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Educational Television

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NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 19, 1996
It's between an incumbent who dyes his hair gray to look mature and a challenger who dyes his black to look spry.Scientists speculate that life may have existed on Earth, but died out eons ago.Broadcasters promise to provide a little educational television, which children do not promise to watch.Chessie the Manatee has been spotted in the Patapsco, Prettyboy and Loch Ness.Pub Date: 8/19/96
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NEWS
By Susan Brink and Susan Brink,Los Angeles Times | November 17, 2006
Americans more than believe the health information they get from fictional television shows. Spurred by what they see on shows such as ER and The Bold and the Beautiful, they take action. They go to the doctor, surveys suggest. They tell a friend to have that cough checked. They ask a lover to use a condom. Fans develop trusting relationships with the characters who come into their homes each week, and industry insiders say they can't betray that trust. "I'm aware of the number of people who are paying attention to the facts around the fiction," says Jan Nash, executive producer of Without a Trace.
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NEWS
By Beth Frerking | August 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Viewing quality educational television from a very young age has "surprisingly strong and positive effects on children," both in their readiness to learn and in academic performance later on, according to new research.The findings challenge conventional wisdom, which contends that if TV doesn't harm children, it certainly doesn't help them. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics announced this past week that children under 2 should not be allowed to watch television at all.But John C. Wright, who directs the Center for Research on the Influences of Television on Children at the University of Texas at Austin, asserts that by being extremely cautious consumers and program reviewers, parents can ensure that electronic media actually benefit their children.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
The Baltimore company known for its Sylvan tutoring centers is expanding into educational television with an agreement to co-produce the well-known Public Broadcasting Service children's series Reading Rainbow under a deal announced yesterday. It's not an entirely odd partnership for Educate Inc., which has been repositioning its business around consumer services in the past year. Besides its tutoring business and last year's acquisition of the Hooked on Phonics brand, the company said it wants to expand into broadcast media.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
Lenora Heilig Nast, an artist and writer who was co-editor of a book that examined Baltimore's renaissance, died Saturday of brain cancer at Sinai Hospital. The Randallstown resident was 77. Mrs. Nast, Laurence Krause and Richard C. Monk were co-editors of "Baltimore, A Living Renaissance," an illustrated book that was published in 1982 by the Historic Baltimore Society Inc. Through the eyes of 74 authors -- journalists, historians, educators, planners and other professionals -- the book examined the city's renaissance from the conception of Charles Center in 1956 to the opening of Harborplace in 1980.
NEWS
By Linda Valdez | August 5, 1996
BILL CLINTON crows about a pitifully dim sunrise.Meanwhile, Bob Dole's presidential campaign office says what Bill did was just an "imitation of Bob Dole's real leadership in LTC confronting the excesses of the entertainment industry."Clinton's big accomplishment? He got TV broadcasters to agree to offer three hours a week of educational children's programs. It is precious little and six years late.The Children's Television Act of 1990 required local stations to increase educational programs for children.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Reversing a historic trend, the nation's broadcasters consented yesterday to provide at least three hours of children's educational programming a week -- or risk losing their licenses.The agreement, brokered by the White House over the weekend, was announced by President Clinton as he kicked off a three-hour conference on children's television in the East Room.Noting that a typical American pre-schooler watches 28 hours of TV a week, Clinton said:"I cannot imagine anything that serves the public interest more than seeing to it that we give our children at least three hours of educational television a week."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
It's been more than 30 years since Julia Child first stepped onto a television set with a whisk, a copper bowl and some eggs and taught the world -- at least that part of the world that watched "educational" television -- to make an omelet.The world has changed since then, and television, public and commercial, has also changed. But Ms. Child is very much the same person that generations have known and loved and learned from. As she launches her third television series this season, "Cooking with Master Chefs," she remains a tall, distinguished woman, articulate in her distinctive voice, and still passionate about good food and good living.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh | June 7, 1991
Baltimore will join the handful of large public school systems using Channel One, a controversial educational television program that brings a 12-minute newscast, complete with commercials, into public schools.After brief discussion, the city school board voted last night to allow Channel One at all middle and senior high schools in Baltimore. The company that sells Channel One, Whittle Educational Network, provides video equipment and the newscasts free of charge.Some schools will be on line as early as September.
