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By Dennis Bartel | May 20, 1998
PRESENTLY in the classical music work there is much hand-wringing over a controversial ethical question that also has consequences in realms beyond music. It involves the Third Symphony of Great Britain's beloved composer Sir Edward Elgar.As music lovers know, Elgar wrote two symphonies, both masterpieces. After the death of his wife, Alice, in 1920, he withdrew into a prolonged depression and wrote no more music until the 1930s, when his friend George Bernard Shaw persuaded him to write his way out of depression with a new symphony.
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NEWS
By Dennis Bartel | May 20, 1998
PRESENTLY in the classical music work there is much hand-wringing over a controversial ethical question that also has consequences in realms beyond music. It involves the Third Symphony of Great Britain's beloved composer Sir Edward Elgar.As music lovers know, Elgar wrote two symphonies, both masterpieces. After the death of his wife, Alice, in 1920, he withdrew into a prolonged depression and wrote no more music until the 1930s, when his friend George Bernard Shaw persuaded him to write his way out of depression with a new symphony.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
"Gerontius," by James Hamilton-Paterson, 264 pages, Soho Press Inc., New York, N.Y., $19.95.SIR EDWARD ELGAR was quite simply the first great British composer in nearly two centuries. British music between Henry Purcell and Elgar was pretty much an oxymoron, John Gay and Sir William Sullivan.Elgar reluctantly embodied British music. He looked like a veritable Colonel Blimp. His "Land of Hope and Glory" from the first "Pomp and Circumstance" march epitomizes chauvinistic British patriotism.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | June 5, 1991
"Gerontius," by James Hamilton-Paterson, 264 pages, Soho Press Inc., New York, N.Y., $19.95.SIR EDWARD ELGAR was quite simply the first great British composer in nearly two centuries. British music between Henry Purcell and Elgar was pretty much an oxymoron, John Gay and Sir William Sullivan.Elgar reluctantly embodied British music. He looked like a veritable Colonel Blimp. His "Land of Hope and Glory" from the first "Pomp and Circumstance" march epitomizes chauvinistic British patriotism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | February 19, 1998
"The Secret Garden" is one of the loveliest books ever written for children, and Oakland Ballet has made a ballet of it that's just as beautiful. The California company will bring its full-length production to the Gordon Center in Owings Mills this weekend.Frances Hodgson Burnett's novel, written in 1911, tells the story of Mary Lennox, a selfish, spoiled girl who is orphaned by a cholera epidemic that kills her parents in India. She is sent to live with a reclusive uncle whose vast estate is on the windy, stormy moors of Yorkshire.
NEWS
December 12, 2002
Composer Tobias Picker will join the Columbia Orchestra in a performance of his work The Encantadas, a musical picture of the Galapagos Islands, at 8 p.m. Saturday at Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts. The concert, "To the Sea," will include a performance by mezzo-soprano Kyle Engler of Edward Elgar's Sea Pictures, Op. 37, a series of poems about the sea and sailing. The Encantadas is based on a collection of 10 essays of the same name by Herman Melville describing his visit to the Galapagos to research the novel Moby Dick, said Tedd Griepentrog, the orchestra's executive director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | June 18, 2000
"Aqui esta encerrada el alma de ... " This tantalizing inscription in Spanish was written by Sir Edward Elgar on the score of his Violin Concerto in 1910. When asked by a friend to translate and explain it, he responded: "Here, or more emphatically 'in here,' is enshrined or simply enclosed -- 'buried' is perhaps too definite -- the soul of? The final 'de' leaves it indefinite as to sex or rather gender." He might as well just have said, "That's for me to know and for you to find out." Several candidates have been proposed as being the source of the enshrined or enclosed soul, all of them female.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 10, 2001
With the exception of vintage silent movies, which leap to life when accompanied by an orchestra, there are few visual products that make a perfect match for a symphonic score. One or the other component, but most likely the musical one, is bound to suffer. And so it was last night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra presented Gustav Holst's popular showpiece The Planets with introductory remarks for each movement by Baltimore's own celestial frequent flyer, NASA astronaut Thomas Jones, and a film of each orbiting body in question.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 14, 2001
Elmar Oliveira's recent recital was notable not just for the way he played - rich tone, impeccable intonation and articulation, deeply considered phrasing - but for what he played during the Shriver Hall Concert Series at the Johns Hopkins University. Oliveira, stepping in for an indisposed Pamela Frank, demonstrated aristocratic violin playing Sunday in one of Mozart's less frequently encountered sonatas, and in Edward Elgar and Ernest Bloch sonatas from the corners of the repertoire.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler HTC and Stephen Wigler HTC,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 31, 1997
Among the great English composers, Edward Elgar was "distinguished" by a tin ear when it came to poetry. "The Music Makers," the composer's penultimate chorus-and-orchestra work, is a setting of an amateurish poem by one Arthur O'Shaughnessy, an expert on reptiles who would have been well-advised to have confined himself to those creatures.A composer need not have a good text to produce good music. But it's a measure of the weaknesses of "The Music Makers" that its best passages are those Elgar cannibalized from his earlier works.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 1998
In yesterday's review of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's weekend concerts, tenor John Aler was incorrectly identified as a British singer. He is from Baltimore.The Sun regrets the error.Christopher Seaman bade farewell this weekend to his job as resident conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra with an excessively trivial but charming program: an all-British bill of fare that re-created one of Sir Henry Wood's pre-World War II "Promenade" concerts at the Queen's Hall in London.These were the original pops concerts, first copied successfully by Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 15, 1994
The Concert Artists of Baltimore under Edward Polochick opened its season Saturday night with a reverse history of the Romantic era.Mr. Polochick titled his program "Words and Music." The various staging shifts at LeClerc Hall at the College of Notre Dame at times resembled well-rehearsed confusion, but the musical rewards were very clear and at times revelatory.Edward Polochick is a conductor who tries to inspire his musicians from the podium. He is best with his singers. They watch his every move and seem in tune with his conception of the music.
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