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Edwin Booth

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October 6, 1991
The Edwin Booth Theater will present the musical "Annie" at 2 p.m. today at Harford Day School, Moores Mill Road, in Bel Air.Additional performances are scheduled for Oct. 11 through 13 and Oct. 18 through 20.Friday and Saturday performances are scheduled to begin at 8 p.m., while Sunday matinees start at 2 p.m.The show is directed by Allan Herlinger.Tickets are $9 for adults and $7 for students and senior citizens. Group rates also are available.Information: 836-9200.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
Dinah K. Faber, a writer, photographer and historian who was known as "the Booth Lady" for her preservation work on Tudor Hall, the Harford County home of the famous Booth family, died Sunday of colon cancer at her Colby, Kan., home. She was 62. The daughter of farmers, Dinah K. Faber was born and raised in Colby and graduated in 1967 from Brewster High School. She earned a degree in anthropology from Kansas State University and a master's degree in English in 1980 from the University of Arkansas.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | November 12, 2006
More than 20 years ago, Gary Sloan strolled down the long lane leading to Tudor Hall. He walked up to the porch where the owner sat in a rocking chair. "I just had to see it," Sloan said of the Bel Air residence, dubbed "Shakespeare's birthplace in America" because it was formerly home to two famous Shakespearean actors -- Junius Booth and his son Edwin -- in addition to the man who shot President Abraham Lincoln -- Edwin's brother, John Wilkes Booth. For Sloan, the visit was significant because he idolized Edwin Booth, considered one of the greatest American actors of the 19th century.
NEWS
February 10, 2008
The artist William H. Calfee was born in Washington on Feb. 7, 1909. In 1938, he painted the mural entitled First Performance of Edwin Booth. The painting was commissioned by the Department of the Treasury Section of Painting and Sculpture to be hung in the Bel Air Post Office. It depicts a performance given by Booth in August 1851 at the Bel Air Courthouse, although it was not the actor's first performance. Such murals were designed to "restore confidence in a people suffering from the effects of the Depression by depicting images of events or scenes of local significance."
NEWS
By Herbert Mitgang and Herbert Mitgang,New York Times News Service HC | April 26, 1992
In December 1860, more than four years before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln in Ford's Theater in Washington, the actor wrote a 21-page manuscript that showed his fanatical state of mind, his sympathies for the Southern secessionists, and his association with the historical characters he portrayed in Shakespeare's plays.In the view of Lincoln scholars, had these sentiments been known to the officials responsible for guarding the president, it is possible that Booth would not have had such easy access to the theater on April 14, 1865.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
1891: Edwin Booth's last performance On April 4, 1891, after nearly 42 years onstage, Edwin Thomas Booth, one of the best-loved American Shakespearean actors of the last half of the 19th century, gave his final performance. Afterward, there were so many waving admirers outside of the Brooklyn Academy of Music that police had to clear a way for Booth's carriage. Edwin Booth, famed for the role of Hamlet, was born Nov. 13, 1833, in a log farmhouse near Bel Air, where in 1822 Edwin's father, English actor Junius Brutus Booth, had established a summer home.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
The nation was gripped in deep mourning when President Abraham Lincoln died April 15, 1863, hours after he was shot during a performance of Our American Cousin at Washington's Ford's Theatre. Eleven days would pass before his assassin, actor John Wilkes Booth, a Harford County native, would be found hiding in a barn in Bowling Green, Va. After Booth shot Lincoln, he made his way to Anacostia, Va., where he was met by David Herold, a young accomplice, and the pair made their way through Southern Maryland to Port Tobacco.
