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Edward Snowden

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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 7, 2013
During the long Cold War between the United States and the former Soviet Union, when a spy from either side defected he was said to be "coming in from the cold. " In the evolving case of Edward Snowden, the self-described whistleblower on National Security Agency secrets, he seems to be having an uncommonly difficult time accomplishing it. His flight from his NSA surveillance job in Hawaii to Hong Kong, while causing shock and distress to the Obama administration, at first came off as another example of a fed-up insider deciding his country was in the wrong and letting let his conscience be his guide.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
The officials who are responsible for safeguarding the nation's intelligence secrets are trying to figure out how to better vet millions of employees and contractors with security clearances, after auditors found that some of those workers owed more than three-quarters of a billion dollars in unpaid taxes. About 83,000 employees and contractors at the Department of Defense owed more than $730 million in unpaid taxes, the Government Accountability Office reported last month. Last year, the agency reported that 8,400 executive-branch civilian employees and contractors owed $85 million.
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NEWS
January 9, 2014
National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, a former Baltimore area resident, should be returned to the U.S. from Russia by force if necessary ( "How can President Obama defend NSA spying on U.S. citizens?" Jan. 5). In 1953, the government hired professional bounty hunters to find and return a high-profile couple after they were discovered hiding in Mexico. Both were given hefty prison sentences. President Obama ought to work on ways to return Mr. Snowden using whatever means are necessary.
NEWS
By Gary Sullivan | August 27, 2014
Countless sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines, along with civilian specialists, have passed through the heavily guarded gates of the National Security Agency just down the pike from Baltimore in the world's safest suburb - Fort Meade. I served in the Naval Security Group back in the seventies, when NSA stood for "No Such Agency. " The Cold War. The good old days. Moral clarity. Secrets generally stayed secret, give or take an occasional heart-stopping front page article in the New York Times.
NEWS
By Matthew F. Ferraro | June 9, 2014
In the year since Edward Snowden's first leaks, the reputation of the U.S. intelligence services has taken a beating, especially by the millennial generation. After everything that's been said about the alleged malevolence of the CIA and the other agencies, many in the under-33 set wonder why anyone would want to get mixed up with them. As a millennial who grew up on a steady diet of scandals - in business, government and even religious organizations - that shook our confidence in almost every major institution, I get it. I'm a natural skeptic, too. But when I took an intelligence job in my early 20s, I encountered a different, heartening reality.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
If Edward Snowden "faced the consequences" of his actions, he would spend the rest of his life in isolated torture or even be executed ("Edward Snowden's 'Amazing Race,'" June 28). It's no wonder he prefers a life on the run. Some call him a traitor; others praise him as one of the greatest American heroes since Paul Revere. Perhaps Mr. Snowden decried the leaking of classified secrets years ago, yet when this NSA contract employee discovered the extent of the government's spying and data collecting, he took it upon himself to blow the whistle.
NEWS
August 24, 2013
The keepers of our classified national secrets ought to be ashamed. To think that two low-level employees like Bradley Manning (aka "Chelsea") and Edward Snowden were allowed access to the crown jewels of the national security establishment is an embarrassment. I never thought I'd see the day when an American would seek political asylum in Russia or a man sentenced to Fort Leavenworth would demand to live as a woman. What's wrong with this picture? Everything! Roz Ellis
NEWS
August 13, 2013
Let's not start Cold War II - one was quite enough! President Barack Obama's cancellation of the summit talks with Russia's Vladimir Putin was childish, short-sighted and unnecessary ( "No summit, small loss," Aug. 7). No doubt many are furious that NSA whistle blower Edward Snowden slipped away to Russia, but it's time to stay calm and carry on. Too much is at stake today, and this American hissy fit is an embarrassment. I find it ironic that Mr. Obama canceled the summit yet at the same time has proposed ways to put the brakes on U.S. intelligence agencies that are trampling the Constitution and spying unnecessarily on law-abiding American citizens!
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Let history decide whether Edward Snowden is a hero or traitor ( "Snowden speaks," May 30). After reading "No Place to Hide" by Glenn Greenwald, that question is moot. I was shocked by what the book revealed. Whether the information Mr. Snowden provided is true or not, we need to know. Believing our government is creating a data base of my phone calls, my emails, my postings on Facebook, my comments on Twitter (if I made any) and my communication through Skype is horrific. It is vital to find out if what Mr. Snowden leaked is, indeed, fact.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
As a former co-worker of Thomas Drake, whose work I held in highest regard, I was deeply incensed to see his name linked with those of Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden ("We need more whistle-blowers," June 23). Mr. Drake was a mature, ethical, skilled professional and a true whistle-blower. He was not a callow youth with a dangerously limited understanding or appreciation of the intelligence community, or someone whose revelations were driven by personal ignorance and hubris. Mr. Drake saw a situation in which the National Security Agency was wasting valuable time, manpower and money designing and developing a project that, in many ways, duplicated existing systems that actually did the job better.
