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NEWS
November 29, 2012
Maryland courts can issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples starting in December, as long as the effective date is Jan. 1, according to an opinion issued this afternoon by Attorney General Doug Gansler. The 19-page opinion will likely lead to a slew of New Year's Eve weddings in the Free State, as gay couples who've long waited for the law to change can finally marry at midnight. It has been clear that Maryland's new law legalizing same-sex marriage would take effect Jan. 1 if approved at referendum, but many believed the first licenses would be issued a few days later because of the New Year holiday and a mandatory 48-hour waiting period.
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NEWS
November 29, 2012
Maryland courts can issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples starting in December, as long as the effective date is Jan. 1, according to an opinion issued this afternoon by Attorney General Doug Gansler. The 19-page opinion will likely lead to a slew of New Year's Eve weddings in the Free State, as gay couples who've long waited for the law to change can finally marry at midnight. It has been clear that Maryland's new law legalizing same-sex marriage would take effect Jan. 1 if approved at referendum, but many believed the first licenses would be issued a few days later because of the New Year holiday and a mandatory 48-hour waiting period.
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NEWS
By Maura Dolan and Maura Dolan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court has rejected petitions to delay its historic same-sex marriage decision, clearing the way for gay couples to marry later this month. The court's action yesterday on the case - which makes it possible for same-sex unions to begin June 17 - was unusually quick. Most appeals, even unsuccessful ones, trigger a 30- to 60-day delay in the effective date of a ruling. Acting in closed session, the court voted 4-3 to reject petitions by Christian groups that it reconsider its May 15 ruling.
NEWS
By Maura Dolan and Maura Dolan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court has rejected petitions to delay its historic same-sex marriage decision, clearing the way for gay couples to marry later this month. The court's action yesterday on the case - which makes it possible for same-sex unions to begin June 17 - was unusually quick. Most appeals, even unsuccessful ones, trigger a 30- to 60-day delay in the effective date of a ruling. Acting in closed session, the court voted 4-3 to reject petitions by Christian groups that it reconsider its May 15 ruling.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | October 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- If you own a home or some form of investment real estate and don't pay close attention to the daily political shenanigans on Capitol Hill, keep these two words in mind: capital gains.And while you're at it, you might want to focus on two other words that could mean thousands of dollars to you this year or next: effective date.The reason for extra attention is the pending Republican-sponsored 1995 tax legislation heading for final action between the House and Senate. Though President Clinton has threatened to veto either version of the bills in current form, the political reality is that to keep the federal government funded after mid-November, he and congressional Republicans will need to pass some form of compromise package.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 4, 2004
Anne Arundel County officials have until June 1 to assess the effects of a decision by Fort Meade to drastically reduce its 24-hour emergency services and instead rely on paramedics from surrounding counties, now that the Army has postponed the effective date until then. Originally scheduled to take effect tomorrow, the plan was put on hold last week - a decision that left critics hopeful that the Army will find another way to cut costs. "I think it [the delay] is a good move," said James Goetz, Fort Meade EMS spokesman.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
SafeNet Inc., the Belcamp network security company, said yesterday that it received a federal subpoena for information about stock option awards as well as an informal inquiry from the Securities and Exchange Commission. The SEC requested "information relating to stock option grants to directors and officers of the company, as well as information relating to certain accounting policies and practices," the company said in a statement. Federal officials this week have issued subpoenas to and launched investigations of several other publicly held companies regarding their stock options.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
After months of delay and intense opposition, a humanitarian organization has abandoned its plans to renovate a former state hospital in Marriottsville into an international aid complex.Harvest International Inc. said yesterday it would not proceed with its $5.6 million project for converting Henryton Hospital into the City of Hope, a nine-year project that would initially include a homeless shelter, drug rehabilitation center and training school.Eventually, the complex would have an international aid and warehouse distribution center.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | March 2, 1997
MANY HOMEOWNERS have begun peppering congressional and tax experts with questions about how to make use of the Clinton administration's proposed new capital gains reforms for home sellers.The Clinton plan would allow married individuals who file joint tax returns to pocket up to $500,000 of gain from the sale of a principal residence. Unmarried taxpayers, or married persons filing separately, could take up to $250,000 of profits tax-free.To answer some of the most frequent questions about the proposal and where it stands on Capitol Hill, here's a quick overview.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and TaNoah Morgan and Tom Bowman and TaNoah Morgan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Army has a message for officers and enlisted soldiers who are friends, lovers or business partners: Your days are numbered.As early as this week, the Army will impose stricter curbs on fraternization: personal relationships of any kind -- with the same or the opposite sex -- that could harm what soldiers refer to as "unit cohesion" and "good order and discipline."The new guidelines will bring the Army into line with the other services, which bar personal or business relationships between officers and the enlisted ranks, regardless of sex.For more than two decades, the Army has permitted such relationships between officers and lower-ranking soldiers so long as they were not in the same chain of command.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | May 19, 2006
