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NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | April 8, 1993
A settlement aimed at improving special education services for young prison inmates with learning disabilities was reached yesterday between the state and lawyers for a group of inmates.The agreement, approved by the state Board of Public Works in Annapolis, could extend such services to perhaps 300 inmates but does not specify additional funding.Currently, there are about 1,200 inmates under the age of 22 in Maryland prisons. Of those, 80 to 100 receive special education, according to the state Division of Correction.
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NEWS
February 1, 2013
VA outpatient clinic The Department of Veterans Affairs has opened a new 13,300-square-foot facility to serve veterans in Anne Arundel and Howard counties. The clinic is located at 2479 Fifth St. adjacent to the Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center at Fort Meade. Services include general outpatient medical care, preventive health and education services, various medical screenings, TeleHealth services and referrals to specialized programs and inpatient services available throughout the VA Medical Health Care System.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1998
Ending a quarter marked by a major acquisition and strong performances in all three of its divisions, Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. yesterday reported earnings growth of 36 percent from continuing operations.Sylvan's earnings per share rose to 15 cents for the second quarter that ended June 30, up from 11 cents in the same period a year ago.The figure for this year's second quarter excludes $9 million in costs related to its acquisition of San Francisco-based ASPECT Inc., which tutors foreign students in English.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
Calvert School, the private, pre-kindergarten through eighth grade day school in North Baltimore, announced Wednesday that it has sold its more than 100-year-old distance learning business to a private equity firm. The terms of the sale of Calvert Education Services to an investment group led by the Baltimore-based Camden Partners Holdings LLC were not disclosed. "It has a wonderful reputation as a real leader in both home schooling and online education," said David Warnock, Camden Partners' chairman.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2000
A funny thing happened to Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. on the way to becoming a big company: The Baltimore-based education services company decided not to be one. After an appraisal that started last year while investors pounded Sylvan stock, three options occurred to Douglas Becker, the company's chairman and chief executive officer. Sylvan could commit to being a conventional, large company, putting it under endless pressure to increase earnings every year; go private, removing it from Wall Street's demands; or, make a more radical shift by selling some assets and becoming an investor itself.
NEWS
January 30, 1991
The Baltimore Sun Education Services Department is sponsoring a "No Textbook Day" workshop designed to provide teachers with innovative ways of using the newspaper with their students during Newspaper in Education Week, March 4 through 8.Both workshops will be conducted from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Baltimore Sun building at 501 N. CalvertSt. in Baltimore.Information: Lauren Vanhoy, Baltimore Sun Education Services Manager, 332-6230 or toll-free, 1-800-829-8000, Ext. 6230.
NEWS
By E. B. Furgurson and E. B. Furgurson,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 14, 1999
Anne Arundel public schools special education chief Colleen Wilson held an informational meeting for parents at school headquarters on Riva Road last night to explain potential widespread changes to the special education program.Ten parents of the more than 10,000 students receiving special education services attended.On Tuesday night, no parents showed up for a similar hearing at the Old Mill High School auditorium. The only people present were two staffers from the Board of Education, District 2 Councilman Daniel E. Klosterman, District 1 Councilwoman Pamela G. Beidle and two reporters.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
Baltimore-based Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. yesterday reported record revenue and profit for its first quarter and also announced a five-month contract with the Los Angeles area school district that has a potential value of $1.5 million.Sylvan said it earned $5.6 million, or 18 cents per share, for the quarter that ended March 31, a 65 percent jump from the $3.4 million, or 13 cents per share, it earned for the same three months a year ago.The per-share profit of 18 cents met the consensus estimate of seven analysts according to Nelson Information Inc. and beat by a penny the consensus estimate of 17 cents circulated by First Call, an earnings forecasting service embraced by most Wall Street analysts.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. met or bettered investment analysts' expectations yesterday with its revenue outlook for the year and also learned that a windfall from Washington is all but on the way. The sweeping $26 billion education bill that President Bush signed into law at an Ohio public school yesterday includes assistance for private tutoring for students in failing schools and teacher development - among areas served by the Baltimore-based education...
