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HEALTH
By Elaine Pelc, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Elaine Pelc weighs in on eggs. Are eggs really incredible? Yes! Eggs are affordable, a great source of lean protein, full of vitamins and minerals and low in calories, weighing in at about 70 calories each. Over the years eggs have received a bad rap for their cholesterol content.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Local chefs share cool, creative uses for the kitchen staple. By Kit Waskom Pollard Eggs can do it all. Equally at home as breakfast on the go or as the centerpiece of an elegant dinner, it's no wonder that the simple ingredient holds a special place in chefs' hearts. Here, four local chefs share their favorite egg preparations, ranging from a simple crab omelet to delicate, sophisticated croquettes. Egg Yolk Croquettes with Bacon, Comté & Truffle Yields 6 servings In the Lord Baltimore Hotel's restaurant, The French Kitchen, Chef Jordan Miller experiments with high-tech toys, turning out dishes that combine ambition with great flavor - such as these carefully constructed croquettes in heady cheese-truffle-bacon sauce.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Moonstruck is a great food movie. Nicholas Cage on bread, the making of eggs, the great meeting scene in the restaurant with Olympia Dukakis and John Mahoney. Moonstruck opens the 13th Annual Little Italy Film Festival tonight. By the way, I'm looking for a good photograph of those eggs. There are lots of recipes online. My favorite thing in the whole movie is Loretta Castorini's take on the Marc Chagall: " It's kind of little gaudy, don't you think?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Historically, the concept of the diner was fairly straightforward. No-frills food, quick service, huge menu, lots of coffee. In recent years, however, that definition has been expanded and tweaked, as chefs have embraced "upscale" diner food and Guy Fieri roamed the country, shining his "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" spotlight on restaurants that don't traditionally fill any of those shoes. The Weekender, a self-billed "country diner," appears to be one of this new breed of restaurant.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 19, 2010
I would like to know if anyone still darns socks. Please call and leave your name and number at 410-332-6166. It's for a study I've launched — how many Americans darn socks in the 21st Century. Please specify if you've always been a darner or if you've taken up the craft since the Great Recession. That's important to the study. Of course, if you're of a certain age, you don't even know what I'm talking about. In downloading the Beatles' "Eleanor Rigby," you might have heard reference to Father McKenzie "darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | December 24, 2012
Yes, the Baltimore Farmers' Market is done for the season. It won't be back until April 7. But you get fresh eggs from the Hen's Nest all winter long. The New Windsor farm will be bringing cartons and cases of its brown and white eggs down to Baltimore every other week Saturday beginning Jan. 5, making three stops around the city. The first stop, from 8 a.m.-9 a.m., will be at the parking lot of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, 1400 W. Coldspring Lane. Then, the truck will head east, to 3700 Dillon St., near the Natty Boh sign, where it will park on the parking lot in front of the Push 511 crossfit gym from 9:30 a.m.-11 a.m. From noon-1 p.m., you can get Hen's Nest eggs at the Park & Ride off Rolling Road (Route 166)
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Just a comment about Gov. Martin O'Malley's forecast of hard times for Maryland if sequestration comes to pass: Perhaps the governor should have been working harder all along to improve the industrial diversity in the state instead of working so hard to bring more and more government to Maryland. August J. Nicastro, Forest Hill
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Eggs can do it all. Equally at home as breakfast on the go or as the centerpiece of an elegant dinner, it's no wonder that the simple ingredient holds a special place in chefs' hearts. Here, four local chefs share their favorite egg preparations, ranging from a simple crab omelet to delicate, sophisticated croquettes. Egg Yolk Croquettes with Bacon, Comte & Truffle Yields 6 servings In the Lord Baltimore Hotel's restaurant, The French Kitchen, Chef Jordan Miller experiments with high-tech toys, turning out dishes that combine ambition with great flavor - such as these carefully constructed croquettes in heady cheese-truffle-bacon sauce.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2012
A New York company that makes vanilla rugelach sold in Maryland stores is recalling the product because it contains undeclared eggs, which may cause a life-threatening illness if consumed by anyone with an allergy or severe sensitivity to eggs. Bloch's Best Inc., doing business as Laromme of Monsey, N.Y., is pulling its Laromme brand vanilla rugelach because the 14-oz. round containers do not list eggs among the ingredients. The product was distributed in stores in Massachusetts, Maryland and New Jersey, according to the release posted on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration website.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Ellen Carpenter delayed marriage until she found Mr. Right, but by that time she was 38 years old, making it much more difficult to have children. After getting pregnant with the help of hormone injections, the Frederick County resident lost the baby — a girl with severe body malformations — in the first trimester. She explored other options and chose to use frozen eggs from a donor. Today, Carpenter is the mother of a rambunctious 18-month-old named Zachary. A growing number of women are turning to frozen eggs to solve their fertility problems as the controversial procedure that long raised safety concerns slowly gains acceptance.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 30, 2014
Like Thanksgiving, Labor Day is a national holiday. Unlike Thanksgiving, it does not have an official meal. One-hundred-and-twenty years on, it's time we had one. I'm nominating the peppers-and-eggs sandwich as the official meal of Labor Day, and I'll tell you why in a moment. First, some declarations. 1. Most people only think of Labor Day as a day off at the end of summer, or a good day to buy a dishwasher. Lost is its original meaning: a "national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity and well-being of our country.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 14, 2014
Inner city kids appear to suffer more from food allergies than the general population, according to new research lead by Johns Hopkins Children's Center . Researchers had already found that kids in four large cities are more vulnerable to asthma and environmental allergies. The new findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , show 10 percent of the kids were allergic to milk, eggs or peanuts, the three most common food allergens. Just six percent of kids nationally are allergic to these foods, according to National Institute of Health estimates.
