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By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2007
JOWHAR, Somalia -- A nation overwhelmed by civil war, flooding and, most recently, the threat of starvation might be forgiven for overlooking the back-to-school season. But Abdulkhadir Wasuge, 43, has devoted his life to making sure his corner of Somalia never forgets. Over the past 14 years, Wasuge has emerged as a leading education advocate in this Horn of Africa country, one of the many unsung heroes who have stepped up to fill the void left by the government's collapse in 1991. As he does each year, the father of eight recently made the rounds in Jowhar, 60 miles north of Mogadishu, the capital, collecting enrollment figures, assessing curriculums and reminding parents and community leaders about the importance of putting children in school.
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NEWS
By Xiaohui Wu | August 3, 2014
As a foreigner in the United States, one question I've often been asked by newly-met friends has been "What do you find special about America?" I always have a good answer for that question: "Education. " American children have colorful lives while their Chinese peers are locked up in studies. Surprisingly, many of my American friends are not as optimistic about the American system. In fact, they've told me it's the U.S. education system that's problematic and perhaps should learn from the Chinese system.
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NEWS
By Michael Slackman and Michael Slackman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2002
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Martabha Saleem earns $4 to $5 a week selling cigarettes, more than a teacher, doctor or engineer makes in a month. The 14-year-old attends school, but the most important lesson he says he has learned on the streets of central Baghdad is that no amount of studying will help him, or his family, survive. Survival is a lesson that Sheda Ibrahim, 15, is learning. Having been unable to attend classes for two years, she spends her time watching television or helping her aunt in the kitchen.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Your article on the University System of Maryland's highest earners apparently was not intended to address the really big issue ( "UM coaches, UMB doctors among state's highest earners," June 28). The real issue is the self-sustaining, government-run education system whose creation we have allowed that leaves students saddled with tens of thousands of dollars in debt designed to help pay the exorbitant salaries of too many university presidents, professors and bureaucrats. Furthermore, why do we even need so many universities in Maryland, each with its own president and staff, and all trying to outdo each other with programs, stadiums, field houses, etc., that only perpetuate the problem?
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2004
MAYOR Martin O'Malley is so intrigued by the education system in Chicago that he has scheduled a fact-finding trip to the Windy City this month. He'll find a school system that underwent considerable reform in the late 1990s under the direction of Paul G. Vallas, the city's former budget director appointed schools chief in 1995 by Mayor Richard M. Daley. In five years, until Vallas fell out of favor at City Hall and resigned, he eliminated deficits in the system's $3.5 billion budget, raised test scores (which then leveled)
NEWS
By George La Noue | October 27, 2013
U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Blake issued a long awaited, 60-page ruling this month in the case Coalition for Educational Equity and Excellence v. Maryland Higher Education Commission. The litigation was brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions (HBIs), Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The plaintiffs argued that the state of Maryland had failed in its obligation under the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to desegregate its higher education system.
NEWS
By Xiaohui Wu | August 3, 2014
As a foreigner in the United States, one question I've often been asked by newly-met friends has been "What do you find special about America?" I always have a good answer for that question: "Education. " American children have colorful lives while their Chinese peers are locked up in studies. Surprisingly, many of my American friends are not as optimistic about the American system. In fact, they've told me it's the U.S. education system that's problematic and perhaps should learn from the Chinese system.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
Emily Blumenauer's commentary instructing teachers "quit complaining about Common Core" is an example of how the follow-the-crowd mentality of our society seeks to silence those brave enough to stand up to wrongs ( "Quit complaining about Common Core," June 16). The complacent don't want to hear from dissenters because it makes their own submissive obedience so obvious. Many teachers are raising concerns about the implementation of Common Core not only on their own behalf but on behalf of their students as well.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
California Gov. Jerry Brown has done a lot to finally balance his state's budget, but his greatest challenge still lies ahead ("Jerry Brown: A survivor at the top of his game," Feb. 3). In 1978, during Mr. Brown's first term as governor, he helped pass Proposition 13, a property tax cap that has mostly benefited large corporations at the expense of California's once elite education system. Since the passage of Proposition 13, California schools have gone from the best in the country to 49th in education spending.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | April 26, 1992
It's 7:45 a.m. on a Monday at Baltimore-Washington International Airport -- muffin and bagel vendors have shifted into high gear -- and David Hornbeck is deep into notes for a high-level meeting that will take place in another airport -- New York's La Guardia -- before he flies to a third meeting in Cincinnati.David Karem, one of the Kentucky legislators who hired Mr.Hornbeck in 1989, says his pitch is most alluring because he talks about the future of children, rather than education."My first and foremost reason to work with David was that he was the only consultant we interviewed who talked about kids.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
