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NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | January 9, 2008
My granddaughter is allergic to both egg whites and egg yolks. What can I use as a substitute in cakes and cookies? Vegan recipes often use soft or silken tofu as an egg substitute. There also are products in health-food stores, such as Ener-G egg replacer. Of course, eggs do many things in baked goods - binding, thickening and holding air to act as leaveners are just a few. So not all replacements will work in all recipes. It may be easier to find recipes that already are formulated to not include eggs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Patricia O'Neill from Granger, Ind., was seeking a recipe for making rolled sponge cake filled with strawberry-flavored whipped cream. She said she enjoyed this cake at a wedding when she was a child and has tried to reproduce it but has always failed miserably. I located a delicious and relatively easy recipe for a strawberries-and-cream sponge cake roll on noemptychairs.me , a blog about "good food and good times around the kitchen table," written by Kelly Smith from Pittsburgh.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2008
Pam Kelleman of Phoenix was looking for a recipe for a layer cake that was served at the now-closed Pimlico Hotel restaurant in Baltimore. She was hoping a reader would have the "original" recipe for the cake. Unfortunately, I did not receive any responses, but I happened to notice that Atwater's bakery at Belvedere Square makes a version of this hometown favorite. Ned Atwater was kind enough to modify his Pimlico cake recipe for the home baker. I tested his cake, and it was just as Kelleman described the original: a yellow chiffon layer cake filled with Bavarian custard and iced with a rich chocolate frosting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Bettie Vogt of Bend, Ore., was looking for a lemon pie recipe to replace one that has been a family favorite for more than 30 years. Her original recipe from the Eagle brand milk company called for the use of raw eggs yolks, but she is no longer comfortable serving a pie that contains raw eggs. I found a luscious recipe for a lemon cream pie on the Eagle Brand website (www.eaglebrand.com) that is made without raw egg yolks. The yolks in this recipe are fully cooked, and the cooled pie is topped with whipped cream.
FEATURES
September 3, 1997
In Recipe Finder for Aug. 27, an ingredient in the zabaglione sauce was incorrect. The correct ingredient is 4 egg yolks, not 4 egg whites. Instructions for preparing are correct.
FEATURES
July 24, 1996
In last week's Recipe Finder, 1 cup of sugar was omitted from the ingredients list for the million dollar pie. However, instructions for making the pie specifically called for 1/2 -cup sugar to be added to egg yolks and the remaining 1/2 -cup sugar added to the egg whites, which may have been sufficient instructions for those interested in making the pie.
FEATURES
By Newsday | August 25, 1999
This recipe to feed a crowd, from "Dinner at Miss Lady's: Memories and Recipes From a Southern Childhood" by Luann Landon (Algonquin Books, $19.95), uses egg yolks with wild abandon. It is useful to know how to make a boiled dressing as well as a homemade mayonnaise; they make a simple dish like chicken salad company-worthy.Homemade MayonnaiseMakes 2 cups4 egg yolks2 cups light olive oil, peanut oil or canola oilsalt and pepper to taste2 tablespoons (or more, to taste) white-wine vinegarUsing an electric mixer and small bowl, beat egg yolks on low speed for 2 minutes.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2005
Vivian Borden from Santa Margarita, Calif., was looking for a recipe for a spongecake that is baked in the traditional angel food or tube pan. She says that many people today seem to confuse a spongecake with an angel food cake. The primary difference between the two cakes is that an angel food cake never contains egg yolks, whereas a spongecake should contain either whole eggs or a combination of yolks and beaten egg whites with the addition of a leavening agent. Jean Peterson from Independence, Ore., sent us her spongecake recipe that she has used for more than 35 years.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | January 13, 1999
The request of Yvonne B. of Sioux Falls, S.D., was short and sweet. "Do you have a recipe for homemade chocolate mousse? Thank you."Evie Sakers of Westminster responded. "This chocolate mousse has been in our family many years, as my husband is a big chocolate fan. It's easy to make and can be made one day ahead. Keeps well for several days when refrigerated. Hope you enjoy our chocolate mousse!"Chocolate MousseMakes 8-10 servings2 (8-ounce) packages chocolate chips1/4 cup brandy or water5 egg yolks, beaten1 cup egg whites (6-8 egg whites)
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2002
If your dessert choices are either vanilla or chocolate, it's time to discover the old-fashioned goodness of butterscotch. It's possible you haven't tasted its rich, deep flavor in years. Unfortunately, butterscotch isn't a trendy taste right now. But once you taste the mellow combination of butter, brown sugar and milk, butterscotch will become a favorite. You can dress butterscotch up or down. The most simple, and perhaps most comforting, dessert is plain pudding. If that's too spare, try butterscotch over a store-bought coffee cake, apple cake or pound cake.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2009
Tess Coker from Bend, Ore., has been trying to locate a recipe similar to the one she once had for making an eggnog tart or tartlets. Christie McVie from Knoxville, Tenn., sent in a recipe she likes very much from the November 2004 issue of Gourmet magazine for a Cranberry Eggnog Tart. She said she tried this dessert when she first saw the recipe and it has become a standard at her holiday gatherings. While the recipe may seem a bit complicated at first glance, it really is not all that difficult.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2009
