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NEWS
March 15, 2010
A civilized society needs sound and affordable health care and educational systems. This is simply because a civilized society needs healthy and well educated people to flourish. In our country, the health system is both expensive and broken. According to World Health Organization 2006 statistics, our country was No. 1 in terms of health care spending per capita but ranked only 39th for infant mortality and 36th for life expectancy. Statistics are not the whole story, but at this level, they are certainly telling us something.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2014
The article, "UM will give up $31 million to end ACC exit fee fight," (Aug. 9), really misses the big point, and that is the corruption in Maryland state government exhibited by President Wallace Loh and the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland in giving away $31 million of taxpayers' money in order to enter the Big Ten. When the announcement regarding the shift from the ACC to the Big Ten was first made public, I immediately filed...
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BUSINESS
April 24, 1991
"One of the really, really important things associated with this agenda that a lot of people don't understand . . . is that if you take one of . . . these nine components away, a lot of people would think that you have eight-ninths of it left. I would argue that you have zero-ninths of it left."This is not a menu-driven challenge. It is not a question of stringing together enough individual projects or pilot projects or demonstration projects or categorical programs. It's a question of doing the analysis to determine what set of structural features are so integrated that they will produce the power, synergistically, to move what is the single largest institutional structure in this state or in any other state.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 5, 2014
When people speak of a legacy, they usually mean something other than what the late economist Milton Friedman and his wife, Rose, left behind, namely the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice (edchoice.org). The foundation has just released a small book entitled " The ABC's of School Choice : The comprehensive guide to every private school choice program in America. " The Friedman philosophy can be summed up in two sentences, which are posted on their web page: "School choice gives parents the freedom to choose their children's education, while encouraging healthy competition among schools to better serve families' needs.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
Reader E. Yates' recent letter ( "Stop obsessing over student testing," Sept. 23) is the best discussion I've read about the problems with America's declining education system. The letter should be sent to the U.S. Department of Education because it clearly identifies why our children are falling behind those of other nations. I'm not an educator, but I am a concerned and educated citizen who's long been worried about the declining state of our educational system. Report after report ranks our children well behind those of other nations in critical subjects like mathematics, science and reading.
EXPLORE
February 7, 2012
I am writing to address Ken Ulman's recent letter, "School board must reflect makeup of Howard County. " I strongly disagree that "race, ethnic and geographic" characteristics should factor in the selection of Board of Education candidates. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. had a vision that people "will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. " I believe we live this dream, especially in Howard County. Perhaps that's why the task force's proposal met such strong opposition.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
Republican Roscoe Bartlett wants to improve the country's educational system, cut national debt and health-care costs and impose term limits on members of Congress.The candidate for the 6th District congressional seat began building a foundation for his campaign in Carroll by speaking to the county chapter of the Home Builders Associationof Maryland on Thursday night.Standing before about 50 people in the Wakefield Valley Golf and Conference Center banquet room with no podium or table on which to rest his notes, he talked for half an hour, wagging his finger at the group of homebuilders like a teacher, which is what he used to be.The Republican, whose campaign literature touts him as the descendantof a signer of the Declaration of Independence, has been many thingsin his 65 years, including farmer, inventor, medical researcher and homebuilder.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
In reference to Donald Norris' commentary, "Flacco's pay and our skewed priorities" (June 12), he is right on the mark regarding the outrageous salaries we pay our "jocks" - a fact that speaks volumes of our society's misguided values. However, as a political science teacher since 1964, I venture to say that Mr. Norris misses the boat with his recommendations on how to spend the money should a miracle occur and our educational system acquire an infusion of an additional $20 million. He focuses on utilizing the funds in institutions of higher learning, such as his own. With all due respect to Mr. Norris, I don't believe any amount should be designated for his university.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
My husband and I read with interest Jim Salvucci's commentary on the devaluation of education in society today ("Real work in the fake world," Jan. 8). His argument that saying academics are not part of the "real world" means they must be doing "fake work" in a "fake world" captures a sad truth about how education is perceived in our culture. We are both in our mid-70s and have spent most of our lives witnessing with some degree of horror the deterioration of our educational system.