SafeNet Inc., the Belcamp network security company, said yesterday that it received a federal subpoena for information about stock option awards as well as an informal inquiry from the Securities and Exchange Commission. The SEC requested "information relating to stock option grants to directors and officers of the company, as well as information relating to certain accounting policies and practices," the company said in a statement. Federal officials this week have issued subpoenas to and launched investigations of several other publicly held companies regarding their stock options.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 4, 2004
Anne Arundel County officials have until June 1 to assess the effects of a decision by Fort Meade to drastically reduce its 24-hour emergency services and instead rely on paramedics from surrounding counties, now that the Army has postponed the effective date until then. Originally scheduled to take effect tomorrow, the plan was put on hold last week - a decision that left critics hopeful that the Army will find another way to cut costs. "I think it [the delay] is a good move," said James Goetz, Fort Meade EMS spokesman.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and TaNoah Morgan and Tom Bowman and TaNoah Morgan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Army has a message for officers and enlisted soldiers who are friends, lovers or business partners: Your days are numbered.As early as this week, the Army will impose stricter curbs on fraternization: personal relationships of any kind -- with the same or the opposite sex -- that could harm what soldiers refer to as "unit cohesion" and "good order and discipline."The new guidelines will bring the Army into line with the other services, which bar personal or business relationships between officers and the enlisted ranks, regardless of sex.For more than two decades, the Army has permitted such relationships between officers and lower-ranking soldiers so long as they were not in the same chain of command.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
After months of delay and intense opposition, a humanitarian organization has abandoned its plans to renovate a former state hospital in Marriottsville into an international aid complex.Harvest International Inc. said yesterday it would not proceed with its $5.6 million project for converting Henryton Hospital into the City of Hope, a nine-year project that would initially include a homeless shelter, drug rehabilitation center and training school.Eventually, the complex would have an international aid and warehouse distribution center.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | March 2, 1997
MANY HOMEOWNERS have begun peppering congressional and tax experts with questions about how to make use of the Clinton administration's proposed new capital gains reforms for home sellers.The Clinton plan would allow married individuals who file joint tax returns to pocket up to $500,000 of gain from the sale of a principal residence. Unmarried taxpayers, or married persons filing separately, could take up to $250,000 of profits tax-free.To answer some of the most frequent questions about the proposal and where it stands on Capitol Hill, here's a quick overview.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1996
Police officials in Maryland and throughout the country are feverishly searching personnel files to comply with a new -- and little-known -- federal requirement that retroactively bars any officer convicted of a domestic-violence offense from carrying a gun.Law enforcement officials say it is too soon to tell how many police officers will be affected by the last-minute amendment to the main federal spending bill that went into effect Oct. 1.Because there...
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1996
Police officials in Maryland and throughout the country are feverishly searching personnel files to comply with a new -- and little-known -- federal requirement that retroactively bars any officer convicted of a domestic-violence offense from carrying a gun.Law enforcement officials say it is too soon to tell how many police officers will be affected by the last-minute amendment to the main federal spending bill that went into effect Oct. 1.Because there...
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2012
As a handful of undecided Maryland delegates wrestle over their position on same-sex marriage, they've received calls from national leaders trying to move them one way or another on the bill. Prominent figures dialing Maryland area codes include New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former Republican National Committee Chairman Ken Mehlman and Cardinal-elect Edwin F. O'Brien — who called from Rome — according to delegates who've received messages from them and sources familiar with the calls.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | October 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- If you own a home or some form of investment real estate and don't pay close attention to the daily political shenanigans on Capitol Hill, keep these two words in mind: capital gains.And while you're at it, you might want to focus on two other words that could mean thousands of dollars to you this year or next: effective date.The reason for extra attention is the pending Republican-sponsored 1995 tax legislation heading for final action between the House and Senate. Though President Clinton has threatened to veto either version of the bills in current form, the political reality is that to keep the federal government funded after mid-November, he and congressional Republicans will need to pass some form of compromise package.
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