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May 16, 2002
Jules Jacobsen, 83, who helped put Brown `N Serve rolls on America's dinner tables more than half a century ago, died Saturday at his home in Lantana, Fla. Mr. Jacobsen stumbled across one of the first kitchen shortcuts when his friend, volunteer firefighter Joe Gregor, went out on a fire call and came back to a pan of half-baked rolls. The ex-GI pair, living in a small town northwest of Lake Okeechobee, had been contemplating a way to deliver pre-made, bakery-fresh bread to homes and still manage to serve them piping hot for dinner.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
Starting this month, aspiring and continuing teachers could take a significant step toward becoming -- or remaining -- full-fledged educators, through a fast-track program at Carroll Community College. The summer classes enable teachers to come closer to state Department of Education certification in less time. Students would still have to pass required exams and fulfill other certification criteria. The program caters to career changers who need certification to teach, educators looking to maintain their certification or "conditional" teachers, who are hired with content-area degrees, contingent on their certification, said Libby Little, chair of teacher education and academic services at the college.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
Starting this month, aspiring and continuing teachers could take a significant step toward becoming -- or remaining -- full-fledged educators, through a fast-track program at Carroll Community College. The summer classes enable teachers to come closer to state Department of Education certification in less time. Students would still have to pass required exams and fulfill other certification criteria. The program caters to career changers who need certification to teach, educators looking to maintain their certification or "conditional" teachers, who are hired with content-area degrees, contingent on their certification, said Libby Little, chair of teacher education and academic services at the college.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld and Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
As parents of pupils at McCormick Elementary School in Rosedale received letters yesterday about the absence of a principal accused of sexually assaulting two pupils in the late 1970s, experts in law and psychology said the case might highlight issues arising from "recovered" memories. Kevin M. Lindsey, 50, is accused of sexually assaulting two sisters more than two decades ago while he was a teacher at Pine Grove Elementary School in Carney. Both women say they recently remembered being assaulted, according to police charging documents.
NEWS
April 9, 1995
Beth DaveyUM professorDr. Beth Davey, a retired professor of education at the University of Maryland who was recognized nationally for her research in remedial reading, died March 31 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Silver Spring resident was 51.Dr. Davey, who joined the faculty at the University of Maryland in 1971, trained teacher educators and reading specialists at the graduate and undergraduate level.Former students recalled her dedication to teaching and commitment to research.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld and Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
As parents of pupils at McCormick Elementary School in Rosedale received letters yesterday about the absence of a principal accused of sexually assaulting two pupils in the late 1970s, experts in law and psychology said the case might highlight issues arising from "recovered" memories. Kevin M. Lindsey, 50, is accused of sexually assaulting two sisters more than two decades ago while he was a teacher at Pine Grove Elementary School in Carney. Both women say they recently remembered being assaulted, according to police charging documents.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
Baltimore school officials announced three years ago that they were ending a long-standing practice of social promotion that had allowed failing students to advance to the next grade whether or not they had met the standards. The new policy was clear: Students would meet performance standards in each grade or be held back. No exceptions. Now, faced with significant numbers of students being held back more than once, the city school system is backpedaling from that policy. This year, more than 2,700 failing students in the city were promoted - more than half because they had been held back before, and school officials were leery of holding them back again.
NEWS
September 5, 1996
Anne Arundel Community College has named Frances M. Turcott director of public relations and marketing.Turcott, who has held the same position at Harford Community College for five years and before that held it at Catonsville Community College for two years, will be responsible for planning, developing and coordinating college public relations and marketing programs.She also will co-chair the enrollment development committee with the dean for enrollment services.Turcott earned a bachelor's degree in foreign language education and a master's in educational psychology/guidance and counseling at the University of Tennessee.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan | March 6, 2005
Martha A. Smith Occupation: President, Anne Arundel Community College In the news: Smith welcomed President Bush to the Arnold campus Wednesday as he gave a speech on job training and praised the college as a model for preparing workers. Career highlights: Since Smith arrived as AACC president in 1994, she has overseen the construction of a satellite campus at Arundel Mills and new centers for student services, fine arts, and applied learning and technology in Arnold. The two-year college is developing a plan to adapt curriculum to future labor market demands.
NEWS
July 21, 2006
Martha E. Peterson, 90, president of Barnard College in the turbulent Vietnam War era who went on hold the same position at Beloit College in Wisconsin, died July 14 at her home in Madison, Wis. Miss Peterson was known for fostering calm at Barnard's campus in the Morningside Heights section of Manhattan during the late 1960s and early 1970s, when student demonstrations roiled the neighboring campus of Columbia University. President of Barnard from 1967 to 1975, she said shortly after her appointment: "I'm not alarmed by student demonstrations.
NEWS
May 16, 2002
Jules Jacobsen, 83, who helped put Brown `N Serve rolls on America's dinner tables more than half a century ago, died Saturday at his home in Lantana, Fla. Mr. Jacobsen stumbled across one of the first kitchen shortcuts when his friend, volunteer firefighter Joe Gregor, went out on a fire call and came back to a pan of half-baked rolls. The ex-GI pair, living in a small town northwest of Lake Okeechobee, had been contemplating a way to deliver pre-made, bakery-fresh bread to homes and still manage to serve them piping hot for dinner.
NEWS
April 9, 1995
Beth DaveyUM professorDr. Beth Davey, a retired professor of education at the University of Maryland who was recognized nationally for her research in remedial reading, died March 31 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Silver Spring resident was 51.Dr. Davey, who joined the faculty at the University of Maryland in 1971, trained teacher educators and reading specialists at the graduate and undergraduate level.Former students recalled her dedication to teaching and commitment to research.
NEWS
October 11, 2003
John G. Brennan, a retired clinical psychologist who taught at what was then Towson State College, died of complications of diabetes Oct. 4 at his Pikesville home. He was 73. Mr. Brennan was born and reared near Wellington, New Zealand. He earned his bachelor's degree in educational psychology in 1964 from Victoria University of Wellington. He earned an honors bachelor's degree from the same university the next year. He earned a master's degree in the discipline from Victoria University of Wellington in 1971 and his doctorate in psychology in 1981 from Clayton University in Missouri.
SPORTS
By Steve Lowery and Steve Lowery,Los Angeles Daily News | November 8, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- While the news of Magic Johnson's retirement after testing HIV-positive figures to be devastating news to all of his fans, it could be especially disturbing to some of his youngest admirers.While they advise sensitivity, child psychologists say parents should be honest in discussing Johnson's situation with their children."You have to be very straight forward," said Jeffrey Derevensky, a professor of educational psychology and counseling at Montreal's McGill University. "Kids who are 10 or 12 are certainly familiar with the concept of the disease.
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