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Edward Albee

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By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 13, 2002
In 1994, when Three Tall Women won Edward Albee his third Pulitzer Prize, it was hailed as the return of a playwright whose work had become relatively inaccessible to mainstream audiences. Based on his adoptive mother, Three Tall Women focuses on a domineering 92-year-old dowager, her 52-year-old caretaker and a young lawyer. But when an unexpected connection is revealed among these three women, Albee's play turns out to be far less conventional than it first appears. Center Stage's production, which opens Wednesday, will be the first Albee play the theater has produced since 1974's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
Human relations seemed so straightforward and basically workable before Edward Albee started looking into them. In 1961, the playwright dug so deeply beneath the skin to expose gnawing marital complexities in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" that audiences felt as naked and wounded as the characters by the end. Four decades later, Albee peeled away still more layers and, if anything, revealed even more uncomfortable relationships in "The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?" It wouldn't be surprising to see people with dazed looks stumbling out of Howard Community College's Studio Theatre after performances of Rep Stage's first-rate production of the Tony Award-winning "The Goat."
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NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 14, 2007
Four decades after its premiere, Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? has lost none of its sting. That's demonstrated with piercing precision in the production launching its national tour at Washington's Kennedy Center. On the surface, "precision" may seem the wrong word for what goes on in this play - a dark-night-of-the-soul account of a middle-aged professor and his wife who "entertain" a young couple by subjecting them, along with themselves, to a series of lacerating mind games: "Humiliate the Host," "Get the Guests," etc. WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF -- Through Jan. 28 at the Kennedy Center, Washington.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2009
Bay Theatre begins its eighth season with A. R. Gurney's 1995 comedy "Sylvia," about a middle-age man who brings home a stray dog to the empty nest he shares with his wife on Manhattan's Upper West Side. If instead of a year earlier, last season had closed with Edward Albee's 2002 play "The Goat or Who Is Sylvia?" about another middle-age male in crisis who found an animal irresistible, Bay would have had an amazing segue between seasons. Noting the similarity of themes, playwright Gurney explains on his Web site, "Greg's affection for Sylvia costs him his job and almost his marriage.
NEWS
By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | October 29, 1995
In his plays, Edward Albee exposes the dark underside of the dysfunctional American family, but the man himself is actually an amiable, unthreatening sort, whose tweed coat and practical shoes give him the appearance of a biology professor on some sleepy New England campus. There's little reason to be afraid of Edward Albee: In fact, he can be a charming and engaging luncheon companion -- if you know the rules.First, don't presume, like all those pesky critics, that his characters embody his personal values and views.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | October 16, 2003
The man in the audience wearing the blue sweater had had enough. He had forked over $25 to hear Edward Albee talk - or, some might say, refuse to talk - at the University of Maryland, College Park, and he did not attempt to hide his irritation when he finally got a chance to pose a question to the playwright. "At what part of your life," the man asked, "did you realize you had become a curmudgeon?" Albee responded cheerfully: "Would you define `curmudgeon' for me?" Since his interrogator was aware that Albee, possibly America's greatest living playwright, had come across the c-word before, he withdrew his question.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 21, 1995
Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., opens its season with the Baltimore premiere of Edward Albee's 1971 play, "All Over." Set in the home of a dying man, the play would appear to have some parallels with Albee's 1994 Pulitzer Prize winner, "Three Tall Women," coming to the Mechanic Theatre in February. "All Over" will be directed by Steve Goldklang, who also directed Fell's Point Corner's productions of Albee's "Tiny Alice" and "A Delicate Balance."Show times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays (no performance Oct. 1)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 21, 2002
Everyman Theatre will make its first foray into the work of Edward Albee when A Delicate Balance opens a month-long run tonight. Albee won the first of his three Pulitzer Prizes for this 1966 drama about a family dealing with what director Vincent Lancisi describes as the timely subjects of "terror" and "unpleasant truths." Anne Stone and Bill Hamlin play Agnes and Tobias, the suburban husband and wife whose home life is upset by the unexpected arrival of their frightened best friends, portrayed by Richard Pilcher and Judy Simmons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
"Edward Albee: A Singular Life," by Mel Gussow. Simon & Schuster. 432 pages. $30.Most biographers could not ask for a more challenging subject than Edward Albee, who throughout his career has remained masterfully circumspect about his private life, even while mining it for his most famous plays.Mel Gussow is equal to the task, and brings extraordinary rectitude and insight to the project of synthesizing Albee's life and work. "Edward Albee: A Singular Life" is a thoroughly absorbing book that functions not only as a biography, but as criticism, social history and psychological allegory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 8, 1994
