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Edwin Edwards

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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | October 21, 1991
NEW ORLEANS -- After voters put two of Louisiana's most controversial politicians since Huey Long into a Nov. 16 runoff for governor, Louisianians were left asking themselves: How did it happen?How did they end up with a choice for governor between David Duke and Edwin Edwards?"What a disaster!" said Raul Bencomo, a lawyer in New Orleans. "The only thing that would be worse is if Duke wins."Political analysts don't think that will happen. But, as Duke was only too eager to point out yesterday, the political establishment has consistently underestimated his appeal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
You have to be from Louisiana and live there to write a meaningful book about that state. Yet few Louisianians can afford to reveal what they know. Only insiders have the story; only outsiders are willing to tell it. The exceptions include A. J. Liebling, who in 1970 wrote a devastating book called The Earl Of Louisiana (Louisiana State University Press, 252 pages, $14.95) about Gov. Earl K. Long. Uncle Earl, smarter than his brother Huey, was a master of politics practiced the Louisiana way. "Those who are with me in the first primary get the jobs," Uncle Earl liked to say, referring to the Louisiana system -- primary, then runoff -- where elections happen twice.
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NEWS
October 24, 1991
Republicans have consistently under-estimated David Duke. Now that he is the Republican nominee for governor of Louisiana, they've got to do something about him. He is not just your garden variety Southern conservative. He is a former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard and founder of the Nazi-sympathizing National Association for the Advancement of White People. Unless President Bush, Vice President Quayle and others come to the aid of the Democratic nominee, former Gov. Edwin Edwards, Governor Duke may show up at the Republican National Convention next year with all necessary credentials.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 2000
NEW ORLEANS -- "Fast Eddie" has always been a fitting nickname for Edwin Edwards. The smooth-talking, lady-killing, four-term former governor of Louisiana, has walked -- no, strutted -- out of two federal racketeering trials a free man. Tomorrow in a federal court in Baton Rouge, he will go on trial again, this time with his son Stephen and four co-defendants. They are charged with extorting money from the state's casinos and tampering with the licensing process. Edwards faces 28 counts.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 2000
NEW ORLEANS -- "Fast Eddie" has always been a fitting nickname for Edwin Edwards. The smooth-talking, lady-killing, four-term former governor of Louisiana, has walked -- no, strutted -- out of two federal racketeering trials a free man. Tomorrow in a federal court in Baton Rouge, he will go on trial again, this time with his son Stephen and four co-defendants. They are charged with extorting money from the state's casinos and tampering with the licensing process. Edwards faces 28 counts.
NEWS
November 20, 1991
Edwin Edwards defeated David Duke by the lopsided margin of 61-39 percent. This should have made all liberals, moderates and true conservatives very happy. Yet many voices from among those groups are expressing concern about the Louisiana gubernatorial voting. They say the Duke vote indicates racism is strong and rising in Louisiana, in the South and probably even in the nation.That is not true. Worry warts should savor the reality of a smashing victory. Sixty-one percent of the vote in any two-candidate race has always been and is still considered a huge landslide.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 19, 1991
DAVID Duke's defeat in the Louisiana governor's race brings both a sense of relief and fresh alarm about where American politics seems to be headed.Relief, because electing a former Nazi and Ku Klux Klansman governor would have been an appalling endorsement of bigotry. Alarm, because Duke's rapid rise in politics makes clear that racism has a large constituency.Nearly 40 percent of voters in Duke's state thought him suitable to serve. Tens of thousands from around the nation rallied to his support or contributed to his campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
You have to be from Louisiana and live there to write a meaningful book about that state. Yet few Louisianians can afford to reveal what they know. Only insiders have the story; only outsiders are willing to tell it. The exceptions include A. J. Liebling, who in 1970 wrote a devastating book called The Earl Of Louisiana (Louisiana State University Press, 252 pages, $14.95) about Gov. Earl K. Long. Uncle Earl, smarter than his brother Huey, was a master of politics practiced the Louisiana way. "Those who are with me in the first primary get the jobs," Uncle Earl liked to say, referring to the Louisiana system -- primary, then runoff -- where elections happen twice.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover and Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover,Jonathan Massie -- Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1991
NEW ORLEANS -- One of the most bizarre campaigns in American political history comes to a close here today awash in rancorous rhetoric. Most indicators pointed to a victory by former Gov. Edwin W. Edwards, the colorful political rogue seeking political redemption at 64.But there was still some nervous uncertainty in the bipartisan de facto coalition that has formed to defeat David Duke, the one-time Ku Klux Klan leader who claimed a place on the national political...
