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By Marta H. Mossburg | January 18, 2011
Maryland spends on public education like a Saudi prince in Tiffany's. According to an analysis of data from the Annual Survey of State Government Finances from the U.S. Census Bureau, all education spending accounted for 47 percent of Maryland's total revenue in 2009, the most recent year available. Health spending, which is always cited as the monster in the state budget, ate 9 percent of total revenue in 2009. By comparison, public education represented 26 percent of total revenue in 2000.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
President Barack Obama proposed a $3.9 trillion federal budget on Tuesday that calls for spending billions more on infrastructure, raising taxes on the wealthy and closing the gap between rich and poor that he has vowed to make a focus of his second term. The budget - drafted with this fall's congressional elections on the horizon - includes a host of policies likely to appeal to Democratic voters, such as expanding early childhood education, raising tobacco taxes and boosting a tax credit for the poor.
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NEWS
February 19, 1996
AS A PUBLIC SERVICE, here's a glossary to help follow the confusing efforts in Annapolis to weaken a law that guarantees steady local funding for education.Irony: County executives and their supporters in the legislature fighting to weaken the 10-year-old law that ensures "maintenance of effort" on education spending even as a clamor is heard across Maryland that more money, not less, should be spent on schools.Chutzpah: When county leaders argue that they can't afford to keep up with school enrollment growth because of a flat tax base, even though they argued a few months ago that the state of Maryland should do that very thing.
NEWS
December 26, 2013
¿     Maryland leads the nation in education spending, but not necessarily achievement . ¿     Democrats in the Maryland General Assembly began to go after referendum process after the 2012 success of MDPetitions.com in petitioning issues to the ballots. ¿     Thanks to high tobacco tax rates, Maryland was found to be a leader in cigarette smuggling . ¿     Red Maryland broadcast live from the 2013 MDCAN Turning the Tides Conference, which included a protest by former Delegate Saqib Ali over the inclusion of Pamela Gellar as a speaker.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2002
The Maryland Senate approved a $1.3 billion plan to boost spending on schools yesterday -- funded in part by a cigarette tax increase -- after a threatened filibuster failed to materialize. The legislation would write into law most of the recommendations of the Thornton Commission, which urged the state to spend more on schools and to target the money to the poorest districts. The bill goes to the House, where it faces opposition from delegates who say it's too expensive. But supporters of the Senate plan say they're hopeful they can convince the House that passage is crucial to the future of Maryland's public schools.
NEWS
By New York Times | August 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Education Department has made public a back-to-school report that Education Secretary Lamar Alexander says would give a "heightened sense of urgency" to passage of President Bush's proposed education legislation.The report predicted record spending on education at all levels and an increased enrollment of children in preschool programs. But government officials said increased expenditures for each pupil had not translated into better educated students."Enrollment is up, spending is up, achievement is down," said Diane Ravitch, assistant secretary for the Office of Educational Research and Improvement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
The General Assembly has approved a tough new law that will require Maryland's counties and Baltimore to keep up a minimum level of education spending or risk having the state withhold part of their annual tax collections and ship the money directly to local school boards. The House of Delegates voted 93-44 on Friday to give final approval to the bill, sending it to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who said he will sign it. The Senate passed the bill last week. "While the state was investing more and more, the counties were investing less and less," O'Malley said Friday.
NEWS
By David R. Craig | June 20, 2012
Recently, Harford County engaged in a public conversation with its teachers about pay and classroom spending. This problem is not unique to Harford County and is symptomatic of a statewide problem caused by increased state mandates, lack of control over educational spending by the county's funding authorities and increased strain on public dollars in a down economy. On one side was the Harford County Education Association (HCEA), which represents the interests of teachers. They bemoaned that a county that is already spending half of every general fund dollar on K-12 education (this includes operating spending, debt service and other capital expenditures)
NEWS
March 28, 2007
In an editorial yesterday, a reference to $6.1 billion in next year's budget should have included all education spending, not only for the No Child Left Behind law.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Maryland counties will face a loss of tax revenue if they fail to keep up their required levels of education spending under a deal agreed to by the Maryland House and Senate. The House Ways and Means Committee decided last night to accept the Senate version of a bill to enforce what is known as the state's "maintenance of effort" rule -- essentially a requirement that counties keep up their education spending to match increases in state aid. The vote in the panel was 12-5, along party lines, an indication the bill will have little difficulty passing in the full House.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
Rep. Andy Harris said Thursday that he will request an expanded review of the Maryland Department of Education's use of federal funds after an audit found that the state may have to return up to $540,000 in misspent stimulus dollars and money designated for poor children. Harris, a Baltimore County Republican, said he will use his seat on the House Appropriations subcommittee that oversees the U.S. Department of Education's budget to press for greater scrutiny. "What it uncovered is a pattern of waste, fraud and abuse of federal tax dollars," Harris said of the audit.