It's unusual for a playwright to write an adaptation of a contemporary play by another playwright, particularly when the adaptation and the original are in the same language. But that's what Edward Albee did in 1967 when he reworked -- and retained the title of -- British writer Giles Cooper's suburban satire, "Everything in the Garden."Although Albee's latest play, "Three Tall Women," has received a better reception in New York than anything else he has done in years, his adaptations have never been considered his best work -- even at his peak of popularity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
Think of 2008 as the new New Frontier. The calendar might indicate that we're in the 21st century. But in merchandise display windows, on stage and on the large and small screen - and yes, even in politics - America seemingly is returning to the early, buttoned-down 1960s. Not long ago, society was enamored of the Greatest Generation. As the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor passed, we were bombarded with television specials, movies and fashion trends all inspired by the so-called "Last Good War."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 14, 2007
Bay Theatre will offer a balanced, four-play season that deals with difficult family relationships while reflecting the wide range of material that attracts co-founders Lucinda Merry-Browne and Janet Luby. In its sixth season, the professional, not-for-profit theater has become an equity theater, which requires half of the actors to be members of the Actors' Equity Association union. "We had no choice if we didn't want to go backward," Luby said. "We'll still use local actors because we have great talent here.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | January 14, 2007
Four decades after its premiere, Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? has lost none of its sting. That's demonstrated with piercing precision in the production launching its national tour at Washington's Kennedy Center. On the surface, "precision" may seem the wrong word for what goes on in this play - a dark-night-of-the-soul account of a middle-aged professor and his wife who "entertain" a young couple by subjecting them, along with themselves, to a series of lacerating mind games: "Humiliate the Host," "Get the Guests," etc. WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF -- Through Jan. 28 at the Kennedy Center, Washington.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | October 16, 2003
The man in the audience wearing the blue sweater had had enough. He had forked over $25 to hear Edward Albee talk - or, some might say, refuse to talk - at the University of Maryland, College Park, and he did not attempt to hide his irritation when he finally got a chance to pose a question to the playwright. "At what part of your life," the man asked, "did you realize you had become a curmudgeon?" Albee responded cheerfully: "Would you define `curmudgeon' for me?" Since his interrogator was aware that Albee, possibly America's greatest living playwright, had come across the c-word before, he withdrew his question.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 21, 2002
Everyman Theatre will make its first foray into the work of Edward Albee when A Delicate Balance opens a month-long run tonight. Albee won the first of his three Pulitzer Prizes for this 1966 drama about a family dealing with what director Vincent Lancisi describes as the timely subjects of "terror" and "unpleasant truths." Anne Stone and Bill Hamlin play Agnes and Tobias, the suburban husband and wife whose home life is upset by the unexpected arrival of their frightened best friends, portrayed by Richard Pilcher and Judy Simmons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 12, 2002
The new theater season marks milestone anniversaries for two Baltimore theaters. Center Stage turns 40, and Arena Players, billed as "the nation's oldest continuously operating African-American theater," turns 50. The fare at both is eclectic, and, indeed, variety is a keynote at most of the area's theaters for 2002-2003. At Center Stage, variety comes in the form of a blend of old and new, starting with the season opener - artistic director Irene Lewis' new take on J.M. Barrie's classic, Peter Pan, starring Jefferson Mays as the boy who refuses to grow up. Other highlights include the theater's first-ever co-production with Washington's Arena Stage, a revival of the Fats Waller revue Ain't Misbehavin' and two premieres that originated as Center Stage commissions, Warren Leight's No Foreigners Beyond This Point and Lynn Nottage's Intimate Apparel.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2009
Bay Theatre begins its eighth season with A. R. Gurney's 1995 comedy "Sylvia," about a middle-age man who brings home a stray dog to the empty nest he shares with his wife on Manhattan's Upper West Side. If instead of a year earlier, last season had closed with Edward Albee's 2002 play "The Goat or Who Is Sylvia?" about another middle-age male in crisis who found an animal irresistible, Bay would have had an amazing segue between seasons. Noting the similarity of themes, playwright Gurney explains on his Web site, "Greg's affection for Sylvia costs him his job and almost his marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 13, 2002
In 1994, when Three Tall Women won Edward Albee his third Pulitzer Prize, it was hailed as the return of a playwright whose work had become relatively inaccessible to mainstream audiences. Based on his adoptive mother, Three Tall Women focuses on a domineering 92-year-old dowager, her 52-year-old caretaker and a young lawyer. But when an unexpected connection is revealed among these three women, Albee's play turns out to be far less conventional than it first appears. Center Stage's production, which opens Wednesday, will be the first Albee play the theater has produced since 1974's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
ENTERTAINMENT
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
"Edward Albee: A Singular Life," by Mel Gussow. Simon & Schuster. 432 pages. $30.Most biographers could not ask for a more challenging subject than Edward Albee, who throughout his career has remained masterfully circumspect about his private life, even while mining it for his most famous plays.Mel Gussow is equal to the task, and brings extraordinary rectitude and insight to the project of synthesizing Albee's life and work. "Edward Albee: A Singular Life" is a thoroughly absorbing book that functions not only as a biography, but as criticism, social history and psychological allegory.
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