Advertisement
HomeCollectionsEe Bonds
IN THE NEWS

Ee Bonds

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | January 21, 2001
I'm the holder of some Series E and Series EE savings bonds, and I'd like to confirm some information with you ... concerning the interest-earning periods on E and EE bonds. I have received some conflicting information. This issue pops up all the time. And I'll bet part of the reason is that bonds can be confusing: There are different rules for different types of bonds. Fortunately, the answer to your question is fairly straightforward. Here it is, updated for the new year. And it includes some points from Daniel J. Pederson, author of "Savings Bonds: When to Hold, When to Fold, and Everything In-Between" (Sage Creek Press; 276 pages; $19.95)
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
The move by the federal government to end the sale of paper savings bonds at banks and credit unions next year is bad news for savers in more ways than one. The amount of savings bonds consumers can buy each year will be significantly reduced. And even though people can still purchase bonds online, the government's website is not easy to use. It's so difficult, in fact, that the nonprofit Maryland CASH Campaign has created a video of consumers struggling to navigate it. The Treasury Department's ultimate goal is to save millions by having consumers buy all savings bonds online through TreasuryDirect.gov.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
Savings bonds will never generate the big returns that are possible with stocks. But thanks to some new rules enacted last year, savings bonds may be a bit more alluring to super-conservative investors who want to shield some of their money from the gyrations that stocks sometimes experience.With the changes, the government is "trying to pump some excitement" back into savings bonds, said Daniel J. Pederson, head of Savings Bond Informer Inc., a Detroit-based investment advisory firm."The changes are good as far as they go," said Pederson, who has published a book, "U.S.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | October 1, 2006
Love 'em and leave 'em. That's the attitude of American investors holding $14.5 billion in U.S. savings bonds that have stopped accruing interest because the bonds are more than 30 years old. Those who purchased Series EE bonds now wouldn't touch them with a 10-foot pole. Stagnant savings bonds symbolize one of several mistakes that experts say investors commonly make with this instrument. Mistake No. 1: Owners allow expired savings bonds to collect dust because they don't want to incur the tax liability involved in cashing them in. "I call these `stinker' savings bonds because if they're not earning interest, they are a terrible investment," said Tom Adams, who runs Savings-bond-advisor.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN | April 3, 1995
NEW YORK -- The U.S. Treasury just announced a new interest-rate structure for Series EE savings bonds. The new yields will be better for buyers who will hold their bonds less than five years. For longer-term holders, it all depends. You could earn a bit less than the older bonds paid, depending on how interest rates do.The change takes effect May 1. Starting then, the rates on all newly issued EE bonds will be linked to market rates. EE bonds held for less than five years will earn 85 percent of the average six-month Treasury bill yield.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | September 5, 1999
Is there a limit to how many I bonds, an amount, I can buy in one year? Also, if there is, can I buy so much in my name and [so much in] my husband's so that I could buy more per year? Also, another question: Are there any other things besides the face value and the automatically-keeping-up-with-inflation that are different from the EE bonds?J.D., North Kingstown, R.I.The new inflation-proof U.S. Savings Bonds are known as Series I bonds. The most you may invest in them is $30,000 a year, says Daniel J. Pederson, president of the Savings Bond Informer of Detroit (800-927-1901)
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | July 27, 1998
STARTING Sept. 1, you'll be offered a new type of U.S. savings bond.It's an inflation-linked investment, dubbed a "Series I" bond. These bonds will protect your purchasing power in any economic environment. They'll pay a fixed return on top of inflation, no matter how high inflation goes.The fixed return will probably run between 3 percent and 3.5 percent and will be added to the average inflation rate to determine your current yield. Say, for example, that an I bond's fixed, annual yield is 3.25 percent and inflation is 1.5 percent.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | October 1, 2006
Love 'em and leave 'em. That's the attitude of American investors holding $14.5 billion in U.S. savings bonds that have stopped accruing interest because the bonds are more than 30 years old. Those who purchased Series EE bonds now wouldn't touch them with a 10-foot pole. Stagnant savings bonds symbolize one of several mistakes that experts say investors commonly make with this instrument. Mistake No. 1: Owners allow expired savings bonds to collect dust because they don't want to incur the tax liability involved in cashing them in. "I call these `stinker' savings bonds because if they're not earning interest, they are a terrible investment," said Tom Adams, who runs Savings-bond-advisor.
BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn | September 30, 1996
IF YOU'RE holding some Series EE Savings Bonds that still pay a guaranteed 7.5 percent interest, tell them hail and farewell. The last of those excellent bonds reach maturity next month. Their new guaranteed rate is dropping to 4 percent.All bonds more than 40 years old have stopped earning interest entirely. All bonds issued after November 1965 stop earning interest 30 years from the issue date. Those bought in 1966 are gradually running out this year.So check for old bonds in your safe-deposit box or among the papers of elderly relatives.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | September 26, 1999
I'm interested in knowing when it is best to cash in savings bonds. I know if a bond is issued in January, then the best day to cash it in would be January or July. Well, is it the first day of that month, or do you need to wait for the issue date?-- P. M., Hope, R.I."The rule of thumb is, if you're going to cash in a bond, cash it in early in the month. If you're going to buy a bond, buy it later in the month," said Daniel J. Pederson, president of the Savings Bond Informer, a Detroit company that calculates bond values and sells other services to bondholders.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 1, 2004
TIME IS RUNNING out for HH savings bonds and investors who may want them. At the end of this month, the federal government will stop issuing new HH bonds, which were introduced 24 years ago. The HH bond was never as popular as its siblings - Series EE and I bonds - which was part of the problem. Investors have more than $205 billion tied up in all types of savings bonds, but only $14.2 billion of that, or about 7 percent, is held in HH bonds. With low demand for HH bonds, the Treasury Department concluded they weren't worth the administrative expense.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 24, 2002
There's good news and bad news for people who like to buy U.S. savings bonds. The good news is that the government increased the interest rate for the Series I bond, a type intended to offer bondholders some protection from inflation. As a result, if you buy a Series I bond now through April, it'll earn interest at an annualized rate of 4.08 percent. That's up from 2.57 percent for I bonds purchased from May through October. "In a tight, conservative, low-interest-rate environment, that's a pretty big jump," said Daniel J. Pederson, president of BondHelp.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | June 2, 2002
I have a lot of Series E bonds coming due. Could you please tell me if I can transfer them, as I don't want to cash them in right now. Yes, said John J. Foley, spokesman for the Bureau of the Public Debt, which runs the nation's savings bond program. You can exchange or swap your Series E and/or Series EE bonds for Series HH bonds. In effect, you can "roll over" or "convert" these bonds to Series HH bonds. As a result, you'll postpone - for up to 20 years - the federal income tax that would usually be due on the bonds you exchange, Foley said.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | January 21, 2001
I'm the holder of some Series E and Series EE savings bonds, and I'd like to confirm some information with you ... concerning the interest-earning periods on E and EE bonds. I have received some conflicting information. This issue pops up all the time. And I'll bet part of the reason is that bonds can be confusing: There are different rules for different types of bonds. Fortunately, the answer to your question is fairly straightforward. Here it is, updated for the new year. And it includes some points from Daniel J. Pederson, author of "Savings Bonds: When to Hold, When to Fold, and Everything In-Between" (Sage Creek Press; 276 pages; $19.95)
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | October 22, 2000
A 25-cent piece with a drummer on it: I would like to know how much it's worth today. ... I went to three coin dealers and they told me that it's not worth more than 25 cents. It says on there 1776 to 1976. The coin dealers are probably right. "Just because something's old doesn't necessarily mean it's worth something," said Stephen L. Bobbitt, spokesman for the American Numismatic Association, a nonprofit group for collectors of coins and paper money. "Granted, those quarters aren't that easy to come by," Bobbitt said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2000
Savings bonds these days don't generate the same excitement of, say, Internet stocks, but the new inflation-proof bonds are attracting more attention. Introduced in September 1998, the inflation-indexed savings bonds, or Series I Bonds, guarantee a rate of return above inflation. New I bonds are paying a rate of 6.98 percent, better than most money market accounts and certificates of deposit. "It's a good return for a government security," said Tony Ristaino, a certified financial planner in Towson.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1990
U.S. savings bonds have long been a popular way to save money, particularly because many employers allow them to be purchased through payroll deductions.Use of savings bonds as a way to pay for college education has also been encouraged by a law that allows eligible bondholders to exempt the interest of recent Series EE bonds from federal taxes.As a service to readers, The Evening Sun at year-end publishes the redemption value of all U.S. savings notes and bonds.Savings notes, also known as "Freedom Shares," were issued during a four-year period starting in the Johnson administration.
FEATURES
By SUSAN BONDY and SUSAN BONDY,Creators Syndicate | October 23, 1994
Q: In September 1986, when I heard that the U.S. Treasury Department was going to lower the then-minimum floor of 7.5 percent, I bought $20,000 of Series EE savings bonds. A month later, the minimum rate went down to 6 percent. My question is this: Now that the bonds will be maturing, if I continue to hold them past maturity, will the old 7.5 percent floor still apply?A: You sure made a smart move back in '86. To answer your question, that 7.5 percent minimum interest is in effect during the first 10 years and in your case will continue until September 1996.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,THE PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | September 26, 1999
I'm interested in knowing when it is best to cash in savings bonds. I know if a bond is issued in January, then the best day to cash it in would be January or July. Well, is it the first day of that month, or do you need to wait for the issue date?-- P. M., Hope, R.I."The rule of thumb is, if you're going to cash in a bond, cash it in early in the month. If you're going to buy a bond, buy it later in the month," said Daniel J. Pederson, president of the Savings Bond Informer, a Detroit company that calculates bond values and sells other services to bondholders.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | September 5, 1999
Is there a limit to how many I bonds, an amount, I can buy in one year? Also, if there is, can I buy so much in my name and [so much in] my husband's so that I could buy more per year? Also, another question: Are there any other things besides the face value and the automatically-keeping-up-with-inflation that are different from the EE bonds?J.D., North Kingstown, R.I.The new inflation-proof U.S. Savings Bonds are known as Series I bonds. The most you may invest in them is $30,000 a year, says Daniel J. Pederson, president of the Savings Bond Informer of Detroit (800-927-1901)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.