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Edward Hopper

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TRAVEL
November 4, 2010
'Modern Life: Edward Hopper and His Time' at the Whitney What: A new exhibition about Edward Hopper that examines his work in relationship to that of his contemporaries. Whitney Museum curator Barbara Haskell and assistant Sasha Nicholas have done a service for Hopper's many fans by showing his work within the broader artistic community of his era. "Modern Life: Edward Hopper and His Time" features about 85 works in a range of media by Hopper and his associates, including some of Hopper's rarely exhibited early paintings and works on paper.
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TRAVEL
November 4, 2010
'Modern Life: Edward Hopper and His Time' at the Whitney What: A new exhibition about Edward Hopper that examines his work in relationship to that of his contemporaries. Whitney Museum curator Barbara Haskell and assistant Sasha Nicholas have done a service for Hopper's many fans by showing his work within the broader artistic community of his era. "Modern Life: Edward Hopper and His Time" features about 85 works in a range of media by Hopper and his associates, including some of Hopper's rarely exhibited early paintings and works on paper.
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NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | September 16, 2007
Edward Hopper was the greatest American realist painter of the 20th century. Yet to label Hopper a realist also risks misstating the peculiar quality of his genius. The world of Hopper's paintings feels deeply familiar, but it is also deeply strange - preternaturally silent, austere and inward looking, peopled by isolated, disconnected individuals trapped in moods of reverie, anticipation or despair in unprepossessing spaces that only emphasize the emotional distance between them. Hopper's most famous images - lonely city storefronts and apartment buildings, lamp-lit hotel rooms and offices, gingerbread seaside homes and rocky beaches splashed by slanting shafts of sunlight - are the stuff of realistic depiction, but he also made them uncanny, as if they were clues to a riddle that we can never quite unravel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
The average museumgoer would not look at a series of paintings about loneliness and think "live theatrical adaptation." Leon Major, artistic director of the Maryland Opera Studio for the University of Maryland, is not the average museumgoer, and according to his colleagues, his directorial work could not be further from this description.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 30, 1993
Next at Spotlighters: 'Bathroom Humor'Bedroom farces often have their share of bathroom humor, so "Bathroom Humor," by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore, would appear to be the next logical step. Presented at the Spotlighters, 817 St. Paul St., for four weekends beginning Friday, the comedy will mark the directorial debut of Anne Pardoe.And, thanks to its bathroom setting, it may be one of the only scripts whose set fits the scale of the tiny Spotlighters stage. Show times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. through June 27. Tickets are $8 and $9. For more information, call (410)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 17, 1998
The retrospective of Barry Nemett's work now appearing at Goucher shows clearly what this artist does best.It reaches back to the late 1960s and encompasses more than 100 works, the vast majority of which are small- to medium-scale. Most are drawings and gouaches (a form of watercolor) of birds, animals, trees, books and the like. They reveal a superb draftsman, a colorist of nuance and subtlety, a lover of nature and books who can make them sing with that love in works such as "Couple" (two books)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
Like many of the people who mobbed the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday, Elizabeth King said she didn't mean to wait until the last minute to view the temporary exhibition of modern masterpieces on display."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Aaron Chester and Aaron Chester,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
The average museumgoer would not look at a series of paintings about loneliness and think "live theatrical adaptation." Leon Major, artistic director of the Maryland Opera Studio for the University of Maryland, is not the average museumgoer, and according to his colleagues, his directorial work could not be further from this description.
NEWS
By BENNARD B. PERLMAN | January 17, 1992
In Nyack, a village picturesquely perched on the banks of theHudson River, Helen Hayes has lived, appropriately enough, on a street named Broadway for the past 61 years. Her beautifully preserved clapboard house, with its corinthian-columned front porch and topped by a cupola, is surrounded by a high brick wall on three sides, but the open section at the back allows an uninterrupted panorama of gently sloping lawns and the tranquil river beyond.It is a scene of which paintings are made.And soon enough the 91-year-old grand dame of the American stage steered the conversation toward artists, telling tales involving Renoir, Degas, El Greco, Arthur B. Davies and Walt Kuhn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jan Winburn and By Jan Winburn,Sun Staff | March 19, 2000
"Pure Poetry," by Binnie Kirshenbaum. Simon & Schuster. 203 pages. $22. Lila Moscowitz is a loud-mouthed, neurotic poet who is starved for words but has not lost her appetite for sex, lies or hurtful one-liners. She's not the girl-next-door; she's certainly no man's best friend. And if she is supposed to represent the "modern" woman, God help us. She makes Ally McBeal look deep. Binnie Kirshenbaum renders Lila, the main character in her novel "Pure Poetry," with flair, humor and a strong voice.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | September 16, 2007
Edward Hopper was the greatest American realist painter of the 20th century. Yet to label Hopper a realist also risks misstating the peculiar quality of his genius. The world of Hopper's paintings feels deeply familiar, but it is also deeply strange - preternaturally silent, austere and inward looking, peopled by isolated, disconnected individuals trapped in moods of reverie, anticipation or despair in unprepossessing spaces that only emphasize the emotional distance between them. Hopper's most famous images - lonely city storefronts and apartment buildings, lamp-lit hotel rooms and offices, gingerbread seaside homes and rocky beaches splashed by slanting shafts of sunlight - are the stuff of realistic depiction, but he also made them uncanny, as if they were clues to a riddle that we can never quite unravel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 19, 2000
