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Eggs

FEATURES
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 6, 2004
MOSCOW -- An American-owned collection of Faberge eggs, some of the world's priciest knickknacks, has been bought by a Russian businessman who pledges to bring them home -- to the delight of Russia's art world. "We must all celebrate, because it's a wonderful event," Mikhail B. Piotrovsky, director of the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, said yesterday in a telephone interview. "It's very important for the historical memory of Russia." Nine of the gold-enameled and jewel-encrusted eggs, symbols of the doomed opulence of the czarist era, were sold along with 180 other Faberge artifacts Wednesday by the family of publishing magnate Malcolm Forbes.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | April 7, 2005
BOSTON - It's no surprise that the debate about cloning research has turned a degree or two from focusing on the moral status of the egg to the moral status of the egg donor. Up to now, we've treated eggs as if they were disembodied commodities. You go to a biology supermarket, pick up a dozen extra large and trundle them off to the research lab. But so far there's only one source for the hundreds of eggs needed for the stem cell research that uses cloned embryos: women. Egg donors are likely to undergo the same treatment as women do for in vitro fertilization.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
At this time of year, back in the old days, the Easter cry sailed through the alleys of Baltimore."Who's got an egg?Who's got an egg?Chicken with a wooden leg!Who's got a guinea-ghi?Who's gonna pick-a-me?"The challenge was one of a basket full of Easter traditions peculiar to Baltimore, rituals that included parades, butter shaped like lambs, and Easter Monday picnics in Druid Hill Park; customs that have faded with time.The cry of "Who's got an egg?" would bring youngsters out of their homes, ready to do battle with hard-boiled eggs dyed in shades of blue and pink and yellow.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | December 12, 2007
Is a smaller egg commercially available? It seems chicken eggs have gone from large to super jumbo over the years. I'm not asking for quail eggs, just a smaller alternative. Eggs are classed in sizes based on weight by the dozen: peewee, small, medium, large, extra-large and jumbo. Peewee, small and jumbo rarely show up in supermarkets, but medium, large and extra-large are usually available. Medium might be what you need. The size of a chicken's egg is affected by its age, the breed and environmental factors, such as heat and stress.
NEWS
April 2, 1993
For the third year in a row, Steger's Farm Fresh Eggs of Hampstead is offering hard-boiled, dyed eggs during the Easter season."We thought it was something unique to do," said Evan Fogerty, Steger's marketing manager. "A lot of people like to dye their own eggs, and we think that's great. But for those who haven't had the opportunity, this is a real benefit to them."Plastic six-packs, complete with artificial grass, sell for 99 cents to $1.09, he said. Locally, the eggs are available at George's IGA, Miller's Market, Westminster Co-op, Weis and Giant.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | June 27, 2007
How do you boil an egg correctly? No matter what I do, I can never peel them easily. This question came from a colleague who buys her eggs fresh from the farmers' market. That is precisely why she has trouble peeling them: The fresher the egg, the harder it will be to peel. Young eggs are better for applications where you want a compact egg, as in frying and poaching. Older eggs, besides being better candidates for hard-cooking, also are fine for scrambling and using for baking. Most eggs make it to the market within a few days of being packed.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 5, 1993
Q: Should I pay attention to my wife when she says that we should not order Caesar salads in restaurants?A: The easy answer is to tell you that you should always listen to what your wife says. She may not be right on every occasion, but it is true that Caesar salad dressing, made with raw eggs, has been responsible for many outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness due to contamination of eggs with salmonella bacteria.These bacteria pose no threat when eggs are properly cooked, but salmonella may infect the intestine if you eat foods containing raw or undercooked eggs.
FEATURES
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS and BRITTANY BAUHAUS,SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2006
Bunnies and eggs aren't exactly the most logical match. Yet, the tradition remains that every spring a rabbit totes a basket filled with brilliantly colored eggs. So how did the egg come to represent Easter? Laurie Harrsen, a McCormick spice representative, offered many ideas about how the Easter egg came to be, though she noted that nothing is certain. "We have heard a [bunch] of ideas regarding the history of Easter eggs," she said. One theory is that Pope Paul V [1605-1621] blessed the egg in a prayer to be used in England, Scotland and Ireland.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | April 2, 1993
Steger's Farm Fresh Eggs, one of the few egg companies that market under their own names, has a strong consumer following, marketing manager Evan Fogerty told a group of farmers and business people yesterday.Speaking at the monthly agribusiness breakfast meeting, Mr. Fogerty credited the Hampstead-based company's success to quality and name recognition."Maryland consumers really do want Maryland eggs," he said. "Last year, one chain left us and it only took two weeks for them to get educated.
NEWS
By Frank D.Roylance and Frank D.Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1990
Chances are, the eggs in the batter you lick from the beater tonight, or the ones you'll fry "over easy" tomorrow, won't kill you, or even make you sick.But federal officials are worried enough about the spread of a mutant salmonella bacterium in the nation's egg supply that they want state and local authorities to crack down on food handlers who don't take the threat seriously.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently designated eggs a "potentially hazardous food," capable of supporting the growth of dangerous Salmonella enteritidis bacteria if not stored and cooked properly.
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