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By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | September 13, 1993
When my oldest son was 5 or 6, I made a concerted effort to get him interested in educational software.I remember one particular "reading-is-fun" program that I thought was terrific. I dragged the lad down to my office, parked him in front of the screen and put him to work.Being a dutiful child (or at least semi-cooperative), Ike plugged away at it for 15 minutes, but he obviously wasn't enjoying it. Finally, he turned around and said, "Daddy, I do this all day at school. Do I have to do it at home, too?"
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Blackboard Inc., a major provider of Internet-based education software based in Washington, on Monday acquired a small Baltimore-based competitor to stake its claim in the open source software technology. Blackboard bought Moodlerooms Inc., which has 82 employees in Baltimore, for an undisclosed amount, and said it intends to allow the company to operate independently. As part of the same announcement, Blackboard said it acquired NetSpot, another competitor in Australia that also uses a similar open-source technology platform as Moodlerooms Blackboard, a privately held company founded in 1997, licenses commercial software used by schools, companies and government agencies for online learning and organization.
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BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | December 8, 1996
WHEN OUR firstborn was 6 years old, I decided I could improve him with some exposure to educational software. So we fired up a cute little reading program and sat down together in front of the screen for a some digital father-son bonding.The lad dutifully followed all the directions, sounded out the words, watched the little cartoons and punched the keys at all the right times. I was delighted. Wasn't this what computers were designed to do?After 15 minutes of this electronic bliss, an exasperated Ike finally turned to me and said, "Daddy, I do this all day at school.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Educational software - which is used in most school districts across Maryland - appears to have no effect in improving student achievement although it can cost as much as $100 per child, a federally funded study has concluded. The results of the study, which was released this week by the U.S. Department of Education, is likely to prompt school districts, including Baltimore's, to look more closely at whether to purchase the software or invest in other strategies. The educational software industry is disputing the study's findings, saying they could have been skewed by poor training of teachers and other factors.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | November 25, 1991
As the father of two boys who prefer to spend their computer time with baseball simulations or galactic war games, I've spent an inordinate amount of time looking at educational software over the last year.I have some good news and bad news.The good news is that educational software is better than ever, with superb graphics, plenty of entertainment value and solid educational content.The bad news is that the good news may not matter.As my older boy, Ike, once said to me when I sat him down in front of what I thought was a terrific early reading program, "Daddy, I do this all day in school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By PAULA GALLAGHER and PAULA GALLAGHER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 1998
If the holidays meant the arrival of a new computer at your house, you're probably ready to hit the stores in search of some worthwhile software.The array of products available is astounding, and it's tough to choose on the basis of a colorful box. If you took the computer plunge as a means to enrich your children's learning experience, the last thing you want to hear is "This is borrrring."A good way to get started is to look for the familiar - characters your children know and enjoy from books or television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOHN BARRY and JOHN BARRY,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 7, 1998
A decade into the home-computer era and high-tech children's education, the information highway has come to look like an expressway: fast and crowded, perilous in the curves, blighted by ticky-tacky - but absolutely necessary to get anywhere.Avoidance is not an option. U.S. schools are spending $5 billion on computers this year. More than 10 million children signed on to the Internet this summer. Those who hang back are going to miss out.The problem, though, is the road kill. Fouling children's first computer experiences is shabby, nonrefundable software, craftily marketed to disguise shortcomings until removed from the shrink wrap.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to The Sun | December 27, 2006
Jim Silvestri has always been fascinated by weather. Every winter, the Glenelg Country School earth sciences teacher conducts a weather unit with his eighth-grade class. But when his school purchased a weather-tracking station, the educator was inspired to measure wind chills and heat indexes outside the classroom and start a weather club. "We get to come here, take a little break and play with the computers," said 12-year-old John Chalk. The Ellicott City seventh-grader has been in the Weather Club for two years.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | November 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Education Alternatives Inc. took the first step yesterday toward injecting high-technology into nine Baltimore schools, announcing that it had formed an alliance with Computer Curriculum Corp. to supply the schools with more than 1,000 computers equipped with advanced educational software.The deal, which could cost EAI upward of $1 million a year, would put Tandy computers in the classrooms, as well as additional machines in media centers and administrative offices.The 4,800 pupils in the nine schools that EAI has contracted to run would be able to call up multi-media exercises and study programs, print out reference material and learn at their own speed.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
Educational software - which is used in most school districts across Maryland - appears to have no effect in improving student achievement although it can cost as much as $100 per child, a federally funded study has concluded. The results of the study, which was released this week by the U.S. Department of Education, is likely to prompt school districts, including Baltimore's, to look more closely at whether to purchase the software or invest in other strategies. The educational software industry is disputing the study's findings, saying they could have been skewed by poor training of teachers and other factors.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,Special to The Sun | December 27, 2006
Jim Silvestri has always been fascinated by weather. Every winter, the Glenelg Country School earth sciences teacher conducts a weather unit with his eighth-grade class. But when his school purchased a weather-tracking station, the educator was inspired to measure wind chills and heat indexes outside the classroom and start a weather club. "We get to come here, take a little break and play with the computers," said 12-year-old John Chalk. The Ellicott City seventh-grader has been in the Weather Club for two years.
