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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 1997
Over the past decade, the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, N.J., has transformed itself from a small nonprofit educational institution into the world's largest testing company, administering 9 million yearly examinations that help determine the future of millions of people trying to get into good schools or professions.It has quietly grown into a multinational operation, complete with for-profit subsidiaries, a reserve fund of $91 million and revenue last year of $411 million.As it celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, ETS has come under fire not only for its failure to address increased incidents of cheating and fraud, but also for what its critics say is its transformation into a highly competitive business operation.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Under a new federal accountability system, Maryland is no longer in compliance with the rules governing special-education students because the state's schools exempt a high percentage of students from national testing. The announcement this week by federal education officials means Maryland will have to pressure local school systems to include more students in the National Assessment of Educational Testing, a national test in math and reading that is given every two years. Thirty other states and the District of Columbia were also found out of compliance for a variety of reasons.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Thomson Prometric, a Baltimore computer testing company, has landed a $1 billion contract with the New Jersey company that administers the SAT and Advanced Placement exams. Prometric, a division of the Canadian electronic media conglomerate Thomson Corp., will get more than $83 million a year for the next 12 years from Educational Testing Services of Princeton, N.J., the companies announced yesterday. Under the deal, Prometric will help Educational Testing Services introduce a version of the Test of English as a Foreign Language next year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
Carl S. Hyman, an executive of a firm that tests students and assesses their achievement both in the U.S. and overseas who was also a Tuscany-Canterbury neighborhood activist, died of lung cancer Sept. 5 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 57. Born in Baltimore and raised on Taney Road in Cheswolde, he was a 1973 Polytechnic Institute graduate. His father, David Hyman, was an architect, civil engineer and Johns Hopkins University professor who specialized in Mesoamerican archaeology.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1994
Jacqueline Callier wanted to ace the Scholastic Assessment Test today, but miserable weather has put the exam on ice for her and hundreds of other students in the Baltimore area.It is the second SAT postponement for Jacqueline in three weeks. The college entrance test also was snowed out Jan. 22.The Educational Testing Service, the Princeton, N.J. company that administers the exam, was itself closed by the weather yesterday. Individual schools decide whether to offer the test. Students scheduled to take the SAT today were advised to listen to the radio to see if their test center would be open or if makeup dates had been set.For weeks, Jacqueline, a Centennial High School junior, has prepared an hour a day -- two hours a day on weekends -- for the test that many colleges require for admission.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
The state school board has approved a new exam and qualifying score for elementary teachers to qualify for an exemption from Maryland's tougher reading course requirements. But passing the test will be far from easy, even for experienced teachers. The qualifying score set by the school board last week means that only 29 percent of the first 250 teachers to take the exam earned passing marks. The decision by the state board allows elementary school teachers who are renewing their teaching certification to take an exam developed by the Educational Testing Service, rather than enroll in additional courses in reading instruction.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | July 3, 2007
Thomson Prometric, the Baltimore-based educational testing company that was once part of the former Sylvan Learning Systems, has been sold again - this time to Educational Testing Service, administrator of the SAT, for $435 million. ETS is Prometric's largest customer, a partnership that began nearly 20 years ago, ETS officials said yesterday. Prometric delivers the TOEFL, GRE and Praxis teaching licensing exams for the Princeton, N.J.-based educational assessment and research company.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | August 3, 1992
Three years ago, a shudder went through the hearts of female students and their tuition-paying parents when research by a women's advocacy group concluded that the Educational Testing Service's Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT, is biased against girls and women.Each year, more than 1.7 million students who want to go to college, many of them seeking scholarships, plunk down $17 to take the test. Fifty-two percent are female.A riveting study of SAT scores for verbal and mathematical skills in 1989 by Phyllis F. Rosser, director of the Equality and Testing Project in Holmdel, N.J., showed that the gap between SAT scores of females and males was 57 points, with girls averaging 878 points out of a possible 1,600 and boys averaging 935."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1996
Allan C. Stevens, a South Carroll High School junior known for his skill on the tennis court, learned last week that he aced a different sort of match: the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT).The 17-year-old Sykesville resident earned a perfect score -- 1,600 -- on the SAT, the test most colleges use as a guideline for admissions. The news arrived in the mail Monday."Everyone got results this week, and the test was a popular topic at school," Allan said. "I wanted to tell my scores, but I wasn't eager.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 26, 1994
CHICAGO -- This is usually a high-anxiety season for college seniors, what with deadlines looming for getting applications to graduate school in order.But this Christmas break, many students left campus with a double dose of jitters, trapped in the middle of a multiple-choice espionage drama.Two years ago, the Graduate Record Examination, which is generally required of candidates for graduate programs, entered the electronic age.Instead of using the traditional pencil-and-paper format, students were able to take the GRE by computer, an innovation touted as being more accurate and less vulnerable to cheaters.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | July 3, 2007
