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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Haron "Hal" Dahan, a successful self-made immigrant home builder whose philanthropic interests included educational institutions in Baltimore and Israel, died Monday from heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 87. "Haron was a giant. He was not just a philanthropist but he was also a decent man and friend. He was the most decent man I've ever met and the nicest guy in the world. He's major league," said Rabbi Mitchell Wohlberg of Beth Tfiloh Congregation, a longtime friend. "I never heard one bad word about him from either his personal or business life," he said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Geraldine G.M. Dell, an artist who actively supported and volunteered at various cultural and educational institutions, died Oct. 9 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 65. "She was a very talented and vivacious lady in every sense of the word. She was a grand English lady," said Stiles T. Colwill, an interior designer and longtime close friend who owns Stiles Colwill Interiors in Lutherville. "She was just extraordinary. " The daughter of a textile company owner and a homemaker who were from England and Scotland, the former Geraldine Gail Meikle McKellar was born in London and raised in Ascot, England.
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NEWS
January 29, 2002
David Harvey, 36, creator of African-American flag David Harvey, who founded a company that conceived of and sold an African-American flag, died of a heart attack Jan. 22 at his Morgan Park home. He was 36. He was the president and chief executive officer of Daton Inc., a Northeast Baltimore firm he started in 1991. Family members said that while attending a Black History Month banquet that year, he and his wife, the former Tonya Ivory, got the idea for a flag. They collaborated on its design, which combined red, white, blue, black, green, purple and gold.
NEWS
By Donald F. Norris | June 11, 2013
A few days ago, yet another article appeared in The Baltimore Sun about Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco and his contract that will pay him more than $20 million per year for the next six years. That's a total of over $120 million. I don't know Joe Flacco. I am sure that if I knew him I would like him, and that if we were neighbors, we'd get along just fine. But that is not why I write. And I am not writing because I am jealous of Joe Flacco's good fortune, or because I don't think he is worth it based on his competitive value in football.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2011
Once again, Dan Rodricks has voiced his hang-up with the Catholic Church with a cheap and inaccurate shot accusing the Archdiocese of Baltimore of "looking petty when it refuses to sell its vacant school buildings to city charter schools" ("Street food and soccer, war and Westboro," March 24). Note he wrote buildings, plural, not the single school building in the news recently. In fact, the Archdiocese announced on March 24 the sale of St. Rose of Lima Catholic School and convent in Brooklyn to The Children's Guild, an operator of two city charter schools.
NEWS
February 6, 2009
A few days ago, customers of Baltimore-based Provident Bank received notification that their credit and debit card numbers may have been compromised in a theft described as potentially one of the largest personal data heists ever. The culprit here was a piece of malicious software placed on the computer network of Heartland Payment Systems in Princeton, N.J., which processes 100 million transactions a month. Although officials don't know how many Provident customers or other consumers were victimized, the breach at Heartland is just one wave in a rising tide of data theft that suggests tough new federal controls are needed on how organizations handle the data they collect.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 14, 1991
Education Secretary Lamar Alexander has delayed reauthorizing one of the nation's six major regional accrediting associations for colleges and universities until he can review the organization's new emphasis on cultural diversity as a criterion for evaluating the institutions.Educators said they could not recall the federal government ever before challenging the standards applied by an accrediting organization in judging the academic fitness of educational institutions.Mr. Alexander's decision involves the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, which has responsibility for reviewing the academic credentials of most colleges and universities in Maryland, Delaware, the District of Columbia, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
TOPIC
By Robert C. Embry Jr. and Robert C. Embry Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 2002
Everybody wants children to be taught by competent teachers. In fact, numerous studies have documented the dramatic positive and measurable impact a good teacher can have on students and the harm that can be done by a bad teacher. Legislators, education regulatory agencies and editorial writers would have us believe that teachers in our public schools must be "certified" to be effective. The prevailing dogma is that teacher certification equals teacher competence, while lack of certification means incompetence.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
A division of the World Bank Group announced Wednesday that it has invested $150 million in Laureate Education Inc., giving the international development organization a small stake in the Baltimore-based global higher education company. "It's an incredibly strong endorsement for the company," said Douglas L. Becker, Laureate's chairman and CEO, of the investment by the International Finance Corp. and its affiliate, the IFC African, Latin American and Caribbean Fund. With annual revenue of about $4 billion, Laureate does not need the money but is eager to have the backing of an investor led by members of international governments, he said.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | October 27, 2004
WHY WILL so many Americans buy images of national leaders that are so at odds with so much evidence? This troubling question is crucial because the American democracy was founded on the notion that the truth will emerge in the deliberations of a free people. Fear is surely a factor, especially so since our country came under attack three years ago. When we're afraid, we lose our tolerance for ambiguity. Black-and-white thinking is in: You're either for us or against us. When in the grip of fear, we crave certainty, because uncertainty magnifies the feeling of vulnerability.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Haron "Hal" Dahan, a successful self-made immigrant home builder whose philanthropic interests included educational institutions in Baltimore and Israel, died Monday from heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 87. "Haron was a giant. He was not just a philanthropist but he was also a decent man and friend. He was the most decent man I've ever met and the nicest guy in the world. He's major league," said Rabbi Mitchell Wohlberg of Beth Tfiloh Congregation, a longtime friend. "I never heard one bad word about him from either his personal or business life," he said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
