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NEWS
By The Los Angeles Times | April 26, 1991
BEFORE Americans throw up their hands in despair over the nation's education system and how poorly it compares to overseas competitors, it's important to remember that what each state public education system is trying to do is unprecedented in human history: to educate massive numbers of children from all economic backgrounds, from every ethnic, racial and religious group, those native born and those who arrived just last month.It is a mammoth, and, yes, noble undertaking that no other nation has even attempted.
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NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | August 29, 2014
Since at least the 1970s, there has been little for unions to celebrate on Labor Day. The giant teachers unions - the National Education Association (NEA) and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) - have been an exception, largely retaining their size and influence. But now even teachers unions are an endangered species. This June a California judge ruled that the tenure and seniority provisions in teachers collective bargaining agreements were unconstitutional. These contractual benefits for teachers, the judge wrote, impose "a real and appreciable impact on students' fundamental right to equality of education and… a disproportionate burden on poor and minority students.
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NEWS
October 4, 2007
Amid news about the often-dismal state of Baltimore's schools, George Washington Elementary School has been an emerging example of excellence. Last December, it was named a state Blue Ribbon school, and this week, it was honored by the federal Department of Education as a national Blue Ribbon school. While the designation is a tribute to everyone associated with George Washington, the school should be the norm in the city, not an aberration. Located in a low-income area of Baltimore near Camden Yards with about 250 prekindergarten through fifth-grade students, George Washington is rightly being recognized for academic strength while also offering proof that the achievement gap, mainly among minority and white students, can be bridged.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | August 5, 2014
The land along the northern edge of the Patapsco serves as the front porch to a bejeweled coastline, the product of a re-making of Baltimore's Inner Harbor in a manner and to a degree that could have hardly been imagined a generation ago. And then, several blocks north, in the once commercially vibrant area of Waverly, standing in considerable contrast, there is McKenzie Elliott's front porch. When a three-year-old is shot to death while merely indulging in the act of sitting on her own front porch on a summer afternoon, the magnificence and grandeur of the renewal of our city is dimmed and diminished.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
TWICE NOW, within a span of exactly two decades, The Sun has published ambitious news series about what makes effective schools - schools that work regardless of race, wealth and other factors. Both times the newspaper asked Johns Hopkins University researchers to crunch test scores in a search for mavericks - those schools that exceed expectations. Both times, Sun reporters visited successful schools to see what was in the water. Coincidentally, both resulting series were titled "Schools That Work."
NEWS
By SARA ENGRAM | April 11, 1993
In 1979, Ron Edmonds, an influential educational researcher, set forth a simple proposition that flatly contradicted many of the assumptions that influence the way schools work.In an article on effective schools for the urban poor he said: "We can, whenever and wherever we choose, successfully teach all children whose schooling is of interest to us."He didn't say that we need to find new ways to deal with these problem students. Or that under the right circumstances we can succeed more often with these kids.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | April 28, 1991
Jerome Clark's career rise was steady and conventional until 1985, when it turned meteoric.John A. Murphy had just become Prince George's County's new superintendent of schools. He had pledged to revolutionize a second-class school system that was predominantly black after more than a decade of white flight, and he was looking for help. He decided Jerome Clark had the right stuff."I liked his management style. I liked his aggressive nature," said Dr. Murphy. "He was the kind of person who was willing to disagree and challenge and not be just a yes man."
NEWS
November 2, 1996
THERE'S NO disagreement that Baltimore City's public schools need more money. Virtually every study of the risk factors for academic failure point to the problems common to children raised in poverty. Since Baltimore City has the state's highest concentration of poor children, it is not surprising that it has more than its share of failing public schools.Unlike previous lawsuits that had to prove that city students were not getting an adequate education, the lawsuits currently pending before Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan don't carry that burden.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | September 21, 1997
WHEN WHITE HOUSE officials wanted a convenient place for President Clinton and Vice President Gore to showcase high standards, accountability and other elements of school reform, they had an easy choice -- Maryland.With its steady course through rocky political waters, Maryland has proved that it is possible to craft a vision and hold to it -- a goal that has eluded many other states. So when Congress was debating proposals for national testing earlier this month and the president and vice president wanted to visit schools to highlight the issue, they headed twice to Maryland, not Virginia.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | August 5, 2014
The land along the northern edge of the Patapsco serves as the front porch to a bejeweled coastline, the product of a re-making of Baltimore's Inner Harbor in a manner and to a degree that could have hardly been imagined a generation ago. And then, several blocks north, in the once commercially vibrant area of Waverly, standing in considerable contrast, there is McKenzie Elliott's front porch. When a three-year-old is shot to death while merely indulging in the act of sitting on her own front porch on a summer afternoon, the magnificence and grandeur of the renewal of our city is dimmed and diminished.
