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By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
Howard County Council member Charles C. Feaga, the west county Republican known for his candor, said yesterday that county schools should reduce special education instruction and suggested Howard schools suffer because they attract too many disabled students from other counties."
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NEWS
August 28, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial ( "Time to talk teacher tenure," Aug. 23) is a colorful piece, full of red herrings and false premises. But let's get at least one thing straight: tenure should not and does not mean "guaranteed employment. " It simply means that an educator has the right to a fair hearing and investigation rather than being summarily fired because of an ultimately false accusation, because they chose to speak out on behalf of their students or because someone disagrees with a teacher's decision to teach, say, evolution.
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NEWS
February 8, 2012
In his article, "School choice is a fact, but who chooses?" Robert Maranto grossly misinterpreted the educational philosophy and performance of Joshua Wheeler. Mr. Wheeler was superintendent of schools in Baltimore County from 1970 to 1976. Mr. Maranto quoted Mr. Wheeler as saying: "The purpose of public education is to provide an education for those few who want it. " If Mr. Wheeler actually said this, it was certainly taken out of context and contrary to his performance as an outstanding school administrator.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Last year, Elm Creative Arts School in Milwaukee failed to live up to its name. A gallery for student artwork had become a storage area and meeting space. The performance space, dubbed the "great room" with theater-style seating, was used as an alternative route to cut down on hallway traffic. The only arts class students regularly attended was dance. The school's divergence from its mission reflected a time that Milwaukee Superintendent Gregory Thornton says students across Milwaukee's public schools were being "starved" of an educational staple.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 7, 2012
Hannah More School, a private school for children with autism and other emotional and learning disabilities, is becoming a part of Sheppard Pratt Health System. Officials with Hannah More said merging with the state's largest provider of mental health and special education therapeutic services would allow it to better serve its students. Financial details of the deal, effective Nov. 1, were not disclosed. The Reisterstown school will keep its name, operate under the same school leadership and remain at its current locations under the deal.   The main campus has been located in Reisterstown since 1978, serving students from sixth to 12 th grade with autism, Asperger syndrome and other learning disabilities.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial ( "Time to talk teacher tenure," Aug. 23) is a colorful piece, full of red herrings and false premises. But let's get at least one thing straight: tenure should not and does not mean "guaranteed employment. " It simply means that an educator has the right to a fair hearing and investigation rather than being summarily fired because of an ultimately false accusation, because they chose to speak out on behalf of their students or because someone disagrees with a teacher's decision to teach, say, evolution.
NEWS
By Matthew Robinson | June 12, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Another month, another standardized-test cheating scandal. Principal Karen Karch stepped down May 31 after teachers in her Montgomery County school were caught helping fifth-graders cheat on statewide tests. Before then, her school, Potomac Elementary, was considered one of Maryland's best. Teachers and principals are supposed to be role models for students, not partners in crime. But such man-bites-dog-stories are becoming all too frequent. Similar cheating scandals made headlines in New York City and Los Angeles earlier this year.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
The Baltimore County school board wants its money back -- the $50,000 it has spent since July defending the school system against a lawsuit brought by parents and organizations opposed to changes in its special education programs.A federal judge dismissed the suit last month and the plaintiffs decided soon thereafter to drop the suit.The board says it has a "fiscal responsibility" to act. Last week, the U.S. District Court in Baltimore approved the board's request to recover legal fees from the Washington, D.C., law firm that represented the families and organizations.
