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NEWS
October 17, 2013
Common Core is the "New Coke" of education reform. The propaganda tells us that it is "more rigorous" and "deeper," but parents are getting a taste of it now and it is not as good as what we had in Howard County. There is no independent research or empirical evidence to back up the claims that Common Core is a better way to teach. Common Core has been found by many child clinical psychologists to be developmental inappropriate for children in the elementary grades. It asks children to think in ways that their developing brains are not yet capable of doing.
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NEWS
By Michael Corbin | December 30, 2013
"Why do no white kids go to school here?" A 14-year-old ninth-grader asked me this question earlier this semester about the school she attends and where I teach. Smart and genuinely curious, she asked the question without any of that world-weary irony and moral casuistry that often attends questions from teenagers and, more generally, questions about school segregation in present day America. More, her question was not shaded with the language of inequality or achievement gaps or school reforms or global competitiveness.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
As the school year finally gets under way, public school students across the state will be writing more often and learning to think differently in math class, as the state begins major education reforms that will change everything from the curriculum to the way teachers are evaluated. While some of the changes — which districts agreed to make in exchange for more federal funding — have faced resistance from teachers, others have already been embraced in classrooms. Baltimore City has tried a number of the most radical reforms as it attempted to turn around its perpetually poor-performing schools.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
Common Core is the "New Coke" of education reform. The propaganda tells us that it is "more rigorous" and "deeper," but parents are getting a taste of it now and it is not as good as what we had in Howard County. There is no independent research or empirical evidence to back up the claims that Common Core is a better way to teach. Common Core has been found by many child clinical psychologists to be developmental inappropriate for children in the elementary grades. It asks children to think in ways that their developing brains are not yet capable of doing.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Baltimore lands in the middle of the pack among other large cities undergoing education reform, according to a study released Tuesday. A resistant teachers union and lack of a quality control are among the obstacles the district has to overcome to continue making progress, the study says. In a report published by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, "America's Best (and Worst) Cities for School Reform," Baltimore ranked 17th out of 26 of large cities that have the supports in place for education reform.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 6, 1997
Also in yesterday's Maryland section, an article incorrectly named one of the technology partners with the Maryland State Department of Education. AT&T Corp. is participating in the effort to provide a Web site for each school system.The Sun regrets the errors.Maryland became the first state yesterday to answer President Clinton's "Call to Action" for education when U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley, Gov. Parris N. Glendening and state school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick signed the state's nine-point program for continuing education reform.
NEWS
By Christopher T. Cross | March 18, 1999
SOME very interesting things are happening in terms of education policy here and nationwide. In Maryland, the State Board of Education's recent move to toughen standards for new teachers is indicative of those changes.In conjunction with such reforms, many parents are less wed to the concept of local control of schools. Instead, they are intensely interested in how the quality of education in their children's schools compares with schools in other states and even other nations.They realize that, in our mobile society, their children are likely to move several times in their careers, putting them in competition with people from various states and countries.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 3, 1998
A town meeting on education reform that is expected to draw national and local leaders will be held at 4 p.m. tomorrow at Gilman School."Urban Education in Crisis: Challenges and Choices" is sponsored by Gilman in partnership with Roland Park Elementary/Middle School.The meeting will be held in the Alumni Auditorium on the boys' school campus at 5407 Roland Ave. Tickets are $25.The forum is the third in a series sponsored by Gilman in celebration of its 100th anniversary.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke will join state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and interim Baltimore schools chief Robert Schiller and other local educators at the symposium.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | April 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - My wife is sitting on a gold mine, I tell her. She's a part-time creative writing teacher in a District of Columbia public high school. She comes home with stories more shocking, poignant, bizarre, scandalous and hilarious than I have ever seen on Boston Public and other TV dramas about the traumas of high school. I was particularly touched by what she heard one day from a 16-year-old girl from "Southeast," which is how Washingtonians refer to the poorest section of town. "Ms. Page, you come to every class, don't you?"