Rosie Ahern of Willits, Calif., was looking for a recipe for pineapple squares that she remembers from her childhood. Her mother, who baked bread on a weekly basis, came across the recipe on a package of Fleischmann's yeast. Barbara Davis of Salisbury sent in the recipe she believes is likely the one Ahern was searching for. The photocopy she sent in appears to be from a magazine advertisement for Fleischmann's yeast. She says she has had it since it was published back in the 1950s and it is still a favorite with her family today.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | March 18, 2009
This year, more than others, we've declared war on wasting food. To help with the fight, we've come up with 20 ingredients that can be hard to use up before they go bad. Here are quick (and a few not-so-quick) ideas for putting them to delicious purpose. Keep the list on your fridge, and hopefully you'll never have to toss half a container of these staples again. When in doubt, turn to our quintet of favorite use-up dishes: frittata, fried rice, omelet, stir-fries, soup. They can take on many of the ingredients on our list.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2008
Pam Kelleman of Phoenix was looking for a recipe for a layer cake that was served at the now-closed Pimlico Hotel restaurant in Baltimore. She was hoping a reader would have the "original" recipe for the cake. Unfortunately, I did not receive any responses, but I happened to notice that Atwater's bakery at Belvedere Square makes a version of this hometown favorite. Ned Atwater was kind enough to modify his Pimlico cake recipe for the home baker. I tested his cake, and it was just as Kelleman described the original: a yellow chiffon layer cake filled with Bavarian custard and iced with a rich chocolate frosting.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Donna Deane and Amy Scattergood and Donna Deane,Los Angeles Times | July 9, 2008
For a gorgeous finale to a casual meal out on the patio - under the lingering heat and lengthening rays of the sun - offer a slice of frozen flourless cake layered with a luscious hazelnut semifreddo and the golden pixie dust of crushed homemade praline. To save time, you can buy the praline, too, but the candy takes minutes to make and yields the kind of sultry, caramel flavor that's worth the effort. This simple terrine looks more complicated than it is; the entire confection can be made ahead of time.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | May 7, 2008
Mayonnaise is so easy to buy. But what lots of people don't know is that it's almost as easy to make, and can be dressed up as a sophisticated accompaniment to the vegetables coming off your grill. "If you can make a base mayonnaise, you can expand your sauce repertoire to 25 sauces," says Baltimore International College chef instructor Michael Wagner. Start with room-temperature egg yolks for a stronger emulsion, Wagner says. (If raw eggs worry you, use pasteurized yolks.) For a mild mayonnaise, use vegetable oil rather than olive oil, which can turn the mayonnaise green and adds stronger flavor.
FEATURES
By Richard Sax and Richard Sax,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 22, 1995
Simple puddings, custards and souffles are actually variations on a soothing theme. The simplest puddings are starch-thickened mixtures (usually made with milk and sometimes with eggs) stirred in a saucepan until smooth. A true custard, on the other hand, is set by eggs alone and baked. And souffle is nothing more than a custard-like base that's lightened with beaten egg whites, baked and served immediately.Coffee Cup Creme CaramelStephen Lyle, chef of Odeon in New York City, bakes his creme caramel in thick restaurant coffee cups; any ramekins or heat-proof custard cups will work fine.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 3, 1997
Doing things the "same old way" at this time of year is valued, at least by some of us. Those of us who treasure the old ways might call ourselves "traditionalists." Others refer to us as "fogeys."The first time I was called a fogey by one of my kids, I was offended. But now, rather than fight the characterization of being someone who is behind the times, I embrace it. If the world is divided between "cool" people who are "with-it" and "fogeys" who are "out-of-it," I am much more comfortable in the second group.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | January 9, 2008
My granddaughter is allergic to both egg whites and egg yolks. What can I use as a substitute in cakes and cookies? Vegan recipes often use soft or silken tofu as an egg substitute. There also are products in health-food stores, such as Ener-G egg replacer. Of course, eggs do many things in baked goods - binding, thickening and holding air to act as leaveners are just a few. So not all replacements will work in all recipes. It may be easier to find recipes that already are formulated to not include eggs.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | February 16, 2007
You invited readers who have had trouble with Ambien to write. I had two incidents in 2003 when I drove in my sleep while taking Ambien. Once, I bought a pack of cigarettes while I was out. I did not realize this until I saw them on the kitchen counter the next morning. In October of 2005, I went on a cruise. I took Ambien to get some sleep, but my roommate reported that I got up in the middle of the night and started walking around. I have not taken any more Ambien, because I am afraid of what I might do. We keep hearing from people who sleepwalk or even sleep-drive while taking Ambien.
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