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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 17, 2001
John Szarkowski, the curator emeritus of the Museum of Modern Art's photography department, once remarked that the most creative phase of most photographic careers lasts only about a decade. There are exceptions, of course: Alfred Stieglitz, who invented modern photography practically single-handedly, had at least three separate bursts of stunning originality over the course of his long career, each of which spanned a good 10 years. Henri Cartier-Bresson, the great French photojournalist, possessed a similar longevity, producing memorable images well into his 60s. And then there is Edward Weston (1886-1958)
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By Jason Edward Kaufman and Jason Edward Kaufman,Special to the Sun | July 7, 2002
WASHINGTON -- If you've ever hung a camera around your neck and gone in search of interesting motifs in nature, you've followed in the footsteps of Edward Weston (1886-1958). One of the great pioneering American art photographers of the second quarter of the 20th century, he created those sensuously sculptural close-ups of peppers, nautilus shells and nudes that have become paradigms of 20th-century photographic art. You may not have used a fancy view camera with large negatives, and probably didn't get such silky, sexy results, but you had the general idea.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 21, 1995
Although Robert Mapplethorpe is considered one of the finest photographers of his generation by curators and art historians, his openly homosexual lifestyle, his photographs of male nudes and male sexual acts, and his death at 42 of AIDS in 1989 have stirred controversy wherever his name arises.Mapplethorpe's work is notable for its classical beauty, but many can only think of him as a degenerate and his art as pornography.An exhibition opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art on Wednesday seeks to establish a more balanced perspective on Mapplethorpe by comparing his work to that of one of the century's leading photographers, Edward Weston.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 17, 2001
John Szarkowski, the curator emeritus of the Museum of Modern Art's photography department, once remarked that the most creative phase of most photographic careers lasts only about a decade. There are exceptions, of course: Alfred Stieglitz, who invented modern photography practically single-handedly, had at least three separate bursts of stunning originality over the course of his long career, each of which spanned a good 10 years. Henri Cartier-Bresson, the great French photojournalist, possessed a similar longevity, producing memorable images well into his 60s. And then there is Edward Weston (1886-1958)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jason Edward Kaufman and Jason Edward Kaufman,Special to the Sun | July 7, 2002
WASHINGTON -- If you've ever hung a camera around your neck and gone in search of interesting motifs in nature, you've followed in the footsteps of Edward Weston (1886-1958). One of the great pioneering American art photographers of the second quarter of the 20th century, he created those sensuously sculptural close-ups of peppers, nautilus shells and nudes that have become paradigms of 20th-century photographic art. You may not have used a fancy view camera with large negatives, and probably didn't get such silky, sexy results, but you had the general idea.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 7, 1994
You had to be there. I wasn't, but I heard about it.The opening of the University of Maryland Baltimore County's visual arts faculty biennial featured a "performance" of Hillary Kapan's piece "Sales Pitch [sic]." Here's what it looked like:A pitchfork sticks straight out from one wall. In front of it are suspended an American flag above a television set, held away from the pitchfork by 40 strings to which are attached dollar bills. People are invited to take one of the dollar bills, but to get one you have to cut one of the strings with a handy pair of scissors.
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By Ernest F. Imhoff | December 22, 1996
THE DAY Lincoln was inaugurated president, a young man ate breakfast at 5 a.m. in Baltimore and continued his walk from Boston to the celebration in Washington.The next day, March 5, 1861, The Baltimore Sun reported both events. On Page 1.Lincoln got the bigger play. But Edward Payson Weston got 30 lines of Baltimore type and, because of public enthusiasm all along his 478-mile walk in ten days, began a public career of long-distance walking that is hard to imagine today.His cross-country adventures went on for more than a half a century.
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By John Dorsey | March 11, 1999
The works of seven well-known American photographers appear in two concurrent art exhibits at the art gallery of the University of Maryland, College Park. One show, called "Chiaroscuro: Highlights and Shades of Six Photographers," includes 65 works by artists who emphasize light and shadow in their work.Ansel Adams and Edward Weston are represented by landscapes, Imogen Cunningham by close-ups of plants, Berenice Abbott by her New York Penn Station interior, Ruth Bernhard by surrealistic dolls and nudes, and Paul Strand by a Taos Pueblo church.
