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Eggs

NEWS
By Frank D.Roylance and Frank D.Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1990
Chances are, the eggs in the batter you lick from the beater tonight, or the ones you'll fry "over easy" tomorrow, won't kill you, or even make you sick.But federal officials are worried enough about the spread of a mutant salmonella bacterium in the nation's egg supply that they want state and local authorities to crack down on food handlers who don't take the threat seriously.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently designated eggs a "potentially hazardous food," capable of supporting the growth of dangerous Salmonella enteritidis bacteria if not stored and cooked properly.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 26, 2007
I have always been amazed by the delectable ways the French have for preparing eggs. Last month, while in Paris, I ordered an oeuf en cocotte au crabe and l'estragon - which translates as an egg baked in a dish with crab and tarragon. After my first bite, I was in heaven. All I could think of while savoring this creation was that this recipe would be ideal to serve for brunch or for a special breakfast when we have overnight guests. It was simple, yet sophisticated, and didn't take long to assemble or bake.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
Thanks to a new union, peregrine falcons eggs are being incubated again high on a ledge of the United States Fidelity & Guaranty building at the Inner Harbor as they have every year since 1984.Only a few weeks ago, the seven-year string of springtime eggs and hatchings of the relatively rare birds seemed likely to be broken.Blythe, the resident female falcon since 1984, disappeared around March 1 and was found dead April 20, apparently having starved after becoming immobilized.But then, about two weeks after Blythe's disappearance, a new female -- who has recently been named Felicity -- appeared.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1994
In a very small way, Mrs. Jaroslava Solhan can hold the essence of her Ukrainian homeland in the palm of her hand.And she passes the soul of her native country along to friends, family and people who know little of her country's story other than the loveliness of the patterns and symbols with which she decorates traditional Easter eggs.All year long, in her home in Curtis Bay, she turns out glowing examples of the traditional craft. There are large goose eggs, duck eggs, grade A extra-large eggs; each one with a rich and colorful coat that celebrates the season.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
Spying a cluster of pink eggs under a bush, 5-year-old Heather Haynes stealthily slipped into the best position to seize them the moment the hunt began.The green lawn outside Resurrection Lutheran Church in Brooklyn Park was littered with plastic, multicolored eggs. Yellow eggs bobbed from branches in evergreens, purple eggs poked out among the crocuses and lime green eggs nestled under shrubs.But Heather alone took care of dozens of them. "Look at all of these," she cried, snatching up the plastic eggs containing candy and prizes.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
Thomas Martin Cunningham, who spent nearly 60 years delivering eggs to homes and neighborhood stores throughout Baltimore and Baltimore County, died of a heart attack Monday at his Towson residence. He was 71. Family members said that Mr. Cunningham had been delivering eggs since the age of 12. He died in the early afternoon after completing his usual morning circuit selling eggs. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Hamilton and Baynesville neighborhoods, Mr. Cunningham started selling eggs when his father, a milkman who also had an egg business, died of leukemia at 41, leaving a wife and seven children.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
On a brisk April day in East Baltimore, laundry flapping like fresh spring flags, the sun lights up a tiny rowhouse that is ``TC jewel box of Ukrainian culture. Entering the home of John and Luba Rad, you are struck by the meticulous arrangements of folk embroidery, ceramics and wood carvings. There is a portrait of poet Taras Shevchenko and a mosaic of Cossack warrior Taras Bulba.What you notice most, however, are the eggs.Luba Rad holds an Easter egg as intricately detailed as an illuminated manuscript, colors sparkling like gems.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | April 4, 2004
Add some decorative Easter touches to your home before the big day. Find an assortment of cutesy, novel and functional Easter products at various shops and online stores. At www.redenvelope. com, you can pick up an adorable Ornament Tree ($18, far right, top), made of wrought iron. It holds eight ornaments and can easily serve as a centerpiece for any table. Ornaments are not included. At RedEnvelope, you'll also find an Egg Wreath ($48, above, top), with dozens of faux eggs nestled in a base of woven vines.
FEATURES
By Lorna J. Sass and Lorna J. Sass,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 12, 1995
When eggs start appearing in their coats of many colors, and children begin parading home from school with their dainty, grass-filled baskets, we don't have to look at our calendars to know that it's Easter once again. For eggs are a symbol of Easter; it wouldn't feel quite like Easter if there weren't any brightly colored eggs about it.The association of Easter with eggs is one we take for granted nowadays, but the connection has intrigued many folklorists. What is it about the egg that makes it such an ideal symbol of this particular holiday?
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | September 8, 1993
Q: I have read that eggs scramble better at room temperature. Isn't it dangerous to let them sit out to bring them to that temperature?A: It is dangerous to let eggs sit out for long periods of time at room temperature, so a quick trick is to sit the egg, in its shell in lukewarm water for a few minutes.Q: I have recently seen many new types of mushrooms available in my supermarket's produce department. How can I prepare them to see if I will like them?A: The best way to bring out the full flavors of individual mushrooms is to saute them quickly in a little olive oil or butter and, if not doing simply a mushroom tasting, you might use them to top something bland such as a sauteed chicken breast.
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