NEWS
October 4, 2007
Amid news about the often-dismal state of Baltimore's schools, George Washington Elementary School has been an emerging example of excellence. Last December, it was named a state Blue Ribbon school, and this week, it was honored by the federal Department of Education as a national Blue Ribbon school. While the designation is a tribute to everyone associated with George Washington, the school should be the norm in the city, not an aberration. Located in a low-income area of Baltimore near Camden Yards with about 250 prekindergarten through fifth-grade students, George Washington is rightly being recognized for academic strength while also offering proof that the achievement gap, mainly among minority and white students, can be bridged.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
Anne Arundel County officials said the announcement of 5,300 jobs at Fort Meade fits their belief that the western portion of the county will be a center for population and business growth over the next 20 years. "It's reassuring to have this confirmation of what I was expecting," said County Executive Janet S. Owens. The Pentagon announced Friday that Maryland would gain thousands of new jobs while losing just a handful of small installations under a massive proposed restructuring of the country's military bases.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2003
At the encouragement of the Harkins administration, Councilman Dion F. Guthrie has agreed to hold up -- at least temporarily -- on the introduction of a controversial bill designed to ease crowding in Harford County schools. Guthrie, a Democrat who represents the southern part of the county, said he was approached by the administration several days before he was set to file a bill that would change the county's Adequate Public Facilities laws so that they would halt housing construction in any area where enrollment in public schools exceeds 100 percent of the school's designed capacity.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
TWICE NOW, within a span of exactly two decades, The Sun has published ambitious news series about what makes effective schools - schools that work regardless of race, wealth and other factors. Both times the newspaper asked Johns Hopkins University researchers to crunch test scores in a search for mavericks - those schools that exceed expectations. Both times, Sun reporters visited successful schools to see what was in the water. Coincidentally, both resulting series were titled "Schools That Work."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2000
At Martin Boulevard Elementary School, small is beautiful: The eastern Baltimore County elementary does everything to teach reading in small groups or one on one. The school devotes so much attention to thinking small that its reading specialist's classroom has been split in two -- one side for the teacher to work with small groups of kids, the other side for a half-dozen cubicles for individual tutoring. Many elementaries would love to do this. Some use popular but expensive programs in which one teacher tutors just a few kids a day. But Martin Boulevard does it by hiring a handful of parents as tutors.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | September 21, 1997
WHEN WHITE HOUSE officials wanted a convenient place for President Clinton and Vice President Gore to showcase high standards, accountability and other elements of school reform, they had an easy choice -- Maryland.With its steady course through rocky political waters, Maryland has proved that it is possible to craft a vision and hold to it -- a goal that has eluded many other states. So when Congress was debating proposals for national testing earlier this month and the president and vice president wanted to visit schools to highlight the issue, they headed twice to Maryland, not Virginia.
NEWS
December 22, 1992
Constant FluxAs a parent with a child in the Baltimore City schools, I am extremely discouraged by the constant state of flux our political leaders and school administrators force upon our schools and the students they are supposed to serve.The result is a lot of wasted energy when such energy would be better spent trying to make some real improvements. Instead of focusing the attention on improving our schools, each successive move seems designed to bring the entire system down to the lowest common denominator.
NEWS
October 11, 1993
Carroll County got a deserved pat on the back last week from Nancy Grasmick, the state schools superintendent, for its success in meeting education goals at a moderate cost.Carroll's per-pupil cost for education is $600 less than the statewide average of $5,800. Yet Carroll is one of only two counties that last year met all 13 state standards for student performance. Those standards, contained in the annual fall "report card," include achievements on the functional knowledge tests, as well as attendance and promotion percentages.
NEWS
November 2, 1996
THERE'S NO disagreement that Baltimore City's public schools need more money. Virtually every study of the risk factors for academic failure point to the problems common to children raised in poverty. Since Baltimore City has the state's highest concentration of poor children, it is not surprising that it has more than its share of failing public schools.Unlike previous lawsuits that had to prove that city students were not getting an adequate education, the lawsuits currently pending before Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan don't carry that burden.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
ROCK HALL -- There's no single silver bullet in education. Where schools work, there are cartridges of little silver bullets. Some get there accidentally; some are carefully loaded, aimed and fired.Thus, Rock Hall Elementary School, one of the most effective schools in Maryland. Thus, Edward J. Silver Jr., a third-grade teacher at Rock Hall who was selected last month as Maryland's 1995 Teacher of the Year.There are no "bests," you'll notice, in the above paragraph. Education is uncomfortable with "bests."
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