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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 13, 1996
LONDON -- Once again, here is the story of the vain, love-struck king, who gave up his throne for the plain-looking, twice-divorced woman from Baltimore.The saga of King Edward VIII and Wallis Warfield Simpson has been written, filmed and acted nearly every way possible over almost 60 years. But yesterday, the royal love story of the century was told with a twist when Prince Edward -- Edward VIII's grand-nephew -- unveiled his own take on the couple's love during a media screening of a two-part television documentary.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | May 17, 2007
Earl Pruce, a local historian and retired librarian of the old News American who saved as many old newspaper stories and photographs as his department could house, died of cancer complications Tuesday at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 97. Born in Baltimore and raised on Quantico Avenue, he attended Forest Park High School, Maryland Institute College of Art and the old European Conservatory of Music on St. Paul Street, where he studied piano. In 1927, he joined the Baltimore American, then a daily morning paper, as a personal copy boy to the managing editor.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers Solis-Cohen Enterprises | October 24, 1993
Q: How old and valuable is my small "spool chair," which I inherited from an aunt? Its seat is only 13 1/2 inches off the floor, and the top of its back is just 32 1/2 inches high.A: Your American walnut side chair, dating from around 1850 to 1860, is called a "spool chair" because of the way its legs, stretcher, stiles, spindles and top rail have been turned, or carved, on a lathe to resemble empty spools of thread placed end to end. Its size suggests it probably was made for a child. Victorian furniture dealer Joan Bogart (P.O.
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By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | August 22, 2004
The nonfiction book of this summer (dalliance division) is Eleanor Herman's Sex With Kings: 500 Years of Adultery, Power, Rivalry and Revenge (Morrow, 287 pages, $25.95). Herman, native to Baltimore (and a history student while at Towson University), now lives in Virginia. She has been prowling the archives; she knows where the bodies were before burial; she writes and you are shocked! and giggling, and in favor of royalty -- so long as it keeps its full oceanic distance. The author, alas, seems to have nothing on Queen Victoria.
NEWS
November 26, 1995
Ethel Casey, 69, a soprano who once sang at New York's Carnegie Hall, died early Wednesday in a fire at her home in Raleigh, Va. Her 1961 appearance at Town Hall in New York City introduced works by Arnold Shoenberg and other contemporary composers to the United States. She sang at Carnegie Hall in 1962, and was the vocalist that year for the International Western Festival at the Seattle World's Fair.Edna Deane, 90, the world champion ballroom dancer famous for being the girl "who's danced with the prince of Wales," died Wednesday in London.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 4, 2002
Poor Wallis Simpson! History is treating her more and more harshly with each passing year. If things keep going this way, in another decade or so, revisionist historians will be blaming even World War II on the Baltimore socialite for whom King Edward VIII gave up his throne. OK, I'm exaggerating - but not by much. Wait until you see how Simpson is treated in Masterpiece Theatre's "Bertie & Elizabeth," the story of King George VI (Albert was one of his other names) and his wife, Elizabeth, who today is England's beloved, 101-year-old Queen Mum. Naturally, British historians never liked Simpson much, but in films made 20 years or so ago, she was at least treated as glamorous and alluring.
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | November 30, 1991
The name of Wallis Warfield Simpson, the wife of the Duke ofWindsor, was spelled incorrectly in yesterday's editions.The Sun regrets the errors.LONDON -- Did the Duke of Windsor spy for the Germans during the Second World War? Did his wife, the former Bessie Wallace Warfield Simpson, pass classified information to the Nazis?It has long been known in Britain and elsewhere that King Edward VIII, who gave up his throne on Dec. 11, 1936, to marry a twice-divorced former debutante from Baltimore, was sympathetic to Germany.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 15, 1995
LONDON -- Diana talks.In the celebrity chat show of the year, Princess Diana discusses her marital breakup during an hourlong interview to be aired Monday night by the British Broadcasting Corp.The interview comes 16 months after Prince Charles used a TV documentary to reveal he had been unfaithful to his wife. The couple has been separated for more than two years."It will cover every step of her life as Princess of Wales, her family, her separation and her future plans," a BBC spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson | December 10, 1992
PRINCE Charles and Lady Diana have gone modern. They'r separating, but not divorcing. She can still be his queen once he takes the throne, they'll have what amounts to joint custody of the children and the two will appear together from time to time.Queen Elizabeth, meanwhile, hopes the "intrusions into the privacy of the prince and the princess may now cease."But this 1992 arrangement, as up-to-date as Murphy Brown, may not wash with the British public and certainly will only whet the appetite of the press.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 18, 2000
The program for the Shakespeare Theatre's latest production describes the setting as, "The landscape of King Richard II's mind." Unfortunately, in this interpretation it's not an especially interesting mind to visit. Director Gerald Freedman's metaphorical setting makes some sense since, for most of "Richard II," the king is unable to see beyond himself. As portrayed by Wallace Acton, he's a weary, almost apathetic hedonist, a man who doesn't give a great deal of thought to much of anything, except self-indulgence.
