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Eggs

FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | July 24, 1991
Every time someone gives advice on how to avoid salmonella food poisoning, he or she suggests substituting pasteurized eggs that have been heated to kill the bacteria rather than the troublesome raw eggs.Good advice. But pasteurized eggs just haven't been readily available for the home cook locally.The wait is almost over. Table Ready Egg, a pasteurized and homogenized whole egg product from Papetti's Hygrade Egg Products Inc. of Elizabeth, N.J., should be in the dairy cases of Baltimore's major chain supermarkets right after Labor Day, according to president Arthur Papetti.
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NEWS
By VIRGINIA JOHNSON | September 25, 1991
A recent article announces the marketing, by a large food chain,of ''hand-gathered eggs from free-roaming hens.'' These eggs come from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and are priced at a dollar more a dozen than other eggs. Apparently, the theory is that eggs from penned-up hens cost less to produce, and the consumer will like the idea of eating liberated eggs enough to pay the extra money.If this proves to be true, I wish that my aunt and uncle, who lived on a farm in Frederick County, could still be alive to cash in. They had the most deliriously happy hens you could imagine.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | April 8, 2001
Even before there was an Easter, there were decorated eggs. Pagans used them in spring festivals. Many ancient cultures dyed eggs, exchanged them and generally considered them symbols of fertility. Their link to Easter is centuries old -- a simple yet colorful symbol of man's rebirth. To celebrate the season, The Sun asked a handful of people -- all with links to eggs -- to try their hand at decorating an egg or two for Easter. The results ranged from the traditional dye job (shades of the eternal Paas)
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | March 20, 2005
Easter's on its way. And you have some preparing to do around the house. So find an array of decorative, functional and, yes, adorable Easter items at area shops and online stores. Now get hopping. 1, 2, 3. At Williams-Sonoma at Towson Town Center, Cross Keys and Annapolis Mall and at www.williams-sonoma.com, you'll find the cutesy Chick Plates ($39 for four) and Chick Ramekins ($36 for four). The egg-shaped earthenware plates and ramekins -- each set includes an aqua, daffodil, rose and lime-colored item -- feature a tiny embossed chick and tiny chick tracks.
NEWS
By BARBARA MALLONEE | March 30, 1991
At midnight, the house smells of vinegar. On the kitchen table dry eggs dyed red and green and lavender and a blue as bright as a sky in early spring. The cat licks a purple paw, and I puzzle how to mail eggs out to Ohio, and why.The head of the household has gone to bed, shaking his head. Cards and calls are his way of keeping in touch with college-age children, who come and go as they always have, but in longer and longer leaps. For months at a time, we live here and they live there. They sound plaintive when they call, wistful when they write.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
On Sunday morning, as Christians in the region and around the world take part in the Easter traditions they enjoy, an observer might be tempted to ask: How do the ways they celebrate the holiday reflect its meaning? Children pet bunnies and gobble jelly beans. Wal-Mart sells more than 500 types of Easter confection, including unicorn- and space alien-themed baskets. Just a few of them allude to Christianity. How does eating a package of Peeps recall the man Christians believe redeemed the world by rising from the dead nearly 2,000 years ago?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Baltimore's most famous peregrine falcons have hatched a new family on a 33rd-floor ledge of a downtown office tower, completing one of the city's local rites of spring.Felicity, the aerie's current female occupant, hatched three eggs over the weekend. Two more contain chicks that are peeping."They're calling, and we're expecting those to hatch at any hour," said John Barber. He is a former Smithsonian Institution ornithologist whose employment at USF&G Corp. made him the perfect choice to study and protect the birds after the first one settled in 1978 at the company's office tower at Lombard and Light streets.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
Nine small turtle eggs dug from the shores of Columbia's Lake Elkhorn in early July have produced penny-sized, non-native false map turtles normally found along the Mississippi River, raising concern that the species may have invaded Columbia. "Maybe there is a breeding pair of turtles in the lake," said Ray Bosmans of Clarksville, president of the Howard based Mid-Atlantic Turtle and Tortoise Society, but that's not clear. Because everything about turtles seems to move in slow motion, Bosmans said the mother could have mated more than a year before she laid the eggs, perhaps before someone left her in the wilds of Columbia.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,Chicago Tribune | October 31, 1990
When it comes to the latest salmonella scare, it's the eggs that are causing most of the confusion.By this time most Americans are aware that 30 percent or more of the country's poultry probably is contaminated with some salmonella bacteria and thus must be cooked thoroughly before eating, according to government estimates. But there aren't many people out there craving raw chicken.Not so with eggs. Raw and partly cooked eggs are essential ingredients in homemade mayonnaise, hollandaise, Caesar salad, ice cream, egg nog, mousse and meringue, not to mention those three-minute, soft-boiled eggs and the sunnyside-up ones with the runny yolks.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | September 8, 1992
Q: Should I pay attention to my wife when she says that we should not order Caesar salads in restaurants?A: The easy answer is to tell you that you should always listen to what your wife says. She may not be right on every occasion, but it is true that Caesar salad dressing, made with raw eggs, has been responsible for many outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness due to contamination of eggs with Salmonella bacteria. These bacteria pose no threat when eggs are properly cooked, but Salmonella may infect the intestine if you eat foods containing raw or under-cooked eggs.
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