NEWS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service Cox News Service contributed to this article | March 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators are putting television stations on notice: Contrary to the past practice of many broadcasters, cartoons like "The Jetsons" and "The Flintstones" can no longer count as "educational and informational" programming.The announcement, issued Tuesday by the Federal Communications Commission, may not come as news to parents, whose households are in undated with cartoon turtles, rabbits and robots.But it could prove upsetting to broadcasters, who are required by a law enacted in 1990 to demonstrate their commitment to TC the educational needs of children as a condition of renewing their lucrative licenses every five years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
Lenora Heilig Nast, an artist and writer who was co-editor of a book that examined Baltimore's renaissance, died Saturday of brain cancer at Sinai Hospital. The Randallstown resident was 77. Mrs. Nast, Laurence Krause and Richard C. Monk were co-editors of "Baltimore, A Living Renaissance," an illustrated book that was published in 1982 by the Historic Baltimore Society Inc. Through the eyes of 74 authors -- journalists, historians, educators, planners and other professionals -- the book examined the city's renaissance from the conception of Charles Center in 1956 to the opening of Harborplace in 1980.
NEWS
By Beth Frerking | August 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Viewing quality educational television from a very young age has "surprisingly strong and positive effects on children," both in their readiness to learn and in academic performance later on, according to new research.The findings challenge conventional wisdom, which contends that if TV doesn't harm children, it certainly doesn't help them. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics announced this past week that children under 2 should not be allowed to watch television at all.But John C. Wright, who directs the Center for Research on the Influences of Television on Children at the University of Texas at Austin, asserts that by being extremely cautious consumers and program reviewers, parents can ensure that electronic media actually benefit their children.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 19, 1996
It's between an incumbent who dyes his hair gray to look mature and a challenger who dyes his black to look spry.Scientists speculate that life may have existed on Earth, but died out eons ago.Broadcasters promise to provide a little educational television, which children do not promise to watch.Chessie the Manatee has been spotted in the Patapsco, Prettyboy and Loch Ness.Pub Date: 8/19/96
NEWS
By Linda Valdez | August 5, 1996
BILL CLINTON crows about a pitifully dim sunrise.Meanwhile, Bob Dole's presidential campaign office says what Bill did was just an "imitation of Bob Dole's real leadership in LTC confronting the excesses of the entertainment industry."Clinton's big accomplishment? He got TV broadcasters to agree to offer three hours a week of educational children's programs. It is precious little and six years late.The Children's Television Act of 1990 required local stations to increase educational programs for children.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Reversing a historic trend, the nation's broadcasters consented yesterday to provide at least three hours of children's educational programming a week -- or risk losing their licenses.The agreement, brokered by the White House over the weekend, was announced by President Clinton as he kicked off a three-hour conference on children's television in the East Room.Noting that a typical American pre-schooler watches 28 hours of TV a week, Clinton said:"I cannot imagine anything that serves the public interest more than seeing to it that we give our children at least three hours of educational television a week."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
It's been more than 30 years since Julia Child first stepped onto a television set with a whisk, a copper bowl and some eggs and taught the world -- at least that part of the world that watched "educational" television -- to make an omelet.The world has changed since then, and television, public and commercial, has also changed. But Ms. Child is very much the same person that generations have known and loved and learned from. As she launches her third television series this season, "Cooking with Master Chefs," she remains a tall, distinguished woman, articulate in her distinctive voice, and still passionate about good food and good living.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
The Baltimore company known for its Sylvan tutoring centers is expanding into educational television with an agreement to co-produce the well-known Public Broadcasting Service children's series Reading Rainbow under a deal announced yesterday. It's not an entirely odd partnership for Educate Inc., which has been repositioning its business around consumer services in the past year. Besides its tutoring business and last year's acquisition of the Hooked on Phonics brand, the company said it wants to expand into broadcast media.
NEWS
By Susan Brink and Susan Brink,Los Angeles Times | November 17, 2006
Americans more than believe the health information they get from fictional television shows. Spurred by what they see on shows such as ER and The Bold and the Beautiful, they take action. They go to the doctor, surveys suggest. They tell a friend to have that cough checked. They ask a lover to use a condom. Fans develop trusting relationships with the characters who come into their homes each week, and industry insiders say they can't betray that trust. "I'm aware of the number of people who are paying attention to the facts around the fiction," says Jan Nash, executive producer of Without a Trace.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | July 3, 1993
Worried that children watch too much television, state education officials are pushing a law requiring new TVs sold in Maryland to have a device letting parents block certain channels and limit the time their children spend in front of the tube.The idea is the brainchild of State School Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and Robert C. Embry Jr., president of the state Board of Education. The concept has the unanimous backing of the board. Draft legislation could go to the board for formal approval as early as this month, said Mr. Embry.
NEWS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service Cox News Service contributed to this article | March 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Federal regulators are putting television stations on notice: Contrary to the past practice of many broadcasters, cartoons like "The Jetsons" and "The Flintstones" can no longer count as "educational and informational" programming.The announcement, issued Tuesday by the Federal Communications Commission, may not come as news to parents, whose households are in undated with cartoon turtles, rabbits and robots.But it could prove upsetting to broadcasters, who are required by a law enacted in 1990 to demonstrate their commitment to TC the educational needs of children as a condition of renewing their lucrative licenses every five years.
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