BUSINESS
By Rhasheema A. Sweeting and Rhasheema A. Sweeting,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2005
Hooked on Phonics, famous for its late-night TV infomercials, hopes to capture sales with a more traditional format under a new Baltimore-based owner: Its products will soon be available at major retailers nationwide. The brand, acquired by Educate Inc. from Gateway Learning Corp. for $13 million in January, aims to reach more customers at retail outlets such as Wal-Mart, Target and Amazon.com. "We're moving to retail distribution to give parents and educators easier access to our award-winning products," said Chip Paucek, general manager for Hooked on Phonics.
NEWS
By Andrew G. Sherwood and Andrew G. Sherwood,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
Three Harford County public school pupils have been awarded $5,000 college scholarships from BrainstormUSA. Timothy Butler, a second-grader, and Henry Baumgart Jr., a fifth-grader, both enrolled at William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary School in Abingdon, along with Allison Bredder, a fifth-grader at Forest Lakes Elementary School in Forest Hill, won the BrainstormUSA "Dare to Dream ... Expect to Succeed" scholarship. BrainstormUSA is an Atlanta-based marketer of educational software, videos and computers.
NEWS
October 2, 2004
Software helps educators meet new standards Reporter Alec MacGillis' series "Poor Schools, Rich Targets" (Sept. 19-Sept. 21) attempted to cast doubt on the efficacy of educational software and the practices of software publishers. While our industry welcomes honest criticism, the series ignored or skewed important facts, and this causes us to contest its conclusions. Educational software companies are partnering with educators to move toward the common goal of modernizing school practice and preparing students for the 21st century.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
LOGAN, W. VA. - Earlier this year, two salespeople drove deep into the coal country of West Virginia on an improbable mission: selling expensive education software in one of the poorest corners of America. Logan County does not look like promising sales territory. Its mines have laid off thousands, methamphetamine labs abound, and every spring flooding creeks threaten impoverished hollows. But for Ron Dellinger and Samiha Lamerson, the two salespeople from Plato Learning Inc., the region's despair was not an obstacle.
NEWS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 2003
The walls of Carissa Bryant's home on Meadow Valley Drive in the Woodlands subdivision of Abingdon are an abridged biography of the already successful 7-year-old's life. Student of the Month awards, each carefully framed, hang on the entry wall of her room to the left. They date to 1999 and follow consecutively each year, uninterrupted, to Carissa's current post in second grade at William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary School, a Harford County public school in Abingdon. A larger frame beside the bedroom window highlights last year's prize from the Harford County Reading Council - first place in the 21st Annual Writing Contest, for a story that she wrote and illustrated about a little boy who loves to draw.
FEATURES
July 26, 1998
What should you expect from good educational software? Here are some ideas:* Skills should be based on sound educational principles. (Check the company's Web site or literature to find out about the educational consultants.)* Commands should be short and simple.* Graphics (animation) should have auditory and visual appeal to engage your child.* Sound should be clear and the words spoken by the computer easy to understand.* Activities (scenes or adventures) should be varied to maintain interest, and should offer increasing levels of difficulty.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | November 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Education Alternatives Inc. took the first step yesterday toward injecting high-technology into nine Baltimore schools, announcing that it had formed an alliance with Computer Curriculum Corp. to supply the schools with more than 1,000 computers equipped with advanced educational software.The deal, which could cost EAI more than $1 million a year, would put Tandy computers in the classrooms, as well as additional machines in media centers and administrative offices.The 4,800 pupils in the nine schools that EAI has contracted to run would be able to call up multimedia exercises and study programs, print out reference material and learn at their own speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Kranish and Michael Kranish,BOSTON GLOBE | June 18, 2001
At Apple Computer's first company store, in Tyson's Corner, Va., everything seems just as the creators of the digital universe intended. Black-clad salesman talk soothingly about titanium-coated Power-books, while children sit on futuristic ball-shaped chairs and learn mathematics from translucent iMacs. But spend a few minutes talking to parents in line outside the store right after it opens - there is a lengthy queue just to shop - and it becomes clear that the big question isn't whether to go Mac or Windows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By PAULA GALLAGHER and PAULA GALLAGHER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 1998
If the holidays meant the arrival of a new computer at your house, you're probably ready to hit the stores in search of some worthwhile software.The array of products available is astounding, and it's tough to choose on the basis of a colorful box. If you took the computer plunge as a means to enrich your children's learning experience, the last thing you want to hear is "This is borrrring."A good way to get started is to look for the familiar - characters your children know and enjoy from books or television.
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