NEWS
By Matthew F. Ferraro | June 9, 2014
In the year since Edward Snowden's first leaks, the reputation of the U.S. intelligence services has taken a beating, especially by the millennial generation. After everything that's been said about the alleged malevolence of the CIA and the other agencies, many in the under-33 set wonder why anyone would want to get mixed up with them. As a millennial who grew up on a steady diet of scandals - in business, government and even religious organizations - that shook our confidence in almost every major institution, I get it. I'm a natural skeptic, too. But when I took an intelligence job in my early 20s, I encountered a different, heartening reality.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
I was surprised by your editorial on the NBC interview with Edward Snowden ( "Snowden speaks," May 29). I consider myself fairly objective, yet I heard very different responses from Mr. Snowden than the editorial suggests. It was almost a cognitive dissonance, as though I had watched a different show. For example, I did not hear Mr. Snowden saying he would like to be a hero. I heard a highly intelligent and relatively humble Mr. Snowden saying he did what he felt was right for the American people.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Your editorial urging Edward Snowden to return and face the consequences of his civil disobedience would have been appropriate as recently as 15 years ago ( "Snowden speaks," May 30). Back then, there was a country called the United States of America that did not practice torture, conduct secret trials, detain suspects indefinitely and execute citizens without trial. Unfortunately, if you want Mr. Snowden to return to that country, you'll have to provide him with a time machine.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Let history decide whether Edward Snowden is a hero or traitor ( "Snowden speaks," May 30). After reading "No Place to Hide" by Glenn Greenwald, that question is moot. I was shocked by what the book revealed. Whether the information Mr. Snowden provided is true or not, we need to know. Believing our government is creating a data base of my phone calls, my emails, my postings on Facebook, my comments on Twitter (if I made any) and my communication through Skype is horrific. It is vital to find out if what Mr. Snowden leaked is, indeed, fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
NBC News and anchorman Brian Williams have not done journalistic work the quality of Wednesday night's exclusive interview with Edward Snowden in a long, long time. Since NBC News had the interview for a week, according to Williams, it could have done more reporting on some of Snowden's statements. For example, he said he was not merely a systems analyst or the "hacker" as President Obama dismissively characterized him, but rather an employee of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency trained as a traditional spy. He said he worked overseas under fake names in cover occupations for both agencies.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2014
The Pulitzer Prizes to two news outlets that cooperated with whistleblower Edward Snowden in the disclosure of widespread National Security Agency surveillance of electronic communications at home and abroad has U.S. officialdom in a dither. With the exiled Mr. Snowden harbored in Russia and widely branded at home as a traitor for leaking the voluminous evidence to reporters working for The Washington Post and the U.S. arm of Britain's Guardian newspaper, the Pulitzer committee came down squarely on the side of freedom of the press.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Your editorial urging Edward Snowden to return and face the consequences of his civil disobedience would have been appropriate as recently as 15 years ago ( "Snowden speaks," May 30). Back then, there was a country called the United States of America that did not practice torture, conduct secret trials, detain suspects indefinitely and execute citizens without trial. Unfortunately, if you want Mr. Snowden to return to that country, you'll have to provide him with a time machine.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Between Jonathan Pollard, Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, which one is the most dangerous to our country? Mr. Pollard took secrets and gave them to our ally, Israel, and is serving 25 years as of this writing. Messrs. Manning and Snowden gave information about what our government was doing to protect us from our enemies. One is on trial for treason, and the other is a coward who is hiding trying not to be caught. He should be caught and brought to trial. I have no reason to be afraid if the government listens to me on the phone.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
The more I read about Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency consultant who leaked thousands of classified documents to the media, the more disgusted and concerned I am ("Snowden tells tech crowd: Improve protection of data," March 11). Why didn't Mr. Snowden discuss what he considered to be a U.S. government weakness with the appropriate federal departments so that corrective measures could have been taken by Congress? In my opinion, Mr. Snowden is a traitor who should have been summoned to court long ago to stand trial.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, who has established himself as an authority on intelligence issues in Congress, will face a Democratic primary in June from an opponent who has spent his career working in the intel community. Paul Rundquist, a 25-year-old Gaithersburg resident, works as a contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy, reviewing Cold War-era documents slated for declassification to make sure they don't contain nuclear secrets. Before that he worked as a contract intelligence analyst for the agency.
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