NEWS
By George Liebmann | September 24, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley has taken on the road to Charlotte, N.C., and to Iowa his claim that Maryland's schools are "Number One. " The annual ratings by Education Week are held to justify the hundreds of millions in additional Thornton Commission spending that are at the root of state and local budget problems. These funds have been squandered on the rapidly escalating costs of "Cadillac" health insurance policies for teachers and on lockstep seniority increases not accorded other public and private work forces — while the state maintains certification requirements of 30 credit hours of mind-numbing education courses that exclude about 95 percent of its college graduates from the public teaching force.
NEWS
By David R. Craig | June 20, 2012
Recently, Harford County engaged in a public conversation with its teachers about pay and classroom spending. This problem is not unique to Harford County and is symptomatic of a statewide problem caused by increased state mandates, lack of control over educational spending by the county's funding authorities and increased strain on public dollars in a down economy. On one side was the Harford County Education Association (HCEA), which represents the interests of teachers. They bemoaned that a county that is already spending half of every general fund dollar on K-12 education (this includes operating spending, debt service and other capital expenditures)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
The General Assembly has approved a tough new law that will require Maryland's counties and Baltimore to keep up a minimum level of education spending or risk having the state withhold part of their annual tax collections and ship the money directly to local school boards. The House of Delegates voted 93-44 on Friday to give final approval to the bill, sending it to Gov. Martin O'Malley, who said he will sign it. The Senate passed the bill last week. "While the state was investing more and more, the counties were investing less and less," O'Malley said Friday.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Maryland counties will face a loss of tax revenue if they fail to keep up their required levels of education spending under a deal agreed to by the Maryland House and Senate. The House Ways and Means Committee decided last night to accept the Senate version of a bill to enforce what is known as the state's "maintenance of effort" rule -- essentially a requirement that counties keep up their education spending to match increases in state aid. The vote in the panel was 12-5, along party lines, an indication the bill will have little difficulty passing in the full House.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
A recent letter writer proclaims that "anyone who claims to be concerned about the deficit and doesn't want to raise taxes is either a fool or a fraud" ("Taxes and the deficit," April 8). With all due respect, our current national debt is over $14 trillion, an amount that equates to more than $45,000 for every living American man, woman and child. Our debt is crushing, and America's children are at risk. We're well beyond just raising taxes, and just raising taxes alone won't get us anywhere near where we need to be in the coming decades.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | April 7, 2009
State lawmakers have backed off a budget provision that called for freezing part of the landmark Thornton education funding plan in future years. A cross-chamber conference committee made the decision Monday after a legislative analyst said the move might jeopardize federal stimulus funding, which requires that states maintain certain levels of spending. Lawmakers are negotiating the final details of the nearly $14 billion annual operating budget and companion legislation that the General Assembly must adopt before it adjourns in a week.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Montgomery County senators won key changes last night to the Thornton Commission's recommendations for increased school funding, potentially clearing a major hurdle to approval of the legislation. Two Senate committees agreed to change the proposed school funding formula to give the county an extra $80 million annually within five years. Overall, the Thornton plan would go from $1.1 billion a year to almost $1.3 billion. "It certainly meets our needs," said Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan.
NEWS
By Yash Gupta | February 21, 2011
President Barack Obama's heart was in the right place when he made his Valentine's Day visit to a technology middle school in Parkville. Yet even as the president sought to encourage investment in education, the new spending plans of both the administration and House Republicans spell bad news for America's role as a knowledge and innovation leader. Maybe the word hasn't reached everyone in Washington, but the global innovation sweepstakes is definitely on, and the competition is brutal.
NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | January 18, 2011
Maryland spends on public education like a Saudi prince in Tiffany's. According to an analysis of data from the Annual Survey of State Government Finances from the U.S. Census Bureau, all education spending accounted for 47 percent of Maryland's total revenue in 2009, the most recent year available. Health spending, which is always cited as the monster in the state budget, ate 9 percent of total revenue in 2009. By comparison, public education represented 26 percent of total revenue in 2000.
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