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NEWS
March 7, 2010
Sponsored by the Learn to Live program of the Anne Arundel County Department of Health, educators will answer questions on nutrition and distribute free low-fat recipes at the following supermarkets: •Lauer's Supermarket, 8479 Fort Smallwood Road, Pasadena: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday. •Graul's, 1388 Cape St. Claire Road, Annapolis: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 14. •Graul's, 607 Taylor Ave., Annapolis: noon to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. March 26, 10 a.m to 3 p.m. March 27 and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 28.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Patricia Rice Doran | October 9, 2014
The mother's story was one that I have heard many times over the past few months, with some variation in detail. Her child, an A and B student with many friends and outside interests, had awoken one morning and refused to go to school. In the following weeks, he developed elaborate rituals that consumed his time, paralyzing fears that made it difficult to function in school or out of it, and intense and frequent rages. His teachers quickly ran out of ideas and strategies, and the student found himself failing five out of six classes.
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NEWS
August 30, 2012
Liz Bowie usually provides balanced and informative coverage of education issues, but she presented an absurdly rosy perspective on the national Common Core standards for K-12 English and math that start kicking in this fall ("Schools hear call for more 'rigor,'" Aug. 27). To say that a "near-national consensus" has formed in support of these one-size-fits-all curricular guidelines ignores the fact that many state legislatures adopted the Common Core in an unseemly rush to qualify for federal Race to the Top largesse, without public hearings or school board votes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Joel G. Hill, who had taught at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and was active in Episcopal affairs, died Sept. 18 at her Westminster, Vt., home of cancer. The former Hagerstown resident was 78. The daughter of Van Amburgh Goodrich and Francis Arnold Goodrich, the former Joel Ann Goodrich was born in Kansas City, Mo., and was raised in Del Mar, Calif. She was a graduate of the Bishop's School in La Jolla, Calif., and earned a bachelor's degree in literature in 1974 from the University of Michigan.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 2, 2013
Two Maryland educators have been chosen to take part in a prestigious, national fellowship program focused on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. Green Street Academy teacher Desmond Rowe will be among 40 educators from across the nation heading to the Siemens Teachers as Researchers fellowship program in July, according to a release from the corporation. Amanda Peretich, a teacher from Calvert High School in Prince Frederick, was also awarded the fellowship this year.  According to Siements, "the program is designed to empower teachers to bring the excitement of authentic research into their classrooms and inspire students to pursue [STEM]
EXPLORE
July 25, 2011
The Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association-Aberdeen, Maryland Chapter, has announced it has made its first monetary award for their new STEM Initiative. Aberdeen's initiative is a twist on the traditional acronym for STEM. STEM stands for Scholarships, Tools, Equipment, and Mentors. The grants are open to Harford County Public School educators and staff working directly in a STEM Education. Awards can be used for HCPS educators to pursue continuing education in their STEM field, for tools students can use in the classroom, or for equipment needed to help enhance the education of STEM courses for students.
NEWS
December 21, 2008
Board certifies 36 county educators The National Board of Professional Teaching Standards has certified 36 Anne Arundel County Public Schools educators, giving them the highest teaching credential in the nation. Educators must complete a rigorous professional development assessment to achieve certification. With these 36 newly certified teachers, the county now has 160 certified educators, or 3.2 percent of its teaching staff, the highest in the state. michaelm_aacps@hotmail.com. Information: 410-643-5666.
