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Edward Bennett Williams

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NEWS
March 29, 1992
Edward Bennett Williams was a Washingtonian. That fact hovered darkly over Orioles fans.For the years Williams owned the team, Baltimoreans worried that their ballclub was in the hands of an out-of-towner, a man who could choose at any moment to move the Orioles down the parkway to D.C.To be sure, Williams -- tough, gruff, a superstar lawyer and Washington power broker -- never actually threatened to take the club from Baltimore. He didn't have to. The thought lingered, unspoken. Even as fans set attendance records at Memorial Stadium, Williams complained that the ballpark was inadequate, unprofitable and badly located.
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NEWS
January 9, 2003
EDDIE MURRAY'S election this week to the Baseball Hall of Fame is a reminder that there are two national pastimes, one on the field and another off. Without question, Mr. Murray, the switch-hitting first baseman who played 12 1/2 seasons with the Orioles, deserved his ascent to Cooperstown because of his achievements on the diamond. That he only got the support of 85 percent of the sportswriters who control entry to the Hall reflects his now almost noble unwillingness to speak for himself in any way but his remarkably consistent high level of play.
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FEATURES
By Evan Thomas | December 8, 1991
Edward Bennett Williams's greatest sporting ambition was to own a major league baseball team. The boy who had sold "ice colds and red hots" for the minor league Hartford Senators wanted to own the big league Washington Senators. He had bought into the football Redskins only after he failed to win a baseball franchise in Washington in 1961. In 1972, he had tried again to get a team in Washington but failed in an attempt to move the San Diego Padres. Undaunted, he kept searching for weak franchises that might want to move to the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Kurt Rheinheimer | March 31, 2002
ROANOKE, Va. - I was eight when the Orioles came to town, and it was the best thing that ever happened to me. People told me I was a precocious third-grader, reading the paper every day, listening to the radio for hours at a time. I was not, of course. I was simply one fan among a million others, so proud to be a part of the crowd at Memorial Stadium, of the reborn pair of beautiful big-league words that now defined my hometown: Baltimore Orioles. And yes, nearly everything in the world has changed since 1954.
SPORTS
August 8, 1991
Baltimore's constant fear of losing the Orioles has brought a couple more prospective buyers to light, according to The Sun.Appliance store giant Jack Luskin and his nephew, attorney Steven L. Miles, yesterday said they have made some early forays into purchasing the team from Eli Jacobs.Jacobs indicated in June he may be ready to sell the club. The first Baltimorean to say he would be interested in buying was Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, the chairman of Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc., which operates a chain of clothing stores.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | November 25, 1991
THE MAN TO SEE. Edward Bennett Williams: Ultimate Insider, Legendary Trial Lawyer. By Evan Thomas. Simon & Schuster. 587 pages. $27.50.FOR THOSE naive citizens who live outside the Capital Beltway, this excellent work is as much a revelation of how the Washington power structure works as it is a biography of one of the century's greatest defense lawyers. Edward Bennett Williams was indeed powerful and, relatively, his only real failure came when he ventured afield to buy the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
January 9, 2003
EDDIE MURRAY'S election this week to the Baseball Hall of Fame is a reminder that there are two national pastimes, one on the field and another off. Without question, Mr. Murray, the switch-hitting first baseman who played 12 1/2 seasons with the Orioles, deserved his ascent to Cooperstown because of his achievements on the diamond. That he only got the support of 85 percent of the sportswriters who control entry to the Hall reflects his now almost noble unwillingness to speak for himself in any way but his remarkably consistent high level of play.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | July 8, 1991
Proof of the Orioles' pitching woes is that they were the las club in the majors to produce a five-game winner. They barely made it by the All-Star break when Jeff Ballard won No. 5 (against nine losses) yesterday in the 5-3 win over the New York Yankees.The next-to-last team to have a pitcher reach that plateau was Cleveland, which has the worst record in the big leagues (26-53). The Indians' Greg Swindell beat Milwaukee Saturday to go 5-7.* Orioles pitcher Dave Johnson, apparently over the groin injury that put him on the disabled list May 19, told visitors to Hagerstown Friday night that he expected to be with the Baltimore club when it flies to California Wednesday to open a road trip in Oakland.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 27, 1992
If it is true, as reported, that a Mr. Bill DeWitt Jr. of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Arlington, Texas, is about to purchase the baseball team of Baltimore, he should enter city limits with this understanding: Nobody around here, excepting Mr. Eli Jacobs, particularly welcomes the sight of him.That DeWitt, a Cincinnati oil executive and minor partner in the Texas Rangers baseball team, is apparently about to buy the Orioles, helps expose one more time that most...
