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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 22, 2007
If it takes a tough man to make a tender chicken, who could possibly be up to this task: making a $2,500 jeweled evening bag out of an ostrich egg? The tough guy's chick, that's who. While describing some of Nancy Grasmick's fancy-schmancy knickknacks the other day, I mentioned that Frank Perdue's widow makes "faux Faberge eggs," one of which sits in the state school superintendent's living room. Fowl! cried Mitzi Perdue, all the way from Paris, where she was visiting friends. "No, no, no, my goodness, no!"
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 31, 1998
TONIGHT THE AIR will be filled with ghostly howls and maybe a few dozen eggs.Halloween is one of my favorite holidays. You get to pretend to be somebody else and are rewarded for your charade with candy.But one of the unpleasant parts of the celebration is the need that devilish youths occasionally have to pelt cars with eggs.I will let others sermonize on what this egg-tossing behavior says about the moral fabric of the nation's youth. I am concerned about what eggs can do to a car's finish.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | July 16, 1991
THE LIKELIHOOD of getting salmonella through shell eggs at home is small. For safety's sake, however, the Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline advises taking these precautions when handling and cooking eggs:* Buy only clean, uncracked eggs from refrigerated cases. If you find a cracked egg in the carton, throw it out.* Keep eggs refrigerated and use in three to five weeks. Do not let eggs sit at room temperature for more than an hour.For optimal safety, both the white and the yolk of eggs should be thoroughly cooked.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | April 18, 1992
Dying for some colored eggs? But not dying to dye them?You're in luck.A Pennsylvania egg producer is helping out the Easter Bunny by cooking and coloring eggs, and delivering them to grocery stores and markets for those who want tradition without trouble.R. W. Sauder Co. of Lititz, Pa., has prepared more than 250,000 ready-to-eat Easter eggs in six colors and is distributing them in the Baltimore area for the first time this season."It's kind of a novelty," says Bill Murray, the product development manager for R. W. Sauder, which has produced the eggs for the last two Easters.
HEALTH
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Colleen Pierre, a registered dietitian, is the nutrition consultant to the Union Memorial Sports Medicine Center in Baltimore and national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association | September 18, 1990
The American Heart Association has established that three egg yolks a week are a pretty safe bet for your coronary arteries, even if your blood cholesterol needs lowering.But with recent outbreaks of food poisoning caused by salmonella enteritidis, are they safe for your tummy as well?While there are a few groups who must be extremely careful, most people can relax and enjoy freshly prepared eggs, according to the Public Health Service -- Centers for Disease Control.And last week, the federal Food and Drug Administration issued new guidelines and precautions for serving and preparing eggs.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 27, 1993
It is not every day you meet the chickens that laid your breakfast. That happened to me recently when I toured the chicken house at Virginia Organic Farms near Manassas.Several thousand big brown hens either squawked their greetings or came running over to peck at my shoe laces. They resided in an airy barn that opened onto a sunny, fenced-in yard. The chickens moved with impunity. Their food was grown in nearby corn and soybean fields. They sipped water provided by a spring-fed pond. But regardless of what the residents eat and how freely they roam, chicken houses are still aromatic.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 25, 2004
I watch a lot of the cooking shows and every time someone peels a hard-boiled egg the shells fall right off. This never happens to me; is there a trick in doing this? Don't you wish in real life that you could sometimes just yell, "CUT!" and redo something you messed up? I have some inside information for you: On cooking shows, we do it all the time. You never see the spills, splatters and goof-ups that happen on every one of those sets. The real reason that shells peel right off the eggs on cooking shows is probably because the food is ordered well in advance of taping to make certain everything is there when they need it. And believe it or not, when it comes to hard-boiled eggs, the fresher they are, the harder they are to peel.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | August 18, 1999
* Item: Chef's Omelets* What you get: 2 frozen omelets* Cost: About $2.70* Preparation time: 2 to 2 1/2 minutes in microwave, 25 minutes in oven, 29 minutes in toaster oven* Review: Eggs and the freezer have never paired well together. Although Chef's Omelets makes a valiant try, I think it's going to take more advanced technology to convince consumers otherwise. Microwaved, these omelets tend to be on the rubbery side. Baked in the oven (which defeats the convenience aspect), they don't fare much better.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | December 21, 1994
Q: Is there a good way to hard boil eggs so they don't crack while boiling and will peel easily afterward?A: Rather than boiling an egg furiously, simmer it gently for 12 minutes. Drain the water from the pan and run cold water over to stop the cooking. Drain again and gently crack the eggs by lightly shaking the pan. Cover the eggs again with cold water and peel when cool.Start peeling at the large end where the air pocket is most likely to be and peel under cool running water. It is true that the fresher the egg, the harder it is to peel, so hard boil the eggs that have been in your refrigerator the longest.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | March 30, 1994
Not all Easter eggs are for children.For hundreds of years, a tradition of drawing colorful eggs has continued in Ukraine. Several dozen eggs, called pysanky, dyed in the Ukrainian manner, are on exhibit at the North Carroll Public Library in Greenmount until Friday.Ukrainian eggs look painted, but the intricate leaves, flowers, animals and crosshatching are created by wax resist and layers of dye. At first, melted beeswax is drawn on the egg through a hollow brass tube called a kiska.Then the egg is dipped in a rainbow of dyes, one at a time, light to dark.
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