Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEgyptian People
IN THE NEWS

Egyptian People

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 2, 2011
The article titled "Treading carefully in Egypt response" which appeared in your paper on Jan. 31 completely misses the point of the Lotus Revolution. The people of Egypt spoke in a very clear and loud condemnation of President Hosni Mubarak and his regime. Many have given their lives and thousands more have been beaten and put in jail for wanting freedom and other basic human rights. The American administration, by failing to recognize that Mr. Mubarak has had 30 years during which he and his administration failed to fulfill any reforms toward a Democratic system, is playing a very dangerous game for American security in the region.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David A. Super | February 23, 2014
Three years ago this month, millions of brave Egyptians were celebrating the fall of their brutal, corrupt dictator, Hosni Mubarak. To the American eye, the Arab Spring was even more remarkable than the revolutions that brought down the Soviet empire two decades earlier. It was an article of faith that the people of eastern Europe longed to be free and that communist economic mismanagement would eventually weaken those regimes; the only real surprise was the uprisings' timing. By contrast, we had been told that Arabs preferred the strong hand of despots and that many of the autocrats were "pro-Western" (which conjures images of democratic openness)
Advertisement
NEWS
By David A. Super | February 23, 2014
Three years ago this month, millions of brave Egyptians were celebrating the fall of their brutal, corrupt dictator, Hosni Mubarak. To the American eye, the Arab Spring was even more remarkable than the revolutions that brought down the Soviet empire two decades earlier. It was an article of faith that the people of eastern Europe longed to be free and that communist economic mismanagement would eventually weaken those regimes; the only real surprise was the uprisings' timing. By contrast, we had been told that Arabs preferred the strong hand of despots and that many of the autocrats were "pro-Western" (which conjures images of democratic openness)
NEWS
June 17, 2013
Reader Nelson Marans' recent letter about President Obama's foreign policy contains numerous misstatements ("Ehrlich is right; Obama's foreign policy a shambles," June 12). First, the Egyptian people overthrew a corrupt and incompetent government. The U.S. had nothing to do with it. Second, Syria is involved in a civil war that has nothing to do with the U.S. We are correct to stay out of it. Third, there is no evidence that Iran, a country that does not threaten U.S. national interests, has either nuclear weapons or a weapons program.
NEWS
July 5, 2012
Al Eisner, in his letter, "Egyptian election is tragic" (June 29), has substituted opinion for fact when he calls the Muslim Brotherhood "a virulent anti-Semitic organization. " Anti-Zionist, yes; but he provides no evidence whatsoever that it is anti-Semitic. Mr. Eisner shows no compassion for the Egyptian people who suffered for so many years under the brutal dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak. Instead, his concern is only for Israel and what Egypt's new government might mean for Egyptian/Israel relations and also for U.S./Israel relations.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
Reader Nelson Marans' recent letter about President Obama's foreign policy contains numerous misstatements ("Ehrlich is right; Obama's foreign policy a shambles," June 12). First, the Egyptian people overthrew a corrupt and incompetent government. The U.S. had nothing to do with it. Second, Syria is involved in a civil war that has nothing to do with the U.S. We are correct to stay out of it. Third, there is no evidence that Iran, a country that does not threaten U.S. national interests, has either nuclear weapons or a weapons program.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Regarding your recent article on the Egyptian presidential elections, Turkey has no claims or aspirations to be a "model" for the Middle East ("Slouching toward democracy," June 27). We are ready to share our experience and provide all possible support if asked, and we wish the Egyptian people the best. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has clearly outlined this when he said Turkey was ready to do its fair share to promote democratization in the Middle East and to facilitate this momentous transformation.
NEWS
February 13, 2011
The compelling scene of celebration on the streets of Egypt on Friday, when Vice President Omar Suleiman announced that President Hosni Mubarak had resigned and left Cairo, was a fitting tribute to the aspirations of 80 million Egyptians and validation to all those around the world who believe in democracy, the power of peaceful protest and the right of all people to seek redress of their grievances. After the shock and confusion Thursday night after Mr. Mubarak failed, in what was billed as his resignation speech, to actually resign, Friday's news sparked an outporuing of hope the likes of which the world has not seen since the fall of communism 20 years ago. But what comes next will be just as important as the revolution itself.