Emily Blumenauer's commentary instructing teachers "quit complaining about Common Core" is an example of how the follow-the-crowd mentality of our society seeks to silence those brave enough to stand up to wrongs ( "Quit complaining about Common Core," June 16). The complacent don't want to hear from dissenters because it makes their own submissive obedience so obvious. Many teachers are raising concerns about the implementation of Common Core not only on their own behalf but on behalf of their students as well.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 5, 2014
When people speak of a legacy, they usually mean something other than what the late economist Milton Friedman and his wife, Rose, left behind, namely the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice (edchoice.org). The foundation has just released a small book entitled " The ABC's of School Choice : The comprehensive guide to every private school choice program in America. " The Friedman philosophy can be summed up in two sentences, which are posted on their web page: "School choice gives parents the freedom to choose their children's education, while encouraging healthy competition among schools to better serve families' needs.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
It's no secret that for the past eight months the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners had been conducting a robust search for the system's next CEO. With the board's selection of Gregory Thornton to take the helm, I believe the next CEO has been carefully chosen ( "New Baltimore schools chief navigated complex terrain in Milwaukee," Feb. 23). I am so honored to have been a member of the board at such a pivotal moment. I witnessed the careful decisions that were made to put the most suitable person in the leadership role responsible for 85,000 students.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
We know that Baltimore County's teachers chose their essential profession out of a love of teaching and love of children. A growing group of parents, teachers, grandparents and citizens have formed to protect our children and support you, our teachers in Baltimore County. We originally came together when a parent was arrested for speaking up during a school board forum on Common Core, which alarmed and enraged citizens in Maryland and across the country. The incident affirmed our belief that recent education reforms, including Common Core standards, are being implemented in a manner that excludes parental, educator and public input.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Baltimore County's school board is one of the less than 10 percent of the school boards in the nation that is not elected by the local voters. Presently, members are selected by the governor who, in this case, is from Baltimore City. The next governor may be from Montgomery or Prince George's County near Washington, D.C. Why should a politician who has neither roots nor relationship to Baltimore County select our local educational leaders? Abraham Lincoln once said, "Government closest to the people governs best.
NEWS
By George La Noue | October 27, 2013
U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Blake issued a long awaited, 60-page ruling this month in the case Coalition for Educational Equity and Excellence v. Maryland Higher Education Commission. The litigation was brought by supporters of Maryland's historically black institutions (HBIs), Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The plaintiffs argued that the state of Maryland had failed in its obligation under the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause to desegregate its higher education system.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
Your article on the University System of Maryland's highest earners apparently was not intended to address the really big issue ( "UM coaches, UMB doctors among state's highest earners," June 28). The real issue is the self-sustaining, government-run education system whose creation we have allowed that leaves students saddled with tens of thousands of dollars in debt designed to help pay the exorbitant salaries of too many university presidents, professors and bureaucrats. Furthermore, why do we even need so many universities in Maryland, each with its own president and staff, and all trying to outdo each other with programs, stadiums, field houses, etc., that only perpetuate the problem?
NEWS
November 13, 1991
* John Wootton, 24, of Ellicott City, student is sociology and social work at University of Maryland at Baltimore:No. I come from Westminster and was in a (school) marching band. I knew how much that meant, to move to different areas for competition. Once again, they're taking money from the education system. Schools are a primary prevention program. Educating today's kids means tomorrow's future. Programslike the sports teams and bands gives kids a sense of pride in theirschool. That's important when talking to peers.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The report by Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot on the economic benefits to Maryland from a post-Labor Day school start deserves far more respect, attention and consideration than given to it in a recent editorial in The Sun ("One week and counting," Aug. 19). The comptroller's report follows approval of legislation in the last General Assembly session to establish a task force to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland public schools. It is worth noting that following public hearings in both the House and the Senate, the legislation calling for this study passed the Senate 46 to 1, passed the House of Delegates 124 to 6 and was signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | July 2, 2013
Both public libraries and free, universal public education are regarded as cornerstones of American democracy. A line of reasoning embraced by the nation's founders holds that for the regency of the general public to endure, the elected government would have to make sound and reasonable public policy decisions. That government would also have to change its public policy decisions when it made mistakes. Importantly, the people making the decisions would have to know when to change and when to stay the course on a particular public policy direction.
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