EXPLORE
January 17, 2013
Twenty-two outstanding educators from area schools were honored at a dinner Jan. 10 by the Chesapeake Gateway Chamber of Commerce, which honors teachers as part of their annual awards and installation dinner,. Superintendent of Baltimore County Public Schools Dallas Dance was on hand to honor the Baltimore County Public School educators Teachers from Carney Elementary, to Kenwood High School, to the Community College of Baltimore County were selected on the basis of having five or more years of service in education, classroom leadership, involvement in extra-curricular activities, respect from colleagues and service as positive role model for students.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | December 18, 2012
It's easy to get lost in the back and forth about education policy decisions in Harford County, or anywhere else for that matter, and focus on problems like portable classrooms, security issues, teacher retirement plan funding and the like. A danger when this happens is the focus is lost on what's right with our public school system, and there's plenty that's right. Maryland has one of the highest-ranked public school systems in the country, and Harford County's public schools have been among the top tier in the state.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Across Maryland, the palms get sweaty. Only a few weeks to go! A few weeks until the next round of tests known by thousands of educators and parents from Oakland to Pocomoke City as "Mizpap."Mizpap is a rough acronym for the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP), the linchpin of which is the battery of "higher-order thinking skills" tests to be administered to the third, fifth and eighth grades in mid-May.Never has a single group of tests produced so much perspiration in Maryland education circles.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
On an unseasonably warm opening weekend, several visitors exited the 7-acre corn maze at Sharp's at Waterford Farm huffing and puffing, and a tad overheated. The 8-foot-tall withered cornstalks that wall in the maze's twisting pathway were the likely culprit, blocking breezes that could have offset the afternoon sun, surmised farm manager Cheryl Nodar. "The people who walk through on our first weekend are always the guinea pigs," she said. "I ask them how it went to be sure it's a good experience, and we're getting great feedback so far. " The corn maze, which debuted in 2002, is an agritourism feature that has helped attract thousands of visitors over the years to the working Glenwood farm, which dates to 1903.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Kathleen M. Happ, a retired Anne Arundel Community College educator who ws an active member of Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church on Bolton Hill, died Sept. 19 of lung cancer at Villages Hospice in The Villages, Fla. A former resident of the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood, Ms. Happ was 69. "Kathy was a truly remarkable and exceedingly talented professional. She had integrity, was always positive and a professional in her field," said Martha A. "Marty" Smith, who headed the college from 1994 until 2012, when she retired.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
While I was completing my undergraduate degree at Johns Hopkins University in the mid-1970s, I took several sociology and psychology classes including one on psychotropic drugs. I was surprised to find Baltimore police officers in my classes. I was glad to see them, but their naïveté and seeming lack of common sense based on their comments and questions in class led me to hope that by the end of their education they would have a better understanding of the need for compassion in their dealings with city residents ( "Require college degrees for police," Sept.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
One of the world's most diverse and intriguing foods, the oyster is heavily influenced in its development and flavor by where it is grown. As the location of a vineyard can change the taste and texture of a grape -- a concept known as terroir -- oyster flavor is driven by merroir, the content and characteristics of the sea in which it grows. Experimenting with different types of oysters is delicious, fun and enlightening -- especially when you do some research before diving into that dozen.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Over and again, Freeman A. Hrabowski called Howard County's African-American community fortunate to be living in "the richest county in the richest state in the richest country in the world. " Speaking at a "parent empowerment and engagement forum" in Columbia this week, the president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County then implored African-American parents to seize opportunities and resources within the county to help their children succeed. "A lot of people would like to live in Howard County," Hrabowski said.
NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | September 30, 2014
Following the urban unrest in the 1960s, there was a move toward requiring college degrees for police officers. That movement never gained serious momentum across the nation. Today only a few of the police departments across the country require applicants to possess a college degree, and concerns are still being raised as to whether today's police officers are best prepared to deal with the myriad of situations presented in modern policing. Indeed there are serious questions as to whether a modern democracy can survive without better prepared law enforcement officials able to handle the stresses of the job without overreacting.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2001
AMY COLMAN, the gifted and talented program teacher at Elkridge Elementary School, wants people to know that Delta Kappa Gamma is not a secret society. It's an international organization of outstanding female educators. To join, a woman must be an educator for five years and must be nominated by other members of the chapter. In Howard County, the chapter - called Alpha Gamma - has about 40 members, including principals, administrators, reading specialists, counselors and retirees, Colman said.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 28, 2014
This is a tale of two countries. The first country was built on a radical new promise of human equality and a guarantee of the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. That country made it possible for even those born in the humblest and most meager circumstances to climb to the pinnacle of prosperity and achievement. It helped save the world in a great global conflagration, fed and rebuilt the devastated nations of Europe, planted the first footprints on another world.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 28, 2014
This weekend over 700 people were scheduled to attend our 6th annual Archdiocese of Baltimore Gala to raise money for students who otherwise could not afford to attend a Catholic school in the Archdiocese. Since its inception, the gala has raised more than $4.2 million in tuition assistance and endowment for Catholic schools. The gala is just one way the archdiocese is helping children from low-income families benefit from a Catholic school education. Another is the Partners in Excellence (PIE)
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