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By Tom Teepen | May 23, 1999
THE Israeli elections produced a strong personal mandate for Ehud Barak as prime minister -- and a stinging rejection of the policies and machinations of Benjamin Netanyahu -- but they settled none of the divisions in Israeli society and may even have exacerbated a few.Mr. Barak has no easy tasks ahead of him in working up the unity he wishes for within Israel or in carrying out what he hopes will be the end game in the Middle East peace process. There are forces within and outside the country committed to make each challenge difficult, and impossible if they can.Mr.
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NEWS
August 5, 2013
Regarding your editorial on the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, the emphasis on "peace" may be a misnomer in this conflict (" Israeli-Palestinian talks merit guarded pessimism," July 31). These negotiations are not, and never have been, about peace. Israel has enjoyed relative peace since its inception. The wars it has been involved in have been of its own making. Granted, there have been some Israelis killed by Palestinians - and many, many more Palestinians killed by Israelis.
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NEWS
September 11, 2001
TEL AVIV, Israel - Ehud Barak puts his feet up on his glass coffee table and sips a neatly poured beer, the foam cresting at the top of the glass. "The day's almost over," he says, smiling, as the sounds of traffic from the evening rush hour intrude on his guarded seventh-story office. He is the former prime minister of Israel, and it has been seven months since he lost that office to Ariel Sharon. In July 2000 Barak seemed tantalizing close to negotiating a permanent peace settlement with the Palestinians, led by Yasser Arafat.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Barak, the former Israeli prime minister ousted by voters six years ago, recaptured leadership of the Labor Party yesterday. Barak's victory, by a margin of 53 percent to 47 percent over lawmaker Ami Ayalon in a party runoff, represents a remarkable political rebirth for the ambitious and strong-willed leader who lost in 2001 to the hawkish Ariel Sharon. "Today begins the journey toward restoration," Barak told supporters early today during a brief victory speech at party headquarters in Tel Aviv.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 23, 1999
Psst, buddy, wanna buy an F-22 on the cheap? How 'bout not so cheap? Ehud Barak is the man. Arafat and Assad know it. The trade deficit was $21 billion in May. That's a lot of running shoes. Lawrence Bell for mayor! That man needs a raise. Whatever else, Hemingway knew how to write. He kept it short. Pub Date: 7/23/99
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 25, 1999
JERUSALEM -- The death of King Hassan II of Morocco has slowed the whirlwind peacemaking itinerary of Ehud Barak, the new prime minister of Israel.A meeting planned for last night with Yasser Arafat, the Palestinian leader, has been postponed, as has a visit to Alexandria, Egypt, to meet with President Hosni Mubarak today.The king's funeral today could bring together in Rabat, Morocco, all of the key figures in the Middle East peace efforts.Most significant, it could produce the first face-to-face encounter between the Israeli prime minister and President Hafez el Assad of Syria.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - George W. Bush accused the Clinton administration yesterday of interfering in Israel's internal affairs, charging the White House with backing Ehud Barak over Benjamin Netanyahu in Israeli elections last year. "In recent times, Washington has tried to make Israel conform to its own plans and timetables," the likely Republican presidential nominee told a powerful pro-Israel lobbying organization. "A clear and bad example was the administration's attempt to take sides in the most recent Israeli election.
NEWS
July 4, 1999
EHUD Barak has created through tortuous negotiation a broad-based coalition to complete peace, reflecting the strong vote he received in Israel's May 17 election.With 75 of the Knesset's 120 seats (only 26 from his own Labor Party and One Israel coalition) and additional votes on the back benches for a policy of accord, the Barak government will be impervious to the threat of any political party to hold peace hostage to its domestic agenda. It is a government that may be uncertain on economics and will have difficulty surviving discord on domestic social issues, but it can complete peace with the Palestinians and reach agreement with Syria.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
Regarding your editorial on the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, the emphasis on "peace" may be a misnomer in this conflict (" Israeli-Palestinian talks merit guarded pessimism," July 31). These negotiations are not, and never have been, about peace. Israel has enjoyed relative peace since its inception. The wars it has been involved in have been of its own making. Granted, there have been some Israelis killed by Palestinians - and many, many more Palestinians killed by Israelis.
NEWS
February 8, 2001
ARIEL Sharon's landslide election as prime minister of Israel is a great personal vindication for the 72-year-old warrior who was considered a political has-been. He is entitled to savor the moment. But he does not have time. The landslide is part illusion. Israelis were rejecting Prime Minister Ehud Barak -- not for trying to make peace, but for failing. They were also rejecting Yasser Arafat as partner in peace-making, believing his unremitting insistence on a "right of return" was code for the destruction of Israel and his incitement of violence a betrayal of commitments.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 16, 2006
JERUSALEM -- In the six years since Israel withdrew its forces from southern Lebanon, the Islamic group Hezbollah made it abundantly clear that Israel would not find quiet along its northern border. Posted in watchtowers, Hezbollah fighters continued a campaign of rocket and mortar attacks, shootings and abductions that menaced Israeli communities. Israel responded largely with restraint. Neither side wanted a deeper conflict. They settled for a bitter coexistence. But tensions, analysts say, were always building.