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By John Dorsey | January 25, 1996
Ansel Adams' photographs of the great scenery of the American West have become some of the most popular images in American photography. They capture the majesty of landscape and also speak of the aspirations of the human soul.An exhibit of about 50 Adams photographs, primarily from the first half of his career (he lived from 1902 to 1984), is on view at the gallery of Salisbury State University.Concurrently, there is a supporting exhibit of works by Edward Weston and Paul Strand, two photographers whose work influenced Adams.
NEWS
October 13, 1992
* Ben Maddow, 83, a novelist, biographer, poet and screenwriter whose work included the classic John Huston film "The Asphalt Jungle," died in a Hollywood hospital Friday of congestive heart failure. He worked as a ghostwriter under assumed names in order to survive blacklisting during the anti-Communist McCarthy era in the early 1950s. The writer was targeted as "unemployable" under his own name because of past left-wing affiliations. His illustrated biography of photographer Edward Weston was nominated for a National Book Award in 1974.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff | December 22, 1996
THE DAY Lincoln was inaugurated president, a young man ate breakfast at 5 a.m. in Baltimore and continued his walk from Boston to the celebration in Washington.The next day, March 5, 1861, The Baltimore Sun reported both events. On Page 1.Lincoln got the bigger play. But Edward Payson Weston got 30 lines of Baltimore type and, because of public enthusiasm all along his 478-mile walk in ten days, began a public career of long-distance walking that is hard to imagine today.His cross-country adventures went on for more than a half a century.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 21, 1995
Although Robert Mapplethorpe is considered one of the finest photographers of his generation by curators and art historians, his openly homosexual lifestyle, his photographs of male nudes and male sexual acts, and his death at 42 of AIDS in 1989 have stirred controversy wherever his name arises.Mapplethorpe's work is notable for its classical beauty, but many can only think of him as a degenerate and his art as pornography.An exhibition opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art on Wednesday seeks to establish a more balanced perspective on Mapplethorpe by comparing his work to that of one of the century's leading photographers, Edward Weston.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 7, 1994
You had to be there. I wasn't, but I heard about it.The opening of the University of Maryland Baltimore County's visual arts faculty biennial featured a "performance" of Hillary Kapan's piece "Sales Pitch [sic]." Here's what it looked like:A pitchfork sticks straight out from one wall. In front of it are suspended an American flag above a television set, held away from the pitchfork by 40 strings to which are attached dollar bills. People are invited to take one of the dollar bills, but to get one you have to cut one of the strings with a handy pair of scissors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 29, 2003
For more on the visual arts, go to www.SunSpot.net/artDimitra Lazaridou, a Greek-born artist whose large-scale color night photographs of deserted streets, buildings and parks are on view at C. Grimaldis Gallery through June 28, creates intensely seen images of modern-day Athens, where she now lives, that evoke a passionate mystery of loss and regret. Lazaridou's pictures of neglected working-class neighborhoods, factory buildings and deserted streets pay homage to the recent past without in any sense glorifying it. Many of the pictures are taken in immigrant neighborhoods that once were prosperous but that now are clearly in decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 2, 2003
Very few contemporary photographers continue to use the cumbersome, oversized 8x10 view camera so beloved by such photographic pioneers as Edward Weston and Ansel Adams. Peter Myma's large color landscapes at Craig Flinner Gallery through Oct. 29 are a reminder of what we have been missing. He follows in the long American tradition of heroic landscape that Weston and Adams helped claim for photography, while expanding their vision into the new realm of color. In "Building Storm," for example, Myma exploits the razor-sharp imagery of the 8x10 camera and the glassy, jewel-like surface of Ilfochrome paper to capture in pristine detail the emotional intensity of waxing natural forces.
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