter in public.
NEWS
March 30, 2006
They're entitled to have their own opinions. I never questioned their right to be wrong."- EHUD OLMERT, acting prime minister of Israel, on his children's political points of view, during an appearance on PBS' Frontline/World
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israel's senior army commander says that his country could safely withdraw from the Golan Heights in any future peace settlement with Syria, without retaining any occupied territory there as a buffer. Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon, the army chief of staff, broke with Israel's traditional position in an interview published yesterday with the newspaper Yediot Aharonot, saying: "From the point of view of military requirements, we could reach an agreement with Syria by giving up the Golan Heights.
NEWS
By Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux and Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | May 4, 2007
Tel Aviv, Israel -- Under a banner reading "Failures, Go Home," tens of thousands of Israelis from across the political spectrum joined last night in demanding the resignations of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and his defense minister for their performance during last summer's war in Lebanon. The Israeli leader remained defiant, telling aides that the size and diversity of the crowd would not dissuade him from staying in office. Police said more than 100,000 demonstrators filled Rabin Square in front of City Hall and spilled into surrounding streets.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Olmert, in his first major policy address since becoming Israel's acting prime minister, said yesterday that he backs the creation of a Palestinian state and that Israel will have to relinquish parts of the West Bank to maintain its Jewish majority. "We support the establishment of a modern, democratic Palestinian state," Olmert said at the annual Herzliya Conference near Tel Aviv, which has become a forum for important speeches by Israeli leaders. "The existence of two nations, one Jewish and one Palestinian, is the full solution to the national aspirations and problems of each of the peoples."
NEWS
By From staff reports | May 16, 2001
In Baltimore County 17-year-old Essex girl pleads guilty in cabbie's stabbing TOWSON - A 17-year-old Essex girl pleaded guilty to first-degree assault yesterday for stabbing a driver who had picked her up in his taxi last fall. Denita Mitchell of the 1600 block of Rickenbacker Road faces up to 25 years when she is sentenced July 26 by Baltimore County Circuit Judge John G. Turnbull II. Gail Green, 55, had picked up Mitchell about 7:45 p.m. Nov. 17 in Dundalk and was driving her home when she stabbed him five times in the shoulder and arm, said Assistant State's Attorney Al Webster.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Olmert, who took over as acting prime minister last night after Ariel Sharon was hospitalized, has been the Israeli leader's steadfast ally as the pair shifted over time from ideological hard-liners to advocates for withdrawing from the Gaza Strip and part of the West Bank. The 60-year-old vice prime minister, a lawyer who served as Jerusalem's mayor for a decade, was among the core of Likud Party members to accompany Sharon in November when the prime minister abandoned the conservative party to found a centrist movement called Kadima, Hebrew for "forward."
NEWS
By Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux and Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | May 4, 2007
Tel Aviv, Israel -- Under a banner reading "Failures, Go Home," tens of thousands of Israelis from across the political spectrum joined last night in demanding the resignations of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and his defense minister for their performance during last summer's war in Lebanon. The Israeli leader remained defiant, telling aides that the size and diversity of the crowd would not dissuade him from staying in office. Police said more than 100,000 demonstrators filled Rabin Square in front of City Hall and spilled into surrounding streets.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
JERUSALEM --Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and her Israeli counterpart declared yesterday their support for a bilateral diplomatic strategy enabling moderate political leaders across the Middle East, but offered little new to push ahead any agreement with the Palestinians. Rice played down expectations for any breakthrough during her travels. "I expect this trip to really be one in which we have intensive consultations," she said, opening weeklong travels across the Middle East and the Persian Gulf before consulting with allies in Western Europe.
NEWS
March 30, 2006
They're entitled to have their own opinions. I never questioned their right to be wrong."- EHUD OLMERT, acting prime minister of Israel, on his children's political points of view, during an appearance on PBS' Frontline/World
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Few Israelis imagined a year ago that Ehud Olmert would become their country's next prime minister. The former mayor of Jerusalem had a reputation as a cold, sometimes arrogant politician burdened by accusations of corruption. But Olmert led the new centrist party Kadima to victory in parliamentary elections yesterday, gaining an endorsement for his plan to give up some Jewish settlements in the West Bank and to define Israel's permanent borders -- with or without negotiations with the Palestinians.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Olmert, in his first major policy address since becoming Israel's acting prime minister, said yesterday that he backs the creation of a Palestinian state and that Israel will have to relinquish parts of the West Bank to maintain its Jewish majority. "We support the establishment of a modern, democratic Palestinian state," Olmert said at the annual Herzliya Conference near Tel Aviv, which has become a forum for important speeches by Israeli leaders. "The existence of two nations, one Jewish and one Palestinian, is the full solution to the national aspirations and problems of each of the peoples."
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Olmert, who took over as acting prime minister last night after Ariel Sharon was hospitalized, has been the Israeli leader's steadfast ally as the pair shifted over time from ideological hard-liners to advocates for withdrawing from the Gaza Strip and part of the West Bank. The 60-year-old vice prime minister, a lawyer who served as Jerusalem's mayor for a decade, was among the core of Likud Party members to accompany Sharon in November when the prime minister abandoned the conservative party to found a centrist movement called Kadima, Hebrew for "forward."
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Few Israelis imagined a year ago that Ehud Olmert would become their country's next prime minister. The former mayor of Jerusalem had a reputation as a cold, sometimes arrogant politician burdened by accusations of corruption. But Olmert led the new centrist party Kadima to victory in parliamentary elections yesterday, gaining an endorsement for his plan to give up some Jewish settlements in the West Bank and to define Israel's permanent borders -- with or without negotiations with the Palestinians.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 2007
JERUSALEM --Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and her Israeli counterpart declared yesterday their support for a bilateral diplomatic strategy enabling moderate political leaders across the Middle East, but offered little new to push ahead any agreement with the Palestinians. Rice played down expectations for any breakthrough during her travels. "I expect this trip to really be one in which we have intensive consultations," she said, opening weeklong travels across the Middle East and the Persian Gulf before consulting with allies in Western Europe.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2004
JERUSALEM - Israel's senior army commander says that his country could safely withdraw from the Golan Heights in any future peace settlement with Syria, without retaining any occupied territory there as a buffer. Lt. Gen. Moshe Yaalon, the army chief of staff, broke with Israel's traditional position in an interview published yesterday with the newspaper Yediot Aharonot, saying: "From the point of view of military requirements, we could reach an agreement with Syria by giving up the Golan Heights.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 2, 2003
JERUSALEM - The ceremony was painstakingly rehearsed. Two leaders - the Israeli with a state and the Palestinian trying to get one - stood side by side yesterday and told their skeptical publics that diplomacy, not warfare, would lead to a better future. Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and his Palestinian counterpart, Mahmoud Abbas, never wavered from prepared texts that were scripted down to the last syllable and delivered at Sharon's Jerusalem office in a setting designed for television.
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