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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 26, 2010
I would like to address a snarky letter from Mr. Robert L. Dunker Jr., of Catonsville. A Republican (and former Democrat), my dear Mr. Dunker expressed skepticism about the worthiness of a $4 million, taxpayer-funded project described in this space in late October, and he questioned my regard for facts. Instead of challenging him to a duel, I thought I'd just write a column in response. "I realize that as a columnist you have no obligation to check the facts," one of the many sentences in Mr. Dunker's letter began.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
- On a chilly morning when other watermen on the Patuxent River dredged for oysters, Jimmy Trossbach sought more slippery quarry - American eels. "I don't know what we'll find here," Trossbach said as he guided his 45-foot workboat, Prospector, to a pair of empty plastic jugs bobbing on the water. His helper, Jake Walker, hooked the makeshift buoy and reeled in the eel pots or traps they'd set in the river two days before. The first cylindrical mesh cage they hauled aboard pulsed with a writhing tangle of olive green.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
- On a chilly morning when other watermen on the Patuxent River dredged for oysters, Jimmy Trossbach sought more slippery quarry - American eels. "I don't know what we'll find here," Trossbach said as he guided his 45-foot workboat, Prospector, to a pair of empty plastic jugs bobbing on the water. His helper, Jake Walker, hooked the makeshift buoy and reeled in the eel pots or traps they'd set in the river two days before. The first cylindrical mesh cage they hauled aboard pulsed with a writhing tangle of olive green.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
The "Bizarre Foods America with Andrew Zimmern" episode featuring Baltimore will air on Monday, March 25 at 9 p.m. on the Travel Channel. Here is the episode synopsis from the Travel Channel: " There's a long line of tradition on the menu when Andrew Zimmern visits Baltimore and the Chesapeake Bay.  From learning how to skin a muskrat from a local champion, to hauling in pots of fresh eels, to selling produce from a horse-drawn carriage,...
NEWS
By Capt.Bob Spore | July 12, 1991
Department of Natural Resources officials, faced with a number of dead rockfish floating in the upper bay, are pushing through an emergency regulation to deal with the problem.The regulation would be aimed at anglers who use live eels for bait.Last year, after the rockfish season ended, the Striped Bass Advisory Board recommended the state prohibit eels as bait during non-rockfish seasons.Striped bass often take the eel deep into its gut before an angler knows he has a fish on his line. If the angler attempts to retrieve his hook, the result is often a dead rockfish.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
MILLINGTON -- As a sheet of greenish water slipped over a dam, Steve Minkkinen squatted on the wet rocks near the bottom, wielding a power drill and a plastic tube. He was building a water slide, but not for humans. It's for American eels - a slime-slicked, pop-eyed species that boasts one of the most remarkable life cycles in the animal kingdom. Because eel populations have been dwindling in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere, the federal government is considering endangered species protections, which would prohibit fishing for them.
NEWS
By Terry Kliewer and Terry Kliewer,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | March 14, 1999
MONAVILLE, Texas -- Out here on the fertile prairie west of Houston, the coming summer holds the promise of something beyond its usual bounty of tall corn, fat watermelons and sleek cattle.Signs are that 1999 will be a banner year for eels, too.You heard right, pardner: eels, those slimy, snaky fish chiefly known for lurking in coral reefs and providing skins for belts and wallets.It so happens that the freshwater variety, which do their lurking in rivers and ponds, are eminently edible and much in demand in certain markets.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1999
BISHOPVILLE -- Julie Weeder and Al Wesche are slopping around in a waist-high brackish soup of algae, water grasses and lily pads, collecting inch-long, spaghetti-thin creatures that look like tiny snakes.Pulling a simple, handmade wooden and screen trap from the water near the dam that hinders the flow of Bishopville Pond into the St. Martin River in rural Worcester County, the pair of marine biologists pour their slithering catch of baby American eels into a plastic bucket.After Wesche samples the water's temperature, salinity and oxygen level, the elvers are counted and released to continue a 2,000-mile journey that has taken them from the depths of the Sargasso Sea between Bermuda and Puerto Rico to the shallow, brownish-green waters of the state's coastal rivers and streams.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | October 8, 1991
Ah, suddenly those familiar names of yore come back; Man O'War Shoals, Spartys Lump, Gales Shoals, Teakettle Shoals, and the list goes on and on.They're upper Chesapeake Bay rockfish haunts of the good old days when in early fall the fish were plentiful, and the catching was good. Pretty much forgotten the past six years except for last fall's unexpectedly brief rock season, once again they will be in the limelight tomorrow -- and probably a month thereafter.Maryland's second post-moratorium fall rockfish season opens tomorrow amidst the concern of many that the catching of legal fish won't be as good as it was last fall when recreational anglers took their quota in 10 days, and charterboaters less than a week later.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | October 15, 1991
KENT ISLAND -- Talk of suspense.Sixteen eyes were riveted on the engine box of Joe Bernard's cabin cruiser as Michael Rossbach checked out the center of attraction. The hushed group watched him lay the rule alongside the object of attention.A loud cheer erupted. The rockfish taken on a Rat-L-Trap measured exactly 18 inches. It was a keeper, and our only legal one in a sunrise to past sunset odyssey that took us completely around Kent Island.In all we cast and trolled more than 65 miles in our junket down the Wye, Miles, Eastern Bay, up and down the Chesapeake and past Love Point, into the Chester, and homeward via Kent Narrows.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 26, 2010
I would like to address a snarky letter from Mr. Robert L. Dunker Jr., of Catonsville. A Republican (and former Democrat), my dear Mr. Dunker expressed skepticism about the worthiness of a $4 million, taxpayer-funded project described in this space in late October, and he questioned my regard for facts. Instead of challenging him to a duel, I thought I'd just write a column in response. "I realize that as a columnist you have no obligation to check the facts," one of the many sentences in Mr. Dunker's letter began.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 25, 2010
If Democrats and Republicans could work as well together as Anguilla rostrata and Elliptio complanata do, we'd probably have a better country. They don't have to like each other much — Anguilla and Elliptio aren't especially fond of each other, either — but if the leaders of the two major parties could at least strive toward the kind of symbiosis found in nature, we might see some progress on all sorts of issues confronting the nation....