NEWS
June 20, 2012
Egyptians are expected to learn the results of their first-ever democratic presidential contest Thursday, but what should have been a watershed moment in that nation has instead turned into a sour reminder of how difficult it will be to overcome an authoritarian past. Before voting was completed, the nation's generals staged what amounted to a military coup by announcing they, not the new president, would control the prime minister, parliament, the national budget and matters of war and peace - all without civilian oversight or accountability.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 30, 2012
Throughout America's history, there have been people who denied threats from our enemies. During the Revolutionary War, significant numbers sided with the British monarchy. Enablers in politics, the media and even religion helped Communism remain in power for seven decades in the Soviet Union. German Nazis had their U.S. apologists. The presidential election in Egypt, won by the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi, challenges contemporary deniers and enablers who refuse to acknowledge the threat advancing Islamism poses to Israel and the West.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
Regarding your recent article on the Egyptian presidential elections, Turkey has no claims or aspirations to be a "model" for the Middle East ("Slouching toward democracy," June 27). We are ready to share our experience and provide all possible support if asked, and we wish the Egyptian people the best. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has clearly outlined this when he said Turkey was ready to do its fair share to promote democratization in the Middle East and to facilitate this momentous transformation.
NEWS
July 5, 2012
Al Eisner, in his letter, "Egyptian election is tragic" (June 29), has substituted opinion for fact when he calls the Muslim Brotherhood "a virulent anti-Semitic organization. " Anti-Zionist, yes; but he provides no evidence whatsoever that it is anti-Semitic. Mr. Eisner shows no compassion for the Egyptian people who suffered for so many years under the brutal dictatorship of Hosni Mubarak. Instead, his concern is only for Israel and what Egypt's new government might mean for Egyptian/Israel relations and also for U.S./Israel relations.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 30, 2012
Throughout America's history, there have been people who denied threats from our enemies. During the Revolutionary War, significant numbers sided with the British monarchy. Enablers in politics, the media and even religion helped Communism remain in power for seven decades in the Soviet Union. German Nazis had their U.S. apologists. The presidential election in Egypt, won by the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohamed Morsi, challenges contemporary deniers and enablers who refuse to acknowledge the threat advancing Islamism poses to Israel and the West.
NEWS
June 20, 2012
Egyptians are expected to learn the results of their first-ever democratic presidential contest Thursday, but what should have been a watershed moment in that nation has instead turned into a sour reminder of how difficult it will be to overcome an authoritarian past. Before voting was completed, the nation's generals staged what amounted to a military coup by announcing they, not the new president, would control the prime minister, parliament, the national budget and matters of war and peace - all without civilian oversight or accountability.
NEWS
February 13, 2011
The compelling scene of celebration on the streets of Egypt on Friday, when Vice President Omar Suleiman announced that President Hosni Mubarak had resigned and left Cairo, was a fitting tribute to the aspirations of 80 million Egyptians and validation to all those around the world who believe in democracy, the power of peaceful protest and the right of all people to seek redress of their grievances. After the shock and confusion Thursday night after Mr. Mubarak failed, in what was billed as his resignation speech, to actually resign, Friday's news sparked an outporuing of hope the likes of which the world has not seen since the fall of communism 20 years ago. But what comes next will be just as important as the revolution itself.
NEWS
February 2, 2011
The article titled "Treading carefully in Egypt response" which appeared in your paper on Jan. 31 completely misses the point of the Lotus Revolution. The people of Egypt spoke in a very clear and loud condemnation of President Hosni Mubarak and his regime. Many have given their lives and thousands more have been beaten and put in jail for wanting freedom and other basic human rights. The American administration, by failing to recognize that Mr. Mubarak has had 30 years during which he and his administration failed to fulfill any reforms toward a Democratic system, is playing a very dangerous game for American security in the region.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
It can now be said that President Barack Obama was instrumental and outspoken in causing the ouster of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak, even though Egypt had been a friend of the United States and had kept general peace in the Middle East for some 30 years, especially between Egypt and Israel. President Obama, in calling for a democracy in Egypt and new elections, had to know that there was only one well organized political party in Egypt at the time, the Muslim Brotherhood. Sure enough, Mohammed Morsi, the head of the Muslim Brotherhood, became president of Egypt.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.