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Buoyed by growth in its contract education services division, Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. reported yesterday record revenue and earnings for its third quarter.The Baltimore-based education company's net income for the three months that ended Sept. 30 was $12.9 million, or 26 cents per diluted share, up 74 percent from $7.4 million, or 16 cents a share, in the third quarter of 1997.Although each of Sylvan's business divisions grew substantially, contract education services led the way.Revenue climbed 61 percent to $15.9 million.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | October 25, 2012
In 2008, Paul Tough's first book, “Whatever It Takes,” told the story of the Harlem Children's Zone, a massive effort to leverage a pre-birth-through-high-school system of education services to change the trajectory of 10,000 children in one 97-block area. In his new best-seeling book, “How Children Succeed” - recently praised by commentators ranging from conservative David Brooks to liberal Nicholas Kristof - Mr. Tough examines the lifelong impacts of stress during childhood and the noncognitive skills, like grit and curiosity, that could help mitigate early learning deficits.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
I am a parent of two children that have received the tutoring services provided by Baltimore City Public Schools. Both of my children have IEP learning plans from lead poisoning. These services have the helped my children and allowed my son to secure a position in the high school of his choice. I would hate for the funding to go to the school districts instead of the children of Baltimore City where the services are desperately needed ("Fund classrooms, not corporations," March 27). Please do not take away the supplemental educational services tutoring program.
NEWS
By Catherine Pugh and Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr | March 22, 2012
The Maryland Department of Education is about to make a very big mistake. Under the Education and Secondary Education Act (better known as No Child Left Behind), low-income families whose children attend low-performing schools are eligible to receive supplemental educational services outside of the regular school day. These services include after school tutorial services. The Supplemental Educational Services Program is federally funded through Title I. Tutorial services can be provided by private companies that are preferred providers approved by the MSDE.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 16, 2007
Joseph B. Williams, former aide to three Baltimore County public schools superintendents and a founder of Alternatives Unlimited, a national educational services company, died of complications from diabetes at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Pikesville resident was 72. Born in Gettysburg, Pa., Mr. Williams moved to Baltimore, where he attended Douglass High School. He earned his General Educational Development certificate while serving in the Army Transportation Corps from 1957 to 1959.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
Maryland and the U.S. Department of Justice have reached a settlement agreement to improve conditions at the troubled Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, the state's juvenile services secretary said yesterday. Secretary Donald W. DeVore said that the one-year pact, signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley last week, helps the state avoid a federal lawsuit. The U.S. Department of Justice sharply criticized the center's management and staffing in a recent review. "This avoids any litigation and is a good-faith commitment on the part of the state and on the part of DOJ that, with the right leadership, we can get these things done," DeVore said in a phone interview.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | April 6, 2007
When Doug and Carole Bruns look around their neat, blue-walled gallery space on Main Street in Ellicott City, they see more than a showplace for photographs. The newly opened f64 gallery is the Fulton couple's latest joint venture, their "empty nest" project and the fulfillment of a longtime desire of Doug Bruns to delve more deeply into fine-art photography. It is also a way to raise money for a foundation they started, which funds efforts to send young people from the United States to other countries for educational and public service projects.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
The Howard Soil Conservation District is accepting nominations for its "Conservation Teacher of the Year" awards program.The competition is opened to full-time teachers working at the kindergarten through high school level who have developed an outstanding program of conservation education.The winner will receive $1,000 in cash and an expense-paid trip to Reno, Nev., for the 1992 annual convention of the National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD).The national second-place winner will receive a $500 cash award and the first-place regional winner in each of seven areas will receive $200.
NEWS
March 21, 1997
CHARLES C. FEAGA, the Howard County councilman, went way overboard when he accused the county school system of spending so much on special education that it has become a magnet for families with learning-disabled children.That is utter nonsense.For one thing, there is nothing to indicate that children with special education needs are flocking in great numbers to Howard County. About 10 percent of the county's 39,000 public school children receive special education services -- compared with the state and national averages of 12 percent.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
Schools comments need clarification A letter published in The Sun on Jan. 21, "Story focus skews debate on schools," made some egregious statements about special education students and their parents that need to be corrected or clarified. Fact: Special education IS expensive- expensive because interventions are based on specialized, individualized programs and services as necessary to meet the special needs of individual students. However, it's not discretionary spending for school systems - it's the law. Congress passed the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
NEWS
By JORGE VALENCIA and JORGE VALENCIA,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
Although Howard County will face limited impact from the Pentagon's military base realignment, local government is moving to make sure the county is prepared for what some economists forecast would be the biggest defense-related beef-up in the region since World War II. About 1,000 new homes are expected to be built in Howard County in the next decade because of the Pentagon's base re-shuffling, according to a draft Towson University study that predicts...
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