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Setting the stage for one of hottest, most racially charged campaigns in years, former Gov. Edwin W. Edwards will meet former Klansman David Duke next month in a runoff election for governor of Louisiana.Mr. Duke, a freshman member of the Louisiana Legislature, enters the four-week campaign as the underdog, but at least one analyst gives him a "50-50" chance of winning the election Nov. 16.The showdown between Republican Duke and Democrat Edwards was the surprise outcome of Saturday's Louisiana primary, which dealt a double-barreled setback to the national Republican Party.
NEWS
November 20, 1991
Edwin Edwards defeated David Duke by the lopsided margin of 61-39 percent. This should have made all liberals, moderates and true conservatives very happy. Yet many voices from among those groups are expressing concern about the Louisiana gubernatorial voting. They say the Duke vote indicates racism is strong and rising in Louisiana, in the South and probably even in the nation.That is not true. Worry warts should savor the reality of a smashing victory. Sixty-one percent of the vote in any two-candidate race has always been and is still considered a huge landslide.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 19, 1991
DAVID Duke's defeat in the Louisiana governor's race brings both a sense of relief and fresh alarm about where American politics seems to be headed.Relief, because electing a former Nazi and Ku Klux Klansman governor would have been an appalling endorsement of bigotry. Alarm, because Duke's rapid rise in politics makes clear that racism has a large constituency.Nearly 40 percent of voters in Duke's state thought him suitable to serve. Tens of thousands from around the nation rallied to his support or contributed to his campaign.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover and Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover,Jonathan Massie -- Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1991
NEW ORLEANS -- One of the most bizarre campaigns in American political history comes to a close here today awash in rancorous rhetoric. Most indicators pointed to a victory by former Gov. Edwin W. Edwards, the colorful political rogue seeking political redemption at 64.But there was still some nervous uncertainty in the bipartisan de facto coalition that has formed to defeat David Duke, the one-time Ku Klux Klan leader who claimed a place on the national political...
NEWS
October 24, 1991
Republicans have consistently under-estimated David Duke. Now that he is the Republican nominee for governor of Louisiana, they've got to do something about him. He is not just your garden variety Southern conservative. He is a former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard and founder of the Nazi-sympathizing National Association for the Advancement of White People. Unless President Bush, Vice President Quayle and others come to the aid of the Democratic nominee, former Gov. Edwin Edwards, Governor Duke may show up at the Republican National Convention next year with all necessary credentials.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | October 21, 1991
NEW ORLEANS -- After voters put two of Louisiana's most controversial politicians since Huey Long into a Nov. 16 runoff for governor, Louisianians were left asking themselves: How did it happen?How did they end up with a choice for governor between David Duke and Edwin Edwards?"What a disaster!" said Raul Bencomo, a lawyer in New Orleans. "The only thing that would be worse is if Duke wins."Political analysts don't think that will happen. But, as Duke was only too eager to point out yesterday, the political establishment has consistently underestimated his appeal.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,New York Times News ServiceSun Staff Correspondent | November 18, 1991
NEW ORLEANS -- For the first day in a month, Louisianans could breathe easily yesterday. David Duke would not be their next governor after all.But behind the lopsided returns in Saturday's election lay a sobering fact: A majority of the state's white voters -- about 55 percent -- had cast their ballots for the former Klansman and neo-Nazi.Despite an unprecedented and wildly successful negative ad campaign aimed at stopping him, Mr. Duke got 75,000 more votes than he received in his U.S. Senate bid last year.
NEWS
December 13, 1990
Peter Goelden, 48, who ran for governor of Louisiana in 1987 as an independent, apparently hanged himself Tuesday at a Shreveport carpet store, where he was a salesman, police said. No suicide note was found at the store, police said. Mr. Goelden was among seven people who ran against Democrat Edwin Edwards in the 1987 election won by Democrat Gov. Charles E. "Buddy" Roemer III.
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