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Mr. Hyman is a sportswriter for The Sun | November 17, 1991
THE MAN TO SEE:EDWARD BENNETT WILLIAMS,ULTIMATE INSIDER,LEGENDARY TRIAL LAWYER.Evan Thomas.Simon & Schuster.587 pages. $27.50.Edward Bennett Williams owned the Baltimore Orioles from 1979 until his death from cancer in August 1988. During that time, the hometown team won a world's championship, changed managers four times, sent a Hall of Famer into reluctant retirement and captured the national spotlight with a 21-game losing streak.For the writers who covered the Orioles during the 1980s, however, the games rarely were the most compelling part of the job.Generally, that was the volatile gentleman in the blue, shapeless suit -- Williams, of course.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Roch Kubatko and Kent Baker and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
Former Orioles yesterday painted a portrait of Jerry Hoffberger as a compassionate and caring man who impressed them as a friend who thoroughly enjoyed his ownership of the club. Hoffberger, who led the Orioles to their greatest heights during a 14-year stewardship from 1965 to '79, died Friday night at age 80. "He truly cared about the players," said former catcher Andy Etchebarren, now the manager of the Single-A Frederick Keys. "He'd come in and ask about you, whether you had any problems with the family or kids that he could help you with.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 27, 1992
If it is true, as reported, that a Mr. Bill DeWitt Jr. of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Arlington, Texas, is about to purchase the baseball team of Baltimore, he should enter city limits with this understanding: Nobody around here, excepting Mr. Eli Jacobs, particularly welcomes the sight of him.That DeWitt, a Cincinnati oil executive and minor partner in the Texas Rangers baseball team, is apparently about to buy the Orioles, helps expose one more time that most...
NEWS
March 29, 1992
Edward Bennett Williams was a Washingtonian. That fact hovered darkly over Orioles fans.For the years Williams owned the team, Baltimoreans worried that their ballclub was in the hands of an out-of-towner, a man who could choose at any moment to move the Orioles down the parkway to D.C.To be sure, Williams -- tough, gruff, a superstar lawyer and Washington power broker -- never actually threatened to take the club from Baltimore. He didn't have to. The thought lingered, unspoken. Even as fans set attendance records at Memorial Stadium, Williams complained that the ballpark was inadequate, unprofitable and badly located.
FEATURES
By Evan Thomas | December 8, 1991
Edward Bennett Williams's greatest sporting ambition was to own a major league baseball team. The boy who had sold "ice colds and red hots" for the minor league Hartford Senators wanted to own the big league Washington Senators. He had bought into the football Redskins only after he failed to win a baseball franchise in Washington in 1961. In 1972, he had tried again to get a team in Washington but failed in an attempt to move the San Diego Padres. Undaunted, he kept searching for weak franchises that might want to move to the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | November 25, 1991
THE MAN TO SEE. Edward Bennett Williams: Ultimate Insider, Legendary Trial Lawyer. By Evan Thomas. Simon & Schuster. 587 pages. $27.50.FOR THOSE naive citizens who live outside the Capital Beltway, this excellent work is as much a revelation of how the Washington power structure works as it is a biography of one of the century's greatest defense lawyers. Edward Bennett Williams was indeed powerful and, relatively, his only real failure came when he ventured afield to buy the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Mr. Hyman is a sportswriter for The Sun | November 17, 1991
THE MAN TO SEE:EDWARD BENNETT WILLIAMS,ULTIMATE INSIDER,LEGENDARY TRIAL LAWYER.Evan Thomas.Simon & Schuster.587 pages. $27.50.Edward Bennett Williams owned the Baltimore Orioles from 1979 until his death from cancer in August 1988. During that time, the hometown team won a world's championship, changed managers four times, sent a Hall of Famer into reluctant retirement and captured the national spotlight with a 21-game losing streak.For the writers who covered the Orioles during the 1980s, however, the games rarely were the most compelling part of the job.Generally, that was the volatile gentleman in the blue, shapeless suit -- Williams, of course.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | May 3, 1991
Let's say the Orioles don't recover. Let's say they're buried by the All-Star break. And let's say owner Eli Jacobs' fancy Washington friends grow tired of coming to Memorial Stadium to watch a losing team.That's your basic fire-the-manager scenario, but hold on. Frank Robinson is more entrenched in his club's hierarchy than any of his colleagues. In fact, his contract is so unusual, it complicates matters considerably.Robinson, 55, is guaranteed a front-office position for at least one year after he departs as manager, regardless of whether he quits or gets fired.
NEWS
By Kurt Rheinheimer | March 31, 2002
ROANOKE, Va. - I was eight when the Orioles came to town, and it was the best thing that ever happened to me. People told me I was a precocious third-grader, reading the paper every day, listening to the radio for hours at a time. I was not, of course. I was simply one fan among a million others, so proud to be a part of the crowd at Memorial Stadium, of the reborn pair of beautiful big-league words that now defined my hometown: Baltimore Orioles. And yes, nearly everything in the world has changed since 1954.
SPORTS
August 8, 1991
Baltimore's constant fear of losing the Orioles has brought a couple more prospective buyers to light, according to The Sun.Appliance store giant Jack Luskin and his nephew, attorney Steven L. Miles, yesterday said they have made some early forays into purchasing the team from Eli Jacobs.Jacobs indicated in June he may be ready to sell the club. The first Baltimorean to say he would be interested in buying was Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, the chairman of Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc., which operates a chain of clothing stores.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | July 8, 1991
Proof of the Orioles' pitching woes is that they were the las club in the majors to produce a five-game winner. They barely made it by the All-Star break when Jeff Ballard won No. 5 (against nine losses) yesterday in the 5-3 win over the New York Yankees.The next-to-last team to have a pitcher reach that plateau was Cleveland, which has the worst record in the big leagues (26-53). The Indians' Greg Swindell beat Milwaukee Saturday to go 5-7.* Orioles pitcher Dave Johnson, apparently over the groin injury that put him on the disabled list May 19, told visitors to Hagerstown Friday night that he expected to be with the Baltimore club when it flies to California Wednesday to open a road trip in Oakland.
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