NEWS
April 5, 2002
Hateful propaganda leads Muslim world to detest the West I agree with Thomas L. Friedman to the extent that he applauds the Bush administration's move to increase foreign aid to poor countries and asks for a foreign policy that pursues a course of "enlightened self-interest" ("Let's set a moral example for the world," Opinion * Commentary, March 20). But he is very wrong to assume the Muslims who hate us do so because of our greed or support for their bad regimes or anything we have done.
NEWS
September 11, 2001
TEL AVIV, Israel - Ehud Barak puts his feet up on his glass coffee table and sips a neatly poured beer, the foam cresting at the top of the glass. "The day's almost over," he says, smiling, as the sounds of traffic from the evening rush hour intrude on his guarded seventh-story office. He is the former prime minister of Israel, and it has been seven months since he lost that office to Ariel Sharon. In July 2000 Barak seemed tantalizing close to negotiating a permanent peace settlement with the Palestinians, led by Yasser Arafat.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 2001
JERUSALEM - Israel's prime minister-elect, Ariel Sharon, moved closer to forming a coalition with the battered Labor Party last night amid increasing signs that the man he defeated, Ehud Barak, would stay on as defense minister. In negotiations with Sharon's right-wing Likud Party yesterday, Labor abandoned the goal of trying to reach a permanent peace with the Palestinians, instead accepting Sharon's idea of a long-term interim agreement offering improved security for Israel and some economic benefits to the Palestinians, Israel Radio reported.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 11, 2001
JERUSALEM - The fate of the Middle East over the next few months rests heavily on how two resilient old enemies, each stained with the blood of the other's people, size each other up: Israeli Prime Minister-elect Ariel Sharon and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. The last time Sharon and Arafat faced off was at Maryland's Wye Plantation in 1998. Sharon, then a minister in the Israeli government, famously refused to shake Arafat's hand - American hosts deftly avoided encounters where he would have to. Yet Sharon sat down with Palestinian negotiators to work out an Israeli withdrawal from 13 percent of the West Bank.
NEWS
February 8, 2001
ARIEL Sharon's landslide election as prime minister of Israel is a great personal vindication for the 72-year-old warrior who was considered a political has-been. He is entitled to savor the moment. But he does not have time. The landslide is part illusion. Israelis were rejecting Prime Minister Ehud Barak -- not for trying to make peace, but for failing. They were also rejecting Yasser Arafat as partner in peace-making, believing his unremitting insistence on a "right of return" was code for the destruction of Israel and his incitement of violence a betrayal of commitments.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 13, 2001
JERUSALEM - Israel's prime minister-elect, Ariel Sharon, moved closer to forming a coalition with the battered Labor Party last night amid increasing signs that the man he defeated, Ehud Barak, would stay on as defense minister. In negotiations with Sharon's right-wing Likud Party yesterday, Labor abandoned the goal of trying to reach a permanent peace with the Palestinians, instead accepting Sharon's idea of a long-term interim agreement offering improved security for Israel and some economic benefits to the Palestinians, Israel Radio reported.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 1997
JERUSALEM -- Exercising a harsh new economic weapon against the Palestinian leadership, the Israeli government has suspended reimbursement of taxes and other fees that it owes to the Palestinian authority. The money accounts for nearly two-thirds of the authority's annual revenue.The plan was announced last week and approved by the Israeli Cabinet on Sunday. Even Israeli officials concede that it also represents an unambiguous violation of the peace accords that Israel has signed with the Palestinians.
NEWS
February 5, 2001
Ehud Barak and Ariel Sharon, Israel's two most famous generals, are the candidates tomorrow in their country's election of a new prime minister, a contest Sharon is heavily favored to win. No two figures better embody Israel's political left and right: Barak, leader of the Labor Party and current prime minister, invested his political capital in failed peace negotiations with the Palestinian Authority. Sharon, leader of the Likud and a swashbuckling military commander, is better known as a fervent advocate of Jewish settlements in the West Bank.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 2, 2001
JERUSALEM - Jews from the former Soviet Union helped topple Yitzhak Shamir in 1992, Shimon Peres in 1996 and Benjamin Netanyahu in 1999. Now, many are preparing to do the same to Ehud Barak on Tuesday. Coming from a nation where they felt officially persecuted, "the Russians," as they're known here, tend to take a dark view of political leaders generally, and in the past three elections have voted to punish incumbents rather than reward. With Barak, they have particular scores to settle.
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