NEWS
By Al Webb | February 11, 2003
LONDON - The future king of England was perhaps an understandably titillating diversion, but a car salesman? Wallis Warfield Simpson's seductive arts indeed transcended class barriers, if not particularly wisely for an American who dreamed of wearing a queen's crown. What's happened here is a spanking new twist on an old royal scandal - plus the makings of a new folk hero - that the British have lapped up newspaper page by page, not to mention a titillating break from a lot of boring war stuff.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 4, 2002
Poor Wallis Simpson! History is treating her more and more harshly with each passing year. If things keep going this way, in another decade or so, revisionist historians will be blaming even World War II on the Baltimore socialite for whom King Edward VIII gave up his throne. OK, I'm exaggerating - but not by much. Wait until you see how Simpson is treated in Masterpiece Theatre's "Bertie & Elizabeth," the story of King George VI (Albert was one of his other names) and his wife, Elizabeth, who today is England's beloved, 101-year-old Queen Mum. Naturally, British historians never liked Simpson much, but in films made 20 years or so ago, she was at least treated as glamorous and alluring.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 18, 2000
The program for the Shakespeare Theatre's latest production describes the setting as, "The landscape of King Richard II's mind." Unfortunately, in this interpretation it's not an especially interesting mind to visit. Director Gerald Freedman's metaphorical setting makes some sense since, for most of "Richard II," the king is unable to see beyond himself. As portrayed by Wallace Acton, he's a weary, almost apathetic hedonist, a man who doesn't give a great deal of thought to much of anything, except self-indulgence.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
Documents released last week by the British government recalled the Duke and Duchess of Windsor's more than flirtatious interest in Nazi Germany and his abdication 60 years ago this week.H. L. Mencken, the Baltimore journalist, described the story of the couple's love affair and his eventual abdication on Dec. 11, 1936, as the "greatest story since the Crucifixion."After the abdication and until his death in 1972 and hers 14 years later, the couple remained wealthy curiosities from another age and another time.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1996
Can't get enough of those wacky Windsors? Think the current brood, Andrew and Fergie, Charles and Diana, et al., have a monopoly on the dysfunctional-royals franchise? Then check out public television tonight and be entertained, enlightened and informed."Ellen" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Ellen tries on her best friend's engagement ring, then can't get it off her finger. Hilarity ensues. ABC."Dateline NBC" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Correspondent Keith Morrison interviews Aaron Spelling, that paragon of television excellence responsible for "Charlie's Angels," "The Love Boat," "Melrose Place," "Beverly Hills, 90210," "Fantasy Island" and "Savannah."
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 13, 1996
LONDON -- Once again, here is the story of the vain, love-struck king, who gave up his throne for the plain-looking, twice-divorced woman from Baltimore.The saga of King Edward VIII and Wallis Warfield Simpson has been written, filmed and acted nearly every way possible over almost 60 years. But yesterday, the royal love story of the century was told with a twist when Prince Edward -- Edward VIII's grand-nephew -- unveiled his own take on the couple's love during a media screening of a two-part television documentary.
NEWS
By Al Webb | February 11, 2003
LONDON - The future king of England was perhaps an understandably titillating diversion, but a car salesman? Wallis Warfield Simpson's seductive arts indeed transcended class barriers, if not particularly wisely for an American who dreamed of wearing a queen's crown. What's happened here is a spanking new twist on an old royal scandal - plus the makings of a new folk hero - that the British have lapped up newspaper page by page, not to mention a titillating break from a lot of boring war stuff.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1996
Can't get enough of those wacky Windsors? Think the current brood, Andrew and Fergie, Charles and Diana, et al., have a monopoly on the dysfunctional-royals franchise? Then check out public television tonight and be entertained, enlightened and informed."Ellen" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Ellen tries on her best friend's engagement ring, then can't get it off her finger. Hilarity ensues. ABC."Dateline NBC" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Correspondent Keith Morrison interviews Aaron Spelling, that paragon of television excellence responsible for "Charlie's Angels," "The Love Boat," "Melrose Place," "Beverly Hills, 90210," "Fantasy Island" and "Savannah."
NEWS
November 26, 1995
Ethel Casey, 69, a soprano who once sang at New York's Carnegie Hall, died early Wednesday in a fire at her home in Raleigh, Va. Her 1961 appearance at Town Hall in New York City introduced works by Arnold Shoenberg and other contemporary composers to the United States. She sang at Carnegie Hall in 1962, and was the vocalist that year for the International Western Festival at the Seattle World's Fair.Edna Deane, 90, the world champion ballroom dancer famous for being the girl "who's danced with the prince of Wales," died Wednesday in London.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 15, 1995
LONDON -- Diana talks.In the celebrity chat show of the year, Princess Diana discusses her marital breakup during an hourlong interview to be aired Monday night by the British Broadcasting Corp.The interview comes 16 months after Prince Charles used a TV documentary to reveal he had been unfaithful to his wife. The couple has been separated for more than two years."It will cover every step of her life as Princess of Wales, her family, her separation and her future plans," a BBC spokeswoman said.
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