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October 6, 1991
Armed with sharply defined design ideas and a legacy of antiques from one of Maryland's most distinguished families, Benjamin Preston Rich transformed a pedestrian town house, circa 1969, into an Edwardian showplace -- in only 30 days.For Mr. Rich, a sense of kinship with the past comes naturally. His forebears include Maryland's first governor, in the 18th century, Thomas Johnson; 19th century governor Elihu Jackson; and early 20th century governor Edwin Warfield, as well as Mr. Rich's maternal grandfather, Baltimore Mayor James H. Preston.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: RANNYGAZOO Either you are charmed by P.G.Wodehouse's parallel universe of Edwardian flippancy or you are not, and if you are not, this is the place to step off. Rannygazoo , (pronounced ran-ee-ga-ZOO) it turns out, is not a piece of Edwardian slang, but a solid Americanism from the late nineteenth century that Wodehouse gleefully lifted, as Michael Quinion explored at World Wide Words . It means, Mr. Quinion explains, "a deceptive story or scheme, pranks, tricks or other irritating or foolish carryings-on," the last sense being utterly Wodehousian.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: RANNYGAZOO Either you are charmed by P.G.Wodehouse's parallel universe of Edwardian flippancy or you are not, and if you are not, this is the place to step off. Rannygazoo , (pronounced ran-ee-ga-ZOO) it turns out, is not a piece of Edwardian slang, but a solid Americanism from the late nineteenth century that Wodehouse gleefully lifted, as Michael Quinion explored at World Wide Words . It means, Mr. Quinion explains, "a deceptive story or scheme, pranks, tricks or other irritating or foolish carryings-on," the last sense being utterly Wodehousian.
NEWS
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Chicago Tribune | October 29, 2006
Thunderstruck Erik Larson Crown / 463 pages / $25.95 Of all the nonfiction writers working today, Erik Larson seems to have the most delicious fun. For Isaac's Storm, his book about the deadly hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas, in 1900, he melded eyewitness reminiscences with the nascent science of weather to generate a dramatic narrative about devastating collisions. For The Devil in the White City, his best-selling National Book Award finalist, he coupled the realization of the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago with the gruesome, behind-the-scenes tale of a serial murderer.
NEWS
By Beth Kephart and Beth Kephart,Chicago Tribune | October 29, 2006
Thunderstruck Erik Larson Crown / 463 pages / $25.95 Of all the nonfiction writers working today, Erik Larson seems to have the most delicious fun. For Isaac's Storm, his book about the deadly hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas, in 1900, he melded eyewitness reminiscences with the nascent science of weather to generate a dramatic narrative about devastating collisions. For The Devil in the White City, his best-selling National Book Award finalist, he coupled the realization of the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago with the gruesome, behind-the-scenes tale of a serial murderer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothy Fleetwood | November 16, 1995
Edwardian ChristmasHoliday preparations are under way in many of the great mansions around the region, and one of the first to open forChristmas tours is Oatlands Plantation in Leesburg, Va."Christmas at Oatlands" begins Saturday and continues through Dec. 30. Visitors will step into a holiday party setting of the Edwardian era. The year is 1903 and electricity now lightens the world, or at least the homes of the affluent. Each of the mansion's 15 rooms is ablaze with light. White Christmas trees were also very much in fashion in 1903, and in the drawing room stands a 12-foot Christmas tree decorated in cotton snow, silver pine cones and white icicles.
FEATURES
By Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | August 22, 1993
Q: How valuable is our 15-inch-high Charlie McCarthy doll by EFFanBEE, which my wife received as a gift 55 years ago? The doll's in only fair condition: There's a chip near its chin, its white suit has yellowed, and its monocle has disappeared.A: If your doll were in mint condition, complete with its original box and name tag, it would be worth around $800, says antique-doll dealer Richard Wright, P.O. Box 227, Birchrunville, Pa. 19421, (215) 827-7442. In its present condition, its value falls to about $200.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | May 17, 2009
"Friday is Freeday" at Radisson Hotels What's the deal?: Friday night stays are free at participating Radisson Hotels when guests stay an additional night - either Thursday or Saturday night - for a minimum of two consecutive nights. So it's basically "buy one, get one." The deal is available at Radisson hotels and resorts properties in North, Central and South America; Asia Pacific; and at Radisson Edwardian Hotels in the United Kingdom. The offer is good for stays through Sept. 15. What's the savings?
FEATURES
By Lynn Williams | December 16, 1990
There have been eight kings of England named Edward, but only one gets his name applied to his very own Age.It's not that Edward VII was the best of the rulers that shared his name. Other Edwards made their way into Shakespearean plays, lived through plagues and the Hundred Years War and got bumped off in creative ways by ambitious usurpers. (And one, we mustn't forget, married a lady from Baltimore.) Our Edward, however, reigned briefly and well from 1901 to 1910, and is remembered mostly for his mistresses and for the glittering society over which he presided.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | August 31, 1997
We live in a townhouse that has an uninspired -- and uninspiring -- entrance hall. It's really just a long corridor with a door at the end that leads to a home office. There's also a staircase on one side of the entrance hall. How can this space be made more welcoming to guests?As it happens, I recently designed or, I should say, camouflaged an entrance hall a lot like yours. It was an uninteresting corridor-like space in a townhouse on the Baltimore harbor. With the help of various artisans -- and because the homeowners are adventurous souls -- the hall was transformed into a veritable Edwardian stage set.Cabinetmakers were brought in to install cherry wood paneling and embellished moldings.
FEATURES
October 6, 1991
Armed with sharply defined design ideas and a legacy of antiques from one of Maryland's most distinguished families, Benjamin Preston Rich transformed a pedestrian town house, circa 1969, into an Edwardian showplace -- in only 30 days.For Mr. Rich, a sense of kinship with the past comes naturally. His forebears include Maryland's first governor, in the 18th century, Thomas Johnson; 19th century governor Elihu Jackson; and early 20th century governor Edwin Warfield, as well as Mr. Rich's maternal grandfather, Baltimore Mayor James H. Preston.
NEWS
April 25, 1996
P. L. Travers,96, the woman who created the much-loved fictional character Mary Poppins, died at her London home Tuesday, friends said yesterday."Mary Poppins," published in 1934, was was the first of four books about the extraordinary nanny who arrived with the wind to look after two children in Edwardian London.The story received fresh attention in 1964 when Walt Disney turned it into a movie, starring Julie Andrews. But Ms. Travers, a fiercely private woman with an abiding interest in mythology, disliked the end product, saying it was too simplistic and toned down the darker side of the nanny's character.
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