Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEeoc
IN THE NEWS

Eeoc

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 27, 2011
An Ellicott City senior living facility is being sued for allegedly violating federal law for failing to hire a Muslim woman who would not remove her head scarf. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against Morningside House on behalf of Khadijah Salim on Monday. The lawsuit says Morningside House's director of health and wellness asked if Salim during a June 2010 interview if she would remove her religious headscarf, called a hijab, if she worked at the facility.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The owners of two popular restaurants in downtown Baltimore have agreed to pay $1.3 million and establish new hiring measures to settle a years-old lawsuit alleging racial discrimination against black applicants and employees. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed the lawsuit in 2008 against McCormick & Schmick's Seafood Restaurants Inc. and Schmick Restaurant Corp., owners of McCormick & Schmick's and M&S Grill in the Inner Harbor. The lawsuit claimed the restaurants violated the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by refusing to hire black applicants for front-of-the-house positions such as servers and hostesses.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2010
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has sued Ocean City's mayor and city council, accusing them of age discrimination, the federal agency announced Wednesday. The lawsuit alleges the resort town failed to hire Anthony Indge as full-time airport associate in 2008 because he was 62. Indge had been employed as a temporary line technician and filled in as an airport associate in 2007 and 2008. During Indge's interview for the full-time associate position, the airport manager made several "ageist comments" to Indge, according to the EEOC.
NEWS
By Mark Puente, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
After serving eight months in federal custody for his role in a towing scandal, former Baltimore police officer David Reeping is fighting to get his job back. Reeping contends that investigators used him as a scapegoat to avoid accusations of racial profiling from Hispanic and African-American officers convicted in the scandal, according to a complaint filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. "I was the token 'Caucasian' to stack the deck against them," Reeping told the commission, according to a copy of the claim obtained by The Baltimore Sun. A city lawyer called Reeping's allegations "absurd" and urged the commission to reject the claim, according to his correspondence with the commission.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Toys "R" Us, alleging the company broke the law when staff at its Columbia store refused to provide a sign-language interpreter for a job applicant who is deaf. The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, says the retailer discriminated against the woman, Shakirra Thomas, after she applied for a position at the store in 2011. It alleges the company violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires employers to provide "reasonable accommodations" for job applicants and workers with disabilities.
NEWS
November 23, 1990
Since the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission takes only 1 percent of the complaints filed with it to court, we are a little puzzled as to why Rudy Miller's case has become one of them. We are also more than a little concerned.Ms. Miller charges that WBAL-TV discriminated against her on the basis of sex while she was employed as what is generally referred to as a "celebrity anchorperson." EEOC says she was paid less than male anchorpersons performing "substantially equal work." Not offering "equal" pay for only "substantially equal" work hardly sounds unfair, much less illegal.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
An Anne Arundel County elementary school teacher was wrongfully terminated from his job because he is HIV-positive, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleges in its suit that Chesapeake Academy, a private school in Arnold, discriminated against the teacher because of his disability by not renewing his contract, a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The complaint was filed Monday in Baltimore. Chauncey Stevenson, a second-grade and after-school music teacher, had been employed since 2003 and received good evaluations from his supervisors, parents and students during his tenure, according to EEOC lawyers.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | June 15, 1994
The other day, a Senate committee was talking about universal health care and the need to assure that no one is discriminated against for reasons of age, sex, or any other reason. It is a fine concept but it made my blood run cold.That's because these decisions seem to wind up being made by federal bureaucrats. And they have a strange way of dispensing what they consider to be justice.An example is a case I wrote about recently, that of a restaurant operator named Hans Morsbach, who runs several restaurants in Chicago's Hyde Park area.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced Thursday it has sued Extended Stay Hotels for paying women less than men performing the same work at the company's facility in Lexington Park. According to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, Latoya Weaver was hired as a guest services representative at the Extended Stay America hotel in St. Mary's County at $8 an hour. When she resigned nearly five years later, she was earning $8.88 an hour. Weaver offered to rescind her resignation if she could get a raise, but the general manager told her that wasn't possible because the hotel was being renovated, according to the EEOC.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | May 20, 1991
The number of sexual harassment cases filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is on the rise, the federal agency reports, and it is taking steps to resolve them much faster.Sexual harassment is prohibited under Title 7 of the U.S. Civil Rights Act of 1964, enforced by the EEOC. The agency reports 5,600 complaints were made in 1990, up from 4,400 in 1986. The agency estimates it takes an average of 200 days to process a case.To expedite things, the EEOC has issued from Washington sample pleadings that do a lot of the research work for lawyers suing.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
The Social Security Administration is overhauling its internal anti-discrimination program after federal auditors found that the agency failed to establish an adequate system for handling employee claims. Auditors from the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission reported in May that the Woodlawn-based agency had failed to follow regulations on addressing workplace discrimination complaints, had manipulated data to boost case completion rates and might have allowed managers to interfere in what were supposed to be impartial investigations.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
As a long-time advocate for equal employment opportunity in the federal workplace, I applaud your recent article, "Report finds 'failure' in Social Security discrimination complaint process" (May 15) by John Fritze, which disclosed the recent audit of the Social Security Administration's employment discrimination complaints process conducted by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Now the EEOC needs to conduct audits of other federal agencies, including those in the legislative branch, because the shortcomings of the SSA's complaints process are not unique to that agency.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
The Social Security Administration has failed to establish an adequate process for handling discrimination claims from employees and has sparked concerns about conflicts of interest in some of those cases, according to a scathing federal report obtained Thursday by The Baltimore Sun. Auditors at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, charged with enforcing workplace discrimination laws, said the agency failed to follow regulations when handling...