Thomson Prometric, the Baltimore-based educational testing company that was once part of the former Sylvan Learning Systems, has been sold again - this time to Educational Testing Service, administrator of the SAT, for $435 million. ETS is Prometric's largest customer, a partnership that began nearly 20 years ago, ETS officials said yesterday. Prometric delivers the TOEFL, GRE and Praxis teaching licensing exams for the Princeton, N.J.-based educational assessment and research company.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
As any educator knows, cheating is as old as testing. So news that three students at Severna Park High School may have cheated on an Advanced Placement test is not surprising. But it's certainly disturbing. The Educational Testing Service, which administered the exam on behalf of the College Board, has rightly canceled the scores for more than 40 students in one testing room after finding that a proctor didn't do his job. Anne Arundel County school officials made the correct decision to keep those students from retaking the test tomorrow.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
The State Department of Education has granted appeals to six Anne Arundel County schools where special-education students did not meet state standards on the Maryland School Assessment last year. The successful appeals mean that the schools are now considered to have made "adequate yearly progress" under the guidelines of the federal No Child Left Behind act. If schools fail to make such progress, they can be designated as needing improvement and could face restructuring if they fail to meet state standards for several years in a row. North County High School, however, was denied its appeal for special-education students who did not meet standards on the state's geometry test, meaning that it will remain in the category of schools in need of improvement.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | November 4, 2005
Testing company Thomson Prometric plans to move its Baltimore headquarters and 400 employees next year to one of the city's newest developments on its eastern fringe, the company will announce today. The subsidiary of The Thomson Corp., an information technology company based in Stamford, Conn., will move next November from Harbor East to the new 17-story tower at Canton Crossing in Canton. Prometric, which was owned by Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. from 1997 to 2000, has been based at 1000 Lancaster St. at Harbor East since 1996, when the building opened.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2005
Taking advantage of recently relaxed rules, several area districts have persuaded the state to remove schools from a list of those that had failed to demonstrate "adequate yearly" academic progress under the federal No Child Left Behind law. The results of the appeals - based on a change in how children with learning disabilities are treated under the state's accountability program - came as a relief to school systems. Remaining on the list could subject the schools to an escalating list of sanctions that includes, ultimately, a state takeover.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | January 22, 2005
MONDAY, the Educational Testing Service - the folks who brought us the SAT - will begin offering a new test for rising college juniors on "information and communication technology," another big step in digital fluency becoming a fourth literacy in addition to the good old 3 R's. Schools as renowned as UCLA may use it for entry to higher-level courses, community colleges to certify their graduates, and employers for hiring. All of which prompts several reactions - hyper-linked, shall we say, at Internet speed: Western civilization is over: Whatever happened to the literacy test of diagramming sentences?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | October 24, 1999
"The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy," by Nicholas Lemann. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 368 pages. $27.Nicholas Lemann started out thinking he would probably write a history of the Educational Testing Service, the organization that markets the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) to prospective university students. Somehow, he persuaded the management at the secretive organization to open its archives to him. What he found turned out to be fascinating.But alert readers will note that the title of Lemann's new book says nothing specifically about the Educational Testing Service, and fails to mention the SAT by name.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
As any educator knows, cheating is as old as testing. So news that three students at Severna Park High School may have cheated on an Advanced Placement test is not surprising. But it's certainly disturbing. The Educational Testing Service, which administered the exam on behalf of the College Board, has rightly canceled the scores for more than 40 students in one testing room after finding that a proctor didn't do his job. Anne Arundel County school officials made the correct decision to keep those students from retaking the test tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Thomson Prometric, a Baltimore computer testing company, has landed a $1 billion contract with the New Jersey company that administers the SAT and Advanced Placement exams. Prometric, a division of the Canadian electronic media conglomerate Thomson Corp., will get more than $83 million a year for the next 12 years from Educational Testing Services of Princeton, N.J., the companies announced yesterday. Under the deal, Prometric will help Educational Testing Services introduce a version of the Test of English as a Foreign Language next year.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
The state school board has approved a new exam and qualifying score for elementary teachers to qualify for an exemption from Maryland's tougher reading course requirements. But passing the test will be far from easy, even for experienced teachers. The qualifying score set by the school board last week means that only 29 percent of the first 250 teachers to take the exam earned passing marks. The decision by the state board allows elementary school teachers who are renewing their teaching certification to take an exam developed by the Educational Testing Service, rather than enroll in additional courses in reading instruction.
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