NEWS
December 11, 2005
Board of Education to meet Wednesday The Carroll County Board of Education will meet at 5 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices, 125 N. Court St., Westminster. The regular meeting agenda will be posted on the school system's Web site at carrollk12.org. Meetings will be broadcast live on CETV, Channel 21 on Adelphia cable TV, and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sunday and the following Thursday, and 9 a.m. Saturday. Information: 410-751-3020. Physical therapy class to graduate Carroll Community College will graduate its Physical Therapist Assistant class of 19 students in a ceremony at 2 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1994
Blasted repeatedly for not communicating changes in special education programs, Baltimore County educators went on the offensive Wednesday, announcing that plans are being made to add another 18 in-school programs for children with disabilities next year.The programs would accommodate 100 to 150 students who need the most intense services, known as Level or Intensity 5, in 16 neighborhood schools. Each program would be offered in a "self-contained" classroom of six to nine students. That means that youngsters with disabilities would be segregated for academics, but would join nondisabled students for lunch, assemblies and perhaps special subjects, such as music and physical education.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Cameras that stream live to police stations and patrol cars, new entry systems in all schools and a state-of-the-art visitor identification system are part of a $3.7 million plan unveiled Tuesday to improve security in Baltimore County public schools. "We have no greater responsibility as leaders than to protect our children when they go to school each and every day," said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz in announcing the proposal at a news conference in Towson, where he was joined by Superintendent Dallas Dance, Police Chief Jim Johnson and County Council members.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
While most children see dream jobs, spouses and freedom in their futures, Brian Bailey saw only death. The autistic boy, who stopped speaking at 18 months, grew up with anxiety about getting older, and his rocky educational track record early on didn't allay his fears. "I was obsessing from the beginning about his future, asking 'What am I going to do?' " said his mother, Jennell Bailey, as she recalled his one week in a Baltimore public school general-education classroom, where she said he wasn't flourishing.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 7, 2012
Hannah More School, a private school for children with autism and other emotional and learning disabilities, is becoming a part of Sheppard Pratt Health System. Officials with Hannah More said merging with the state's largest provider of mental health and special education therapeutic services would allow it to better serve its students. Financial details of the deal, effective Nov. 1, were not disclosed. The Reisterstown school will keep its name, operate under the same school leadership and remain at its current locations under the deal.   The main campus has been located in Reisterstown since 1978, serving students from sixth to 12 th grade with autism, Asperger syndrome and other learning disabilities.
NEWS
By Kimberly R. Moftitt | July 16, 2012
With the season of celebration over and many of our school-age children of various grade levels officially "promoted," it seems like a good time to sit back and ask: Why? Specifically, why are promotion ceremonies at the arbitrary grades of pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, fifth grade and eighth grade even necessary? And after a simple review of the recently released MSA scores, it appears even more apt that a major shift in our educational culture occurs for there is little to celebrate.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | May 30, 2012
As the heat index crept toward the 90-degree mark Tuesday morning, Baltimore city social studies teacher Ejaz Baluch watched his students at ConneXions School for the Arts begin to fade. By 11 a.m., when the heat index had risen to 93 degrees, the school called the system's headquarters to see if it would be exercising its longstanding policy to dismiss school if the index reached 90 degrees by 11 a.m.  Teachers across the city began to complain from their sweltering classrooms after they hadn't heard from the school system by midafternoon.
NEWS
February 8, 2012
In his article, "School choice is a fact, but who chooses?" Robert Maranto grossly misinterpreted the educational philosophy and performance of Joshua Wheeler. Mr. Wheeler was superintendent of schools in Baltimore County from 1970 to 1976. Mr. Maranto quoted Mr. Wheeler as saying: "The purpose of public education is to provide an education for those few who want it. " If Mr. Wheeler actually said this, it was certainly taken out of context and contrary to his performance as an outstanding school administrator.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
Under pressure from the U.S. Department of Education, the Baltimore County school system has agreed to move as many of its severely disabled students as possible out of special schools and into regular classrooms over the next 2 1/2 years.Acting on a civil rights complaint by a parents' group, the federal education agency ruled that the county is in violation of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 by failing to educate many of its handicapped students in "the least restrictive environment."In a reply signed by School Superintendent Stuart Berger, the county agreed to review the cases of 580 students at three of the county's special education schools: Battle Monument, Rolling Road and The Ridge School.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
Caitlin Krebs wants to teach in Baltimore City. Money isn't terribly important to the Westminster native, an early childhood education major at the University of Maryland, College Park. She wants to work where she feels most needed. But Krebs and other future educators are nervous about the prospects of a new teacher contract in Baltimore and about the national reform movement encapsulated by the Race to the Top for federal funding. They know they're more likely than their predecessors to be judged on the test scores of their students.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | June 20, 2011
Harford County schools are among the top in the nation, with two high schools honored in the Newsweek's list of the top 1,500 public schools in the United States. There are also 17 private schools in the county. Harford Community College is the region's only two-year community college, serving more than 8,000 students annually. Harford County Public Schools serves more than 38,000 students with 32 elementary schools, nine middle schools and 10 high schools including one technical high school.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
A 6-year-old special-needs student was in serious condition after he fell out of the back of a moving school bus Wednesday afternoon, city schools and Baltimore County police said Thursday. Baltimore County paramedics responded to the incident shortly after 3 p.m. Wednesday, where they found the injured boy after he fell off a bus that was taking him to his West Baltimore home from a Baltimore County special-education school. The student was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he remains in serious condition, according to Lt. Rob McCullough, spokesman for the Baltimore County Police Department.
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