BUSINESS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
An Annapolis medical practice will pay $22,500 to a former employee who claimed she was discriminated against because she was pregnant. Officials for Annapolis Internal Medicine said Tuesday they agreed to the payment to settle a lawsuit filed last year by the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission on behalf of the employee. Jonathan P. Kagan, an attorney for Annapolis Internal Medicine, said the doctors decided to settle rather than bear the expense of defending it at trial. The doctors deny any wrongdoing, he said.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 30, 2013
Harford County-based Upper Chesapeake Health System is the subject of a complaint and lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of a former employee who claims she was discriminated against because of a disability and retaliated against when she sought federal relief. The civil suit was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore and alleges the non-profit health care company "failed to provide a reasonable accommodation, fired, and later refused to rehire a pulmonary function technologist because of her disability and in retaliation for her requesting an accommodation and complaining about discrimination," according to a news release issued Friday by EEOC's Baltimore office.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced Thursday it has sued Extended Stay Hotels for paying women less than men performing the same work at the company's facility in Lexington Park. According to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, Latoya Weaver was hired as a guest services representative at the Extended Stay America hotel in St. Mary's County at $8 an hour. When she resigned nearly five years later, she was earning $8.88 an hour. Weaver offered to rescind her resignation if she could get a raise, but the general manager told her that wasn't possible because the hotel was being renovated, according to the EEOC.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A major national Hispanic organization issued a report yesterday indirectly but sharply criticizing Judge Clarence Thomas, President Bush's nominee for the Supreme Court.The report was the latest indication that Hispanic opposition to Judge Thomas' confirmation by the Senate is growing and becoming more severe.The Washington-based National Council of La Raza distributed here and at its annual convention in Houston a report describing as "extremely poor" and very nearly discriminatory the performance of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on behalf of Hispanics while Judge Thomas was the commission's chairman.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | October 1, 1993
The reader jogged my memory. "What ever happened to that small businessman who owned the lamp company? The one the government was crucifying for not hiring enough minorities?"He was talking about the nightmarish case of Mike Welbel, which I wrote about more than three years ago.And it embarrassed me to admit that I didn't know how the Welbel case had turned out -- whether the government had put him out of business or if he managed to survive.Some of you may remember that column. It was carried in hundreds of papers, reprinted in the Reader's Digest, and "60 Minutes" picked it up.But one of the sins of those of us in the news business is that we don't always go back and do a follow-up on how a story ends.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Toys "R" Us, alleging the company broke the law when staff at its Columbia store refused to provide a sign-language interpreter for a job applicant who is deaf. The lawsuit, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, says the retailer discriminated against the woman, Shakirra Thomas, after she applied for a position at the store in 2011. It alleges the company violated the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires employers to provide "reasonable accommodations" for job applicants and workers with disabilities.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Baltimore County has asked a judge to suspend proceedings in an age-discrimination case, saying in federal court filings that determining damages owed to employees and retirees could be a "lengthy, costly and complex" process that requires the review of 10,000 pension files. County officials think it could take at least two years to determine how much people are owed in the case, according to the court documents. U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg ruled last month that the county's pension system discriminates because older workers had to pay more toward their retirement than younger workers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.