Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEgypt
IN THE NEWS

Egypt

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Nobody ever said Egypt's transition to democracy would be easy. But yesterday's violence in which dozens of supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi were killed and hundreds wounded by security forces outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo has made that country's path from dictatorship to democracy infinitely more difficult. Last week's military coup against Egypt's first democratically elected president was proof enough that Egyptians are still a long way from realizing the ideals of representative government and rule of law inspired by the Arab Spring.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Adil E. Shamoo | June 3, 2014
Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi Mohamed Morsi Hosni Mobarak Egypt presidential election As expected, former Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi won the latest Egyptian election for president by a landslide, giving the military establishment total control of all governmental instruments of power. He won 92 percent of the votes with 46 percent turnout. President-elect el-Sissi now has a historic chance to usher in a new democratic Egypt. Unfortunately, the last 10 months of his rule have indicated a far different future for his struggling country.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 24, 2011
The difference between the people of Egypt, Libya and Wisconsin is that the latter start protesting at the beginning of their suppression instead of after decades. In each place, a strong man is saying if you'd just do what I say, you wouldn't need rights. This is a basic flaw in the Republicans' approach to government. Arise, Wisconsin! Arise, Indiana! Theodore Carl Houk, Towson
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
The people of Egypt have set their eyes on a dark horse presidential candidate. He's ambitious, comfortable with world leaders and comfortable in front of a camera.  Very comfortable. Kevin Spacey is the subject of a tongue-in-cheek write-in campaign to be Egypt's next president. Doctored "House of Cards" promotional photos started floating around the internet last week. They show Spacey, in character as ruthless American politician Frank Underwood, with Egyptian campaign slogans.
NEWS
February 15, 2011
The collapse of the Mubarak regime will have dire consequences on the future of the Middle East and the State of Israel. The warning signs are there now, and a domino-style collapse of moderate Arab regimes could lead Israel to war, just like it did in1948. Hosni Mubarak's resignation from power in Egypt and the growing turmoil in nearby Jordan are ominous and bad signs for Israel. The relations between Egypt and rest of civilized world will be determined by the army of Egypt under pressure by the Islamic Brotherhood both in and out of Egypt.
NEWS
February 21, 2011
For three days, thousands of ordinary citizens in Wisconsin have rallied in the state capital to protest tyrannical government actions against the will of the majority of the people -- just like Egypt. Yet The Sun has not given the citizens of Wisconsin the same front page coverage that it gave Egyptians. Now, the governor of Wisconsin has threatened to call out his military to quash the popular uprising -- just like Egypt. Yet The Sun still hasn't given the citizens of Wisconsin the same front page coverage that it gave Egyptians.
NEWS
By Adil E. Shamoo | June 3, 2014
Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi Mohamed Morsi Hosni Mobarak Egypt presidential election As expected, former Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi won the latest Egyptian election for president by a landslide, giving the military establishment total control of all governmental instruments of power. He won 92 percent of the votes with 46 percent turnout. President-elect el-Sissi now has a historic chance to usher in a new democratic Egypt. Unfortunately, the last 10 months of his rule have indicated a far different future for his struggling country.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
IT MIGHT have been an awkward moment for the secretary of state with the Egyptian foreign minister at her side. But Condoleezza Rice didn't show it, when asked about Cairo's jailing of an Egyptian opposition leader. And she certainly didn't duck the question. Her strong sentiments about Egypt's unacceptable detention of Ayman Noor were appropriate. The diplomat, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, kept his thoughts to himself. What could he say? But Ms. Rice's "very strong concerns" about the fate of Mr. Noor can't be the last words on Cairo's harsh treatment of reformers.
NEWS
September 9, 2005
FOR STARTERS, Egypt's president did not win 99.9 percent of the vote, the usual tally for Middle Eastern autocrats. In voting Wednesday, incumbent Hosni Mubarak handily defeated a field of nine candidates. But the real winner in Egypt's first contested presidential election was leading opposition candidate Ayman Nour, who reportedly received about 12 percent of the vote. His was a credible showing after two decades of referendum-only votes in which Egyptians could cast a "yes" or "no" for the sole candidate, Mr. Mubarak.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 29, 2012
Prior to leaving Egypt for the United Nations General Assembly, Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi told The New York Timesthe United States needs to "fundamentally change" its approach to the Arab world. That includes, he said, showing greater respect for Arab values, as well as helping to build a Palestinian state. Is there an Arab equivalent for the Yiddish word "chutzpah"? It isn't the policies and attitude of the United States toward the Arab world that need changing. It's the attitude and policies of the Arab world that need to change.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
If there were any doubt that Egypt's fragile transition to democracy is being undermined by powerful forces bent on re-establishing the authoritarian rule of former military strongman Hosni Mubarak before his ouster in 2011, two incidents last week show the disturbing direction in which events there are drifting. On Monday, a court in the Upper Egyptian city of Minya handed down death sentences to 529 defendants accused of murdering a policeman last year. The charges were obviously fabricated to target Muslim Brotherhood supporters of former President Mohamed Morsi, who was overthrown by a military coup last year, as well as secular opponents of the regime and intellectuals.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
I have been working in Egypt on various development projects for more than 15 years now and have been present here for seven to eight months in each of the past three years. I have personally witnessed every significant sociopolitical event here over that time and am in constant conversation about those events with my Egyptian project staff who are themselves politically diverse. My opinion is that much of the western media reporting over the past three years has been very superficial - often lop-sided - and often simply wrong.