A division of the World Bank Group announced Wednesday that it has invested $150 million in Laureate Education Inc., giving the international development organization a small stake in the Baltimore-based global higher education company. "It's an incredibly strong endorsement for the company," said Douglas L. Becker, Laureate's chairman and CEO, of the investment by the International Finance Corp. and its affiliate, the IFC African, Latin American and Caribbean Fund. With annual revenue of about $4 billion, Laureate does not need the money but is eager to have the backing of an investor led by members of international governments, he said.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
The president of Baltimore City Community College was forced out this week, following a tumultuous two years and a recent dramatic drop in enrollment. President Carolane Williams said she was caught off guard when two trustees called her Monday to say she had been "separated" from the college. Williams, who has headed the college for six years, said she was "confused" by the board's abrupt decision, which was announced Tuesday. "It came as a surprise, because there had been no previous conversations about it or any leadership issues that they had been concerned about, either from the board chair or the board as a whole," Williams said.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2011
Once again, Dan Rodricks has voiced his hang-up with the Catholic Church with a cheap and inaccurate shot accusing the Archdiocese of Baltimore of "looking petty when it refuses to sell its vacant school buildings to city charter schools" ("Street food and soccer, war and Westboro," March 24). Note he wrote buildings, plural, not the single school building in the news recently. In fact, the Archdiocese announced on March 24 the sale of St. Rose of Lima Catholic School and convent in Brooklyn to The Children's Guild, an operator of two city charter schools.
NEWS
February 6, 2009
A few days ago, customers of Baltimore-based Provident Bank received notification that their credit and debit card numbers may have been compromised in a theft described as potentially one of the largest personal data heists ever. The culprit here was a piece of malicious software placed on the computer network of Heartland Payment Systems in Princeton, N.J., which processes 100 million transactions a month. Although officials don't know how many Provident customers or other consumers were victimized, the breach at Heartland is just one wave in a rising tide of data theft that suggests tough new federal controls are needed on how organizations handle the data they collect.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 6, 2007
Anne M. "Nan" Pinkard, former president of the France-Merrick Foundation, whose philanthropy through the years had a profound effect on many of Baltimore's cultural and educational institutions, died of respiratory failure Saturday at the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 83. "She was a great leader, and her death is a huge loss to the community," Robert W. Schaefer, the foundation's executive director, said yesterday. "There were literally hundreds of organizations both large and small that she helped and where a $25,000 grant could be just as important and meaningful as a million-dollar one."
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Jennifer McMenamin and Sara Neufeld and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
In the wake of the siege of a school in Russia by Chechen militants that ended with 330 dead, some parents across Eastern Europe are apparently afraid to send their children back to the classroom. And they're turning to North Baltimore's private Calvert School - among other American educational institutions - for help. The Calvert School, an internationally known supplier of educational materials for parents who teach their children at home, is seeing a surge of online inquiries from families in Russia, where a school in the southern city of Beslan was stormed by militants last month, and elsewhere in Eastern Europe.
NEWS
By CALVIN W. BURNETT | July 16, 1991
As part of the state plan for postsecondary education, Higher Education Secretary Shaila R. Aery has recommended that the Maryland Higher Education Commission study the consolidation of Morgan State University and Coppin State College in order, presumably, to strengthen their ability to address urban problems. We are strongly opposed to this recommendation, which apparently is based on the assumptions that historically black institutions are essentially alike because they serve primarily the African American community and that that community is homogeneous in its educational needs.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | October 27, 2004
WHY WILL so many Americans buy images of national leaders that are so at odds with so much evidence? This troubling question is crucial because the American democracy was founded on the notion that the truth will emerge in the deliberations of a free people. Fear is surely a factor, especially so since our country came under attack three years ago. When we're afraid, we lose our tolerance for ambiguity. Black-and-white thinking is in: You're either for us or against us. When in the grip of fear, we crave certainty, because uncertainty magnifies the feeling of vulnerability.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Jennifer McMenamin and Sara Neufeld and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
In the wake of the siege of a school in Russia by Chechen militants that ended with 330 dead, some parents across Eastern Europe are apparently afraid to send their children back to the classroom. And they're turning to North Baltimore's private Calvert School - among other American educational institutions - for help. The Calvert School, an internationally known supplier of educational materials for parents who teach their children at home, is seeing a surge of online inquiries from families in Russia, where a school in the southern city of Beslan was stormed by militants last month, and elsewhere in Eastern Europe.
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