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Erica L. Green | April 17, 2012
New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who made national headlines last year when he made a rare move for an elected official and donated $30 million of his own money to programs for underserved black and Latino youth in New York City, has spread his wealth and commitment to Baltimore.  Bloomberg, who visited the city last week, donated $5 million to the Open Society Institute-Baltimore, the organization announced, for a new education program that...
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
A glance at Chesapeake Arts Center's upcoming schedule indicates an exciting season beginning in September, with entertainment to attract audiences with diverse tastes in music, theater and star attractions. Chesapeake recently received $20,000 through a community grant from Maryland Live casino, and executive director Belinda Fraley Huesman has big plans to broaden CAC's revitalization. That effort began in earnest in November, when Chesapeake's Studio 194 Theatre in Brooklyn Park hosted Bay Theatre Company's Wine and Words reading of "Love, Loss and What I Wore," drawing an overflow audience.
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NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2004
Cecil Community College has expanded its education preparation programs in order to help address the growing shortage of qualified teachers in Maryland. "The state is not producing enough teachers to fulfill its needs," said William Denbrock, director of educational programs and lifelong learning at CCC. "The problem is that the state colleges and universities are filled to capacity and unable to accept students." Because of a lack of educators, Maryland schools are being forced to hire from outside of the state, he said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Two of Maryland's teacher preparation programs were ranked among the best in the country in the second annual report released today by a national research advocacy group. The National Council on Teacher Quality ranked McDaniel College 19th best in the country in preparing teachers for elementary grades; the Johns Hopkins University came in 22nd. "We are delighted to hear that NCTQ has ranked McDaniel's undergraduate elementary education program among the best in the nation," said Cheryl Knauer, director of media relations for the college.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
Tara Dawn Holland, the reigning Miss America, visited the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women in Jessup yesterday to promote an education program for inmates."
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 23, 2007
Every year, Maryland schools face a persistent challenge: finding teachers to educate the thousands of children coming through their doors. Even with recruits from other states, career-changers and retired educators returning to fill vacancies, many systems are looking to themselves - and their students - for a solution. They have adopted the budding Teacher Academy of Maryland, a career and technology education program that introduces classes about teaching into high schools. "We've taken care of every career in the universe except our own," said Marjorie Lohnes, supervisor of career and technology education for Carroll County, where students can take classes for future jobs in health, engineering and fashion, among other fields.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
Howard Community College's continuing education program is one of the best in North America, according to independent consultants who audited the department. Learning Resources Network, the largest nonprofit organization focusing on continuing education, studied HCC's Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development for six months and pronounced it an "outstanding program." "There were lots of positive things," Gregory Marsello, the nonprofit's vice president for organizational development, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
Howard County's popular career and technology program is undergoing another transformation as it strives to meet the evolving needs of students and the work force. In an effort to provide more access and equity, the school system is preparing a comprehensive academy-style career and technology education program that would provide courses at all 12 high schools next year and at the Applications and Research Laboratory in Ellicott City. As a result, this year's sophomore class is the last one participating in the technology magnet program being phased out at Long Reach and River Hill high schools.
NEWS
March 14, 2010
Volunteers 21 and older who pass a background check are needed at the Jennifer Road Detention Center to work in the library, assist with pre-GED classes and the education program, facilitate self-help workshops on parenting, job readiness, financial issues and more. Training is provided. The education program is held Wednesday and Thursday evenings; self-help workshop scheduling is flexible. Call 410-222-7093 or e-mail dcmcdo01@aacounty.org.
NEWS
By Mary Tillar | February 24, 2008
Over the past month, the Anne Arundel County school system has received many e-mails about the special education program for students with emotional disabilities at Chesapeake High School. Many have expressed concern that students enrolled in the Chesapeake Regional Program (CRP), which operates in a wing at Chesapeake High School, pose a safety danger for students in the high school's general education population. It is evident from recent public comments that misperceptions still exist.