NEWS
By David A. Super | February 23, 2014
Three years ago this month, millions of brave Egyptians were celebrating the fall of their brutal, corrupt dictator, Hosni Mubarak. To the American eye, the Arab Spring was even more remarkable than the revolutions that brought down the Soviet empire two decades earlier. It was an article of faith that the people of eastern Europe longed to be free and that communist economic mismanagement would eventually weaken those regimes; the only real surprise was the uprisings' timing. By contrast, we had been told that Arabs preferred the strong hand of despots and that many of the autocrats were "pro-Western" (which conjures images of democratic openness)
NEWS
October 10, 2013
On Wednesday the U.S. announced that President Barack Obama had suspended hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Egypt in response to the military government's bloody crackdown that has left more than 1,000 protesters dead and thousands more jailed or forced into hiding. Aides to the president say the suspension of aid is temporary and aimed at demonstrating American displeasure with the generals' attempt to abort the fledgling democracy Egyptians were trying to construct after the fall of former strongman Hosni Mubarak two years ago. But while the U.S. may wish to leverage the aid it gives Egypt's military to nudge its current leaders toward returning power to an elected civilian government, there's been little sign the generals are listening or, if they are, that the prospect of a suspension of U.S. aid will do much to alter their behavior.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Henry Walters and J.P. Morgan were frenemies. Both were the sons of powerful fathers. They didn't come into their own until they reached middle age, when they were widely acknowledged as two of the premier financiers of the Gilded Age. Both displayed an inclination toward collecting art as children. As grown-ups, the two titans competed over who would acquire the next painting or objet d'art. So it's only fitting that portions of a 2,000-year-old Egyptian papyrus known as "The Book of the Faiyum" belonging to institutions founded by each mogul are being displayed for the first time in 150 years in a new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum . "There was this kind of early-20th-century friendly rivalry between J.P. Morgan and Henry Walters," says Julia Marciari-Alexander," the director of the Baltimore museum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Julia Andree Delbourgo, who hid from the Nazis in wartime France and, after immigrating to the U.S. with her family, taught French in Baltimore private schools, died of cancer Sept. 7 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Pikesville resident was 85. The daughter of a wealthy businessman and a dealer in Egyptian antiquities, the former Julia Andree Menache - she never used her first name - was born and raised in Paris. Her parents divorced when she an infant, and she did not met her father until she was 18, when, after the end of World War II, she was brought to Alexandria, Egypt, to live with her family.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
The Sun editorial staff's response to the military coup against Egypt's democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi is to urge the generals return to country's back to civilian control quickly ("Egypt's revolution, Part II," July 4). Apparently, it is OK with The Sun that a minority of the population gets a second chance to elect the person they feel will be better for the country through mob tactics. Elections have consequences, and Americans have been reminded of that fact over the past six years of the Obama administration.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | April 20, 2013
A plague of locusts swept through Egypt a few weeks ago, an estimated 30 million of the critters. Egyptian officials tried to downplay the phenomenon, hoping to quash any biblical analogies. They noted that locust swarms show up in the spring every now and then. But more earthly indicators suggest that the blighted Egyptian government is in such deep political and economic trouble that perhaps the analogy is apt. Experts and senior government officials worldwide are warning that Egypt's economy is hurtling toward collapse.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
It can now be said that President Barack Obama was instrumental and outspoken in causing the ouster of Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak, even though Egypt had been a friend of the United States and had kept general peace in the Middle East for some 30 years, especially between Egypt and Israel. President Obama, in calling for a democracy in Egypt and new elections, had to know that there was only one well organized political party in Egypt at the time, the Muslim Brotherhood. Sure enough, Mohammed Morsi, the head of the Muslim Brotherhood, became president of Egypt.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 27, 2013
President Barack Obama, in a sea of foreign policy troubles, accepted his leadership responsibilities in a CNN interview last week while lamenting the complexity of these challenges. He noted the old Harry Truman dictum that "the buck stops" in the Oval Office and asserted U.S. power and influence in the world must be "in our long-term national interests. " He mentioned both in the context of the developing civil wars in Egypt and Syria and growing calls for American intervention. The reports that chemical weapons were used by the regime in Syria against the insurgents, he said, "starts getting to some core national interests that the United States has, both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating, as well as needing to protect our allies [and]
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.