BUSINESS
By June Arney, For The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
As private-sector companies that offer traditional pensions grow scarce, individuals are left to navigate retirement savings largely on their own, often turning to employer-sponsored 401(k) programs to help create a nest egg. Those who don't can turn to Individual Retirement Accounts offered by many financial institutions. Whether people tap into programs through an employer or use other vehicles, what is important is taking that first step toward security, financial planners say. "Saving something, even later in life, is far preferable to throwing up your hands and doing nothing," said David C. John, senior strategic policy adviser AARP Public Policy Institute.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
On Sunday morning, as Christians in the region and around the world take part in the Easter traditions they enjoy, an observer might be tempted to ask: How do the ways they celebrate the holiday reflect its meaning? Children pet bunnies and gobble jelly beans. Wal-Mart sells more than 500 types of Easter confection, including unicorn- and space alien-themed baskets. Just a few of them allude to Christianity. How does eating a package of Peeps recall the man Christians believe redeemed the world by rising from the dead nearly 2,000 years ago?
NEWS
April 9, 2014
Easter Eggs hunts will be going on throughout Carroll County starting on Saturday. Area residents are invited to bring their children to the following: April 12 • A children's Easter Celebration and Egg Hunt will take place at 10 a.m. for children age 3 to fifth grade, at Westminster Baptist Church, 354 Crest Lane, Westminster. 410-848-6330 • An Easter Adventure Egg Hunt will be held at Charlotte's Quest Nature Center, 3400 Wilhelm Lane, Manchester, at 10 a.m. for children up to age 12. There will be four age groups - walking to 3, 4 to 6, 7 to 8, and 9 to 12 - with a prize egg in designated hunt areas.
NEWS
By Loni Ingraham | March 31, 2014
While scouring tables for tome treasures during the annual Friends of Towson Library book sale April 10 to 13, buyers can hunt for something else of value this year: dragon eggs. Each egg entitles the finder to a free or discounted book. The eggs are the theoretical offspring of the Towson Dragon, the playable art creature adorning the library's former faux fish pond, which provides a whimsical environment for teaching literacy to youngsters. The eggs will be hidden among the thousands of gently used, donated fiction and nonfiction books, CDs and DVDs available at the Friends sale, which will be held in the building's downstairs Wilson and Towson meeting rooms, and which benefits the Towson branch.
FEATURES
By Jodi Noding and Jodi Noding,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | March 27, 1991
To many people, spring means Easter and that means eggs. Here are some safety tips for those planning to dye Easter eggs:* If you hard-cook eggs that are at least a week old, you will find them easier to peel after they are cooked.* Be sure to refrigerate eggs you plan to dye as much as possible between cooking, cooling, dyeing and hiding. Do not eat cracked eggs or ones that have been out of the refrigerator for more than two hours.* If you plan to use the decorated eggs as a decoration and they will be unrefrigerated for several days, cook extra eggs for eating and discard the display eggs.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | April 2, 1997
A breakfast of eggs is a perfectly good way to start the day, scientists now say. Provided, of course, that you don't overdo a good thing.Eggs got a bad rap in the '60s and '70s when it was believed that cholesterol was the major cause of coronary heart disease. Now, the emphasis is on saturated fat and total dietary fat. And eggs, in moderation, are being rediscovered for their protein and vitamin content.The American Heart Association recommends that adults who don't have elevated cholesterol limit their egg intake to four a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Even in frigid weather, Ginger Myers' pigs are happy. "As cold as it gets, the pigs are out there, snorting and playing like kids bundled up and running around," says the owner of Evermore Farm , a family-owned livestock and produce farm in Westminster. Myers is one of many farmers in the Baltimore area who believe that running a farm under the principles of "good stewardship" is the right approach for farmers, animals, consumers and the region as a whole. Myers defines good stewardship as "the ethic of doing the best management we can - that's what we're doing from birth to plate.
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