NEWS
By Charlotte Sommers and Charlotte Sommers,Special to The Sun | October 16, 1994
The moon was shrouded in mist as a stream of cars wound around the drive to Tudor Manor, birthplace of the infamous John Wilkes Booth. The revolving red and blue lights of a police car cast an eerie glow on a dilapidated shed where yellow banners warned: "Crime scene -- do not cross." Inside, a trail of blood led to a corpse."Murder at the Auction," the annual murder mystery production of the Edwin Booth Theater, had begun. In the audience participation play by Paul Trimbur, the action takes place in and around historic Tudor Manor in rural Harford County, just outside Bel Air.A woman has been murdered the evening her priceless antiques are to be auctioned.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
Dinah K. Faber, a writer, photographer and historian who was known as "the Booth Lady" for her preservation work on Tudor Hall, the Harford County home of the famous Booth family, died Sunday of colon cancer at her Colby, Kan., home. She was 62. The daughter of farmers, Dinah K. Faber was born and raised in Colby and graduated in 1967 from Brewster High School. She earned a degree in anthropology from Kansas State University and a master's degree in English in 1980 from the University of Arkansas.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | October 21, 1996
"THIS IS MY ONE chance of immortality,'' said the aging but still legendary Sarah Bernhardt when she agreed in 1912 to make a silent movie of her play, ''Queen Elizabeth.'' Aged 68, hobbled by a wooden leg, Bernhardt believed that capturing her performance on film would ensure her legacy for posterity.Bernhardt's example persuaded the then renowned but now largely forgotten Shakespearean actor, Frederick Warde, to go before the cameras that same year in ''Richard III.'' With the recent, astonishing discovery of a nearly perfect print of this long-lost movie -- the oldest surviving American four-reel feature film -- modern audiences will glimpse the dramatic skills of a man who honed his craft with some of the finest performers of the 19th century, including the great tragedian Edwin Booth, with whom Warde first performed at Baltimore's fabled Ford's Theatre 120 years ago.Warde was born in England in 1851 and made his stage debut in ''Macbeth'' at the age of 16. He became a young friend and protege of Henry Irving, whose subsequent achievement on the stage earned him the first knighthood ever bestowed on an actor and burial in Westminster Abbey.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | November 12, 2006
More than 20 years ago, Gary Sloan strolled down the long lane leading to Tudor Hall. He walked up to the porch where the owner sat in a rocking chair. "I just had to see it," Sloan said of the Bel Air residence, dubbed "Shakespeare's birthplace in America" because it was formerly home to two famous Shakespearean actors -- Junius Booth and his son Edwin -- in addition to the man who shot President Abraham Lincoln -- Edwin's brother, John Wilkes Booth. For Sloan, the visit was significant because he idolized Edwin Booth, considered one of the greatest American actors of the 19th century.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2005
As a teenager, Michael Kauffman voraciously read books about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, becoming a budding authority on the topic at an early age. As new books came out, however, Kauffman was dismayed by the paucity of fresh information, particularly on John Wilkes Booth. A central question that became the focus of Kauffman's intense curiosity - why Booth plotted to kill Lincoln - went perpetually unanswered. Thus Kauffman embarked on an investigation that would span 30 years and require countless hours at the National Archives, interviews of relatives of the accused, weekly visits to the Booth family's Harford County home, and the retracing of Booth's steps before and after the crime.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
The nation was gripped in deep mourning when President Abraham Lincoln died April 15, 1863, hours after he was shot during a performance of Our American Cousin at Washington's Ford's Theatre. Eleven days would pass before his assassin, actor John Wilkes Booth, a Harford County native, would be found hiding in a barn in Bowling Green, Va. After Booth shot Lincoln, he made his way to Anacostia, Va., where he was met by David Herold, a young accomplice, and the pair made their way through Southern Maryland to Port Tobacco.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | October 21, 1996
"THIS IS MY ONE chance of immortality,'' said the aging but still legendary Sarah Bernhardt when she agreed in 1912 to make a silent movie of her play, ''Queen Elizabeth.'' Aged 68, hobbled by a wooden leg, Bernhardt believed that capturing her performance on film would ensure her legacy for posterity.Bernhardt's example persuaded the then renowned but now largely forgotten Shakespearean actor, Frederick Warde, to go before the cameras that same year in ''Richard III.'' With the recent, astonishing discovery of a nearly perfect print of this long-lost movie -- the oldest surviving American four-reel feature film -- modern audiences will glimpse the dramatic skills of a man who honed his craft with some of the finest performers of the 19th century, including the great tragedian Edwin Booth, with whom Warde first performed at Baltimore's fabled Ford's Theatre 120 years ago.Warde was born in England in 1851 and made his stage debut in ''Macbeth'' at the age of 16. He became a young friend and protege of Henry Irving, whose subsequent achievement on the stage earned him the first knighthood ever bestowed on an actor and burial in Westminster Abbey.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
Actor Gary Sloan can think of only three families who qualify as acting dynasties: the Booths, the Barrymores and the Redgraves.So he suggests it's more than merely notable that Lynn Redgrave is coming to Maryland this weekend to support efforts to restore Tudor Hall, the Harford County home of Junius Brutus Booth, patriarch of classical acting in America.Was it, perhaps, pre-ordained?After all, when Ms. Redgrave stepped inside the front door of Tudor Hall for the first time in April, she said, "I'm home," Dorothy Fox says.
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