EXPLORE
August 24, 2012
I was sorry to read of Mamie Perkins' retirement from the Howard County Public Schools. She proved her ability when she was deputy superintendent during the absence of Sydney Cousin. I heard no complaints about her leadership, ability or loyalty to the educational system of Howard County. In reading the article ("Deputy superintendent retires from school system," Aug. 9), I was amazed that a person with her experience (39 years) was not promoted to the position of superintendent and feel that Howard County lost an extremely qualified leader.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
Reader E. Yates' recent letter ( "Stop obsessing over student testing," Sept. 23) is the best discussion I've read about the problems with America's declining education system. The letter should be sent to the U.S. Department of Education because it clearly identifies why our children are falling behind those of other nations. I'm not an educator, but I am a concerned and educated citizen who's long been worried about the declining state of our educational system. Report after report ranks our children well behind those of other nations in critical subjects like mathematics, science and reading.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
As a lifelong resident of Harford County and teacher in its schools, it saddens me to observe the county council meetings where year after year education is neither prioritized nor fully funded ("Harford school budget cuts 46 positions," June 19). It infuriated me to read the words of our county executive disrespecting those in my profession. With frustration I sit at board of education meetings where decisions are not made to support teachers - the backbone of our educational system.
NEWS
June 20, 2013
In reference to Donald Norris' commentary, "Flacco's pay and our skewed priorities" (June 12), he is right on the mark regarding the outrageous salaries we pay our "jocks" - a fact that speaks volumes of our society's misguided values. However, as a political science teacher since 1964, I venture to say that Mr. Norris misses the boat with his recommendations on how to spend the money should a miracle occur and our educational system acquire an infusion of an additional $20 million. He focuses on utilizing the funds in institutions of higher learning, such as his own. With all due respect to Mr. Norris, I don't believe any amount should be designated for his university.
NEWS
By Anne D. Neal | May 29, 2013
"Please sir, I want some more. " The famous phrase of Oliver Twist would seem tragically appropriate when it comes to the modus operandi of American higher education - but for the fact that Oliver Twist was a starving child and higher education is a bloated wastrel. But the higher ed bubble is bursting, right in our own backyard. And colleges and universities need to take note, to ensure their own survival. The case in point is St. Mary's College of Maryland, a 173-year-old public institution tucked between the Potomac River and Chesapeake Bay. After a decade of rising tuition, this public liberal arts college finds itself with 150 empty seats for the incoming freshman class.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
My husband and I read with interest Jim Salvucci's commentary on the devaluation of education in society today ("Real work in the fake world," Jan. 8). His argument that saying academics are not part of the "real world" means they must be doing "fake work" in a "fake world" captures a sad truth about how education is perceived in our culture. We are both in our mid-70s and have spent most of our lives witnessing with some degree of horror the deterioration of our educational system.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | January 7, 2013
The Maryland State Department of Education has made a new round of revisions to its plans under the federal Race to the Top program to tie student achievement to educator effectiveness, but the U.S. Department of Education has expressed concern about the state's ability to implement the radically new system that is due to be rolled out this fall. In a letter sent to state officials last month, USDE approved a series of tweaks the state has made to its application, the majority of which altered how much weight will be given to various student achievement measures that will account for half of an educators' evaluation.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh JTCTY: BLACK HISTORY FOCUS ON EDUCATION, LETTER | February 4, 1992
This issue marks the eighth annual Black History supplement, and focuses on the education of African-Americans, past, present and future. We begin this issue by sharing the historical efforts that contributed to the education of African-Americans in Maryland. An active role was played by churches, which provided not only educational facilities, but personnel and financial resources.Of the many church schools started in the early 1800s, Bethel African-Methodist Episcopal Church is among those still with us today, although its existence has not been continuous.
NEWS
May 7, 1995
Schools' Money Isn't EnoughAn anonymous source once said, "Some things that are popular are not always right, and some things that are right are not always popular."The commissioners' proposal to fund only the maintenance of effort portion of the increase in the Board of Education's operating budget, while popular among a vocal minority, is not right. The commissioners are budgeting only enough money to fulfill their legal obligation: $2.25 million. This is a woefully inadequate amount of money.
EXPLORE
August 24, 2012
I was sorry to read of Mamie Perkins' retirement from the Howard County Public Schools. She proved her ability when she was deputy superintendent during the absence of Sydney Cousin. I heard no complaints about her leadership, ability or loyalty to the educational system of Howard County. In reading the article ("Deputy superintendent retires from school system," Aug. 9), I was amazed that a person with her experience (39 years) was not promoted to the position of superintendent and feel that Howard County lost an extremely qualified leader.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
God doesn't think he's a doctor. Surely you know that ancient wheeze. It comes to mind because the Associated Press Stylebook editors at the American Copy Editors Society's national conference in New Orleans last week restated their preference to restrict the use of the term Dr. to M.D.s and osteopaths. And, I think, dentists. Oh, and veterinarians. (Chiropractors can go roll a hoop.) Why people who spend the workday probing into other people's orifices are more worthy of dignity and respect than someone who has mastered quantum mechanics or Babylonian cuneiform continues to baffle me. But then, I was ten years in universities where Doctor was a more common form of direct address than dude .* I'm fairly sure that at one point at The Baltimore Sun we established that the courtesy title could be applied to any person possessing an earned doctorate.
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