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2001
Maryland's Republican caucus unveiled a five-part plan for education reform yesterday that's part George W. Bush and part Kathleen Kennedy Townsend. Assembled in one of Baltimore's five "quasi-charter" schools, the GOP senators and delegates offered a Maryland version of President Bush's plan to give vouchers to parents of children who attend failing schools. "It's about giving the parents a choice of where to send their children once their school has failed," said Sen. Andrew P. Harris of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Robert Small, the Howard County parent whose name became known from Maine to California when he protested new nationwide education standards, is part of a chorus of increasingly strident voices rising up against the initiative - from both ends of the political spectrum. The far right believes standards known as the Common Core will mean federal control of schools and a chance for the government to collect reams of information about every child, perhaps even fingerprinting them. Joining them from the far left are a group of parents and education advocates who are opposed to standardized testing in schools.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The University of Maryland University College expects to be among the first wave of schools this academic year awarding transfer credit to those who have taken - and can prove they learned from - certain "massive open online courses," known as MOOCs. The school, which targets working adults with its own online classes, and six others nationwide have agreed to track student progress as part of a research study gauging how well the MOOCs, which are relatively new to the education world, prepared the transfers for a more traditional learning experience.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | August 22, 2013
While those in the education world are gearing up for a whirlwind of public education reforms this school year, the general public either don't know or disapprove of the most significant ones that will impact teachers and students here in Maryland, and across the nation. According to an annual survey of the public's attitude toward education, two out of three people had never heard of the new Common Core Standards, which will overhaul curricula in more than 40 states this year.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
Saturday's "your turn" pieces on education reform ("The fallacy of reform" and "Diversity, choice key for schools," May 18) did not seem to address Baltimore City schools' educational history nor requirements in a practical, yet considerate way. Schools CEO Andrés Alonso cut the staff at headquarters, then used the space to benefit at-risk students. He built consensus to achieve improved attendance, test scores, and graduation rates. Additionally, why do some live in the past and complain schools are crumbling?
NEWS
May 6, 2013
Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso's resignation at the end of this academic year is a major blow to a city whose trajectory he helped change. There can be little doubt that the energetic and rapid reforms he implemented in the city's long-struggling school system have set the stage for broader renewal and growth in Baltimore. But city leaders also need to look on his departure as a tremendous opportunity, a chance to bring in a new superintendent who will build on Mr. Alonso's successes.
EXPLORE
By Dan Singer | February 13, 2013
Prince George's County Executive Rushern Baker III wasted no time in telling attendees of his third and final fiscal year 2014 budget hearing that it will be a "very difficult budget year across the county. " With a $152.2 million deficit projected for 2014, Baker told community members at Laurel High School Tuesday night that he will need to have "tough discussions" and make some "hard decisions" in the coming weeks. A fiscal year 2014 budget forecast from December 2012 estimates the county will have slightly more than $2.8 billion in expenditures and receive about $2.65 billion in revenue.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1999
Maryland officials have met at least twice with representatives of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in their effort to persuade the nation's largest private philanthropy to help support the state's education reform effort.State officials disclosed yesterday that Gov. Parris N. Glendening met with the Gates foundation last month when he visited Seattle after a trade mission to South America. Last week, state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and Glendening's chief of staff, Major F. Riddick Jr., met with foundation officials in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 24, 2002
OF ALL THE disservices inflicted upon Baltimore schoolchildren, social promotion ranks among the cruelest. It's the reason you can walk into ninth-grade classrooms and listen to kids stumble and stammer over third-grade words. The reason basic math principles must be revisited in algebra courses. The reason a diploma from a city high school can't always be equated with knowledge or achievement. We cheered two years ago when the city school board declared an end to social promotion and demanded that kids who fail make up their work in summer school or repeat a grade the next year.
EXPLORE
March 19, 2012
I had a number of reasons for suspending my campaign for the District 1 seat on thePrince George's CountyBoard of Education. But high on that list is my regard for Zabrina Epps. After meeting her and talking with her at some length, I realized that we shared a similar vision for education, both the global, big-picture view of education, as well as what is needed at the local, classroom level. That includes a vision of a school system without barriers, infused with a culture of achievement and held to high standards of transparency and meaningful, two-way communication with families.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
As the school year finally gets under way, public school students across the state will be writing more often and learning to think differently in math class, as the state begins major education reforms that will change everything from the curriculum to the way teachers are evaluated. While some of the changes — which districts agreed to make in exchange for more federal funding — have faced resistance from teachers, others have already been embraced in classrooms. Baltimore City has tried a number of the most radical reforms as it attempted to turn around its perpetually poor-performing schools.
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