NEWS
By Adina Amith | May 5, 2014
When my daughter was a freshman in high school, she shared a particularly uplifting experience from history class one day. In the middle of a lesson, a senior barged into the classroom with tears in his eyes and handed the teacher a letter. A smile spread across the teacher's face as he read in silence. The teacher then turned to the class and announced that the student had just received a full scholarship to an excellent college. The teen pointed toward the window and whispered, to the teacher, "If it hadn't been for you and this school, I'd be out on those streets selling drugs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Patricia R. Amass, a retired Carroll County educator and volunteer who focused her efforts on those living in Third World countries, died Monday of abdominal cancer at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. She was 78. "Pat defined the statement of what a professional colleague and a dedicated teacher is. We need more educators in this world who had her sort of dedication," said Francis "Skip" Fennell, professor of education at McDaniel College and a friend of nearly 40 years.
NEWS
By Matthew Coile | April 15, 2014
Maryland home education policy needs to be updated to give it more flexibility, to the benefit of all students. Current policy requires that students take either all of their classes or none of them at public school, which means homeschool students like myself cannot enroll in the public school classes that our parents have paid for in taxes. Administrators and teachers have told me they would be glad to invite me to take classes such as biology or band at their schools, but they cannot due to current policy - policy that doesn't even make sense to them.
NEWS
December 30, 2013
Edie Manney's thoughtful op-ed on Head Start ( "Head Start helps children and parents," Dec.25) should be mandatory reading for all legislators and think tank gurus. Too many policymakers and social science researchers look at Head Start as only an education program; test scores of four year olds are taken to be the sole criterion of Head Start's effectiveness. Ms. Manney's story shows how Head Start's multiple services - parent involvement and support, health care, nutrition, child development and more - are effective in strengthening families and providing genuine economic opportunities.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
The Baltimore Department of Social Services on Monday pledged a comprehensive review of alternative education programs for foster children, after revelations that it paid $40,000 to send students to a school in Philadelphia where they obtained a diploma in one day. The Crooked Places Made Straight Academy, where 80 youths from Baltimore took a three-hour exam to obtain a Pennsylvania high school diploma, shut down its one-day program Friday after...
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Help at detention center Volunteers 21 and older who pass a background check are needed at the Jennifer Road Detention Center to work in the library, assist with pre-GED classes and the education program, facilitate self-help workshops on parenting, job readiness, financial issues and more. Training is provided. The education program is held Wednesday and Thursday evenings; self-help workshop scheduling is flexible. Information: 410-222-7093 or dcmcdo01@aacounty.org . Patapsco Valley State Park The park seeks volunteers for a variety of positions, including bike and mounted patrols, maintenance and management of campsites, trail work, gardening, Visitor/Nature Center staffing and volunteer rangers.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 12, 2006
A few weeks ago, I dialed a phone number for a certain State Department of Education program in a state prison. I identified myself to the state employee who answered the phone and made a simple request. I asked for the full, official name of the program, along with a brief description of the program, and I'm pretty sure I said "please." You'd have thought I was asking how to make a dirty bomb. Officer Whistle-blower's termination hearing is postponed. pg 4b
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Each week, The Baltimore Sun publishes a Q&A with an area college lacrosse player to help you become more acquainted with the player and his/her team. Today's guest is Loyola defender Ashley Moulton, a fourth-year starter from Rochester, N.Y. A key component in a defense holding opponents to 9.45 goals per game, Moulton is preparing for the No. 20 Greyhounds' critical four-game road swing in Big East play beginning at undefeated and No. 5 Notre Dame on Friday night. An elementary education major, Moulton will return to Baltimore in the fall to complete her student teaching before following in the footsteps of her mother, Diane Moulton, working with autistic children.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
At Germantown Elementary School in Annapolis, students receive physical education once a week. Officially, that is. Unofficially, students are engaging in the same level of activity as their "go-outside-and-play" parents of previous generations. At recess, before classes and after school — and in some cases even during classroom instruction — youngsters are getting workouts by playing traditional games, learning new ones and creating their own spinoff versions. Germantown Elementary is among the first schools in the area to implement a San Diego-based physical education program called SPARK, which stresses to children the importance of physical fitness, then provides grade-level equipment and instruction to back it up. SPARK officials said the program began in 1989 as a result of a study supported by the Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health and San Diego State University.
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