After Andy Warhol, it has been said, art could look like anything. For that reason alone, Warhol may go down in history as one of the pivotal artists of the 20th century. He is credited with liberating American art from the last vestiges of European modernist orthodoxy, and his influence on the generation of artists who followed has been enormous. His Pop Art movement of the 1960s was probably of greater significance to later art than was the abstract expressionist movement that preceded it. Moreover, Warhol was the most famous art world personality of his day, a consummate manipulator of the media who cultivated a celebrity image rivaling that of Picasso and Matisse even among people who knew little about art. Not surprisingly, Warhol was also one of the most controversial artists of his age. His detractors called him a lightweight who was disengaged from the important issues of his day. The public was amused by his soup cans and celebrity portraits but also inclined to see him as a fop and a fool, a hypester who shamelessly parlayed the ephemera and kitsch of pop culture into a hugely remunerative scam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jan Winburn and By Jan Winburn,Sun Staff | March 19, 2000
"Pure Poetry," by Binnie Kirshenbaum. Simon & Schuster. 203 pages. $22. Lila Moscowitz is a loud-mouthed, neurotic poet who is starved for words but has not lost her appetite for sex, lies or hurtful one-liners. She's not the girl-next-door; she's certainly no man's best friend. And if she is supposed to represent the "modern" woman, God help us. She makes Ally McBeal look deep. Binnie Kirshenbaum renders Lila, the main character in her novel "Pure Poetry," with flair, humor and a strong voice.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | November 17, 1998
The retrospective of Barry Nemett's work now appearing at Goucher shows clearly what this artist does best.It reaches back to the late 1960s and encompasses more than 100 works, the vast majority of which are small- to medium-scale. Most are drawings and gouaches (a form of watercolor) of birds, animals, trees, books and the like. They reveal a superb draftsman, a colorist of nuance and subtlety, a lover of nature and books who can make them sing with that love in works such as "Couple" (two books)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 30, 1993
Next at Spotlighters: 'Bathroom Humor'Bedroom farces often have their share of bathroom humor, so "Bathroom Humor," by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore, would appear to be the next logical step. Presented at the Spotlighters, 817 St. Paul St., for four weekends beginning Friday, the comedy will mark the directorial debut of Anne Pardoe.And, thanks to its bathroom setting, it may be one of the only scripts whose set fits the scale of the tiny Spotlighters stage. Show times are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. through June 27. Tickets are $8 and $9. For more information, call (410)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
Like many of the people who mobbed the Baltimore Museum of Art yesterday, Elizabeth King said she didn't mean to wait until the last minute to view the temporary exhibition of modern masterpieces on display."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | November 19, 2000
After Andy Warhol, it has been said, art could look like anything. For that reason alone, Warhol may go down in history as one of the pivotal artists of the 20th century. He is credited with liberating American art from the last vestiges of European modernist orthodoxy, and his influence on the generation of artists who followed has been enormous. His Pop Art movement of the 1960s was probably of greater significance to later art than was the abstract expressionist movement that preceded it. Moreover, Warhol was the most famous art world personality of his day, a consummate manipulator of the media who cultivated a celebrity image rivaling that of Picasso and Matisse even among people who knew little about art. Not surprisingly, Warhol was also one of the most controversial artists of his age. His detractors called him a lightweight who was disengaged from the important issues of his day. The public was amused by his soup cans and celebrity portraits but also inclined to see him as a fop and a fool, a hypester who shamelessly parlayed the ephemera and kitsch of pop culture into a hugely remunerative scam.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Chicken is for the cook what canvas is for the painter.--Brillat-Savarin, 18th century French gastronomePicture the dinner party of the '80s: A canvas by Gustav Klimt -- rich, lush and exotic, with surreal, even disturbing, combinations.Now picture an evening meal for friends in the '90s: A scene by Edward Hopper -- all clear, plain light with straight angles, and simple fare.Dump the duck ravioli and bag the champagne zabaglione. Scratch off Donald Trump and concoct a toast to Harry Truman.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Chicken is for the cook what canvas is for the painter.--Brillat-Savarin, 18th century French gastronomePicture the dinner party of the '80s: A canvas by Gustav Klimt -- rich, lush and exotic, with surreal, even disturbing, combinations.Now picture an evening meal for friends in the '90s: A scene by Edward Hopper -- all clear, plain light with straight angles, and simple fare.Dump the duck ravioli and bag the champagne zabaglione. Scratch off Donald Trump and concoct a toast to Harry Truman.
NEWS
By BENNARD B. PERLMAN | January 17, 1992
In Nyack, a village picturesquely perched on the banks of theHudson River, Helen Hayes has lived, appropriately enough, on a street named Broadway for the past 61 years. Her beautifully preserved clapboard house, with its corinthian-columned front porch and topped by a cupola, is surrounded by a high brick wall on three sides, but the open section at the back allows an uninterrupted panorama of gently sloping lawns and the tranquil river beyond.It is a scene of which paintings are made.And soon enough the 91-year-old grand dame of the American stage steered the conversation toward artists, telling tales involving Renoir, Degas, El Greco, Arthur B. Davies and Walt Kuhn.
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