SPORTS
October 17, 2010
James Prosek has spent much of his professional life writing about and painting pictures of glamour fish — the trout, the salmon — that are appealing to the eye and the palette. Born the same week and year I graduated from college (sigh), Prosek has 10 fishing books to his credit (double sigh). Galleries have had shows featuring his fish paintings and he won a Peabody — broadcasting's equivalent of the Pulitzer — for his ESPN documentary on Izaak Walton, the 17th-century author and trout angler.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | August 2, 2006
MILLINGTON -- As a sheet of greenish water slipped over a dam, Steve Minkkinen squatted on the wet rocks near the bottom, wielding a power drill and a plastic tube. He was building a water slide, but not for humans. It's for American eels - a slime-slicked, pop-eyed species that boasts one of the most remarkable life cycles in the animal kingdom. Because eel populations have been dwindling in the Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere, the federal government is considering endangered species protections, which would prohibit fishing for them.
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
BENEDICT -- Irving Chappelear hauled a basket teeming with green eels and oozing slime out of the Patuxent River and onto the dock in this small town in Southern Maryland. As the writhing, snakelike bodies twisted against each other, the suction made a soft squeaking noise that sounded like faint cries. The song of the American eel has been fading for Chappelear and other watermen since the 1970s. Eel populations have dwindled as their rivers have been blocked by dams and muddied by pollution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
In a way, the Gonzalez family is a microcosm of today's multisided music scene. Papa Dennis is a prolific jazz trumpeter and teacher who has toured internationally for about 25 years. Sons Aaron and Stefan are Akkolyte, a grindcore punk duo on the do-it-yourself circuit, which plays the Barclay House on Sunday. Together, they form Yells at Eels, an improv-based experimental trio from Dallas that plays An Die Musik on Saturday. Yells at Eels is an example of how radically different genres - free jazz and grindcore punk - can fuse and create a new sound.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton and Bill Burton,Evening Sun Staff | April 3, 1991
The Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermens Association won the first round in its fight to have striped bass declared a gamefish, but there might not be enough time left to win the battle.By a 6-4 vote the State Senate Economic and Environmental Matters Committee approved Senate Bill 575, which could go to a full Senate vote today. However, with the General Assembly due to adjourn Monday, MSSA executive director Rich Novotny said it will be a "tough struggle" to get the legislation through the House of Delegates before time runs out.In addition, if approved in the Senate, the bill could go to the House Environmental Matters Committee, which a couple weeks ago turned down a companion bill to prohibit gillnetting of rockfish in Maryland by a vote of 14 to 4. SB 575 would prohibit the sale and commercial fishing of all types for rock while providing a fund to buy out watermen, and also offer other incentives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
In a way, the Gonzalez family is a microcosm of today's multisided music scene. Papa Dennis is a prolific jazz trumpeter and teacher who has toured internationally for about 25 years. Sons Aaron and Stefan are Akkolyte, a grindcore punk duo on the do-it-yourself circuit, which plays the Barclay House on Sunday. Together, they form Yells at Eels, an improv-based experimental trio from Dallas that plays An Die Musik on Saturday. Yells at Eels is an example of how radically different genres - free jazz and grindcore punk - can fuse and create a new sound.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
MECHANICSVILLE - Bundled up against a cold wind blowing across the Patuxent River, biologist Willem Roosenburg scoops up a fat croaker from a net intended to catch terrapins. "Where are the turtles? Tell me where they are," Roosenburg croons light-heartedly, holding the fish's lips up to his ear. The answer is a loud, unhelpful grunt, and Roosenburg tosses the fish back into the water. On this unseasonably chilly May morning, the diamondback terrapins he seeks lie out of sight on the muddy bottom of Persimmon Creek, lulled into listlessness by water temperatures hovering around the 60-degree mark.
NEWS
By Charlie LeDuff and Charlie LeDuff,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2000
NEW YORK -- Larry Seaman has called the lawyers, but he doesn't know how he can pay them. You don't make much as an eel fisherman: about a dollar a pound. Seaman, the patriarch of the last New York City eeling family, said he was given an oral promise 30 years ago by the federal authorities. They would include the waters of Jamaica Bay in the Gateway National Recreation Area, and he would have lifetime rights to trap eels commercially there. But recently U.S. Park Police boarded his rig and warned him that he would be fined $500 and his equipment confiscated if they caught him fishing in federal waters again.
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