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By Andrew J. Glass | September 8, 1992
THE kids head back to school in search of an education. The candidates head out on the road in search of votes. What better time to show your election-year skills? Here's a quiz that points the way:Question 1: As a nation, we plan to spend some $445 billion on education this year. The 1980s were a time when tax rates fell while greed ran wild. So how much did spending on education go up during the decade?The answer is 40 percent. Give yourself a bonus if you knew an even better answer, uttered last week by Education Secretary Lamar Alexander: "These figures remind us that money alone is not the answer to better schools."
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NEWS
July 10, 2014
It's heartening that Baltimore City's new schools CEO, Gregory Thornton, has made limiting the number of out-of-school suspensions for the system's youngest children a priority in his first weeks on the job. In doing so he has sent a strong signal to principals and teachers that they need to find alternative methods for disciplining troublesome or disruptive students and that kicking kids out of school is rarely effective and should only be used as...
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NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Liz Bowie and Bradley Olson and Liz Bowie,Sun reporters | February 6, 2008
Legislators breathed a sigh of relief yesterday at the news that Gov. Martin O'Malley had abandoned his attempt to oust state schools chief Nancy S. Grasmick, knowing they wouldn't be forced to choose between loyalty to the governor and to constituents who had no interest in seeing the superintendent fired. Top General Assembly leaders and aides to the governor have asserted that a bill seeking to nullify her recently renewed contract would have passed, but rank-and-file members were less certain that enough legislators would have signed on to fire her at a time when Maryland schools are ranked among the nation's best.
NEWS
By Matthew Coile | April 15, 2014
Maryland home education policy needs to be updated to give it more flexibility, to the benefit of all students. Current policy requires that students take either all of their classes or none of them at public school, which means homeschool students like myself cannot enroll in the public school classes that our parents have paid for in taxes. Administrators and teachers have told me they would be glad to invite me to take classes such as biology or band at their schools, but they cannot due to current policy - policy that doesn't even make sense to them.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
Opponents of national standardization and centralized control of education could quibble with the analysis of Kalman R. Hettleman, a former member of the Baltimore School Board ("The brewing battle over the Common Core," July 14). However, it was refreshing to read the take of one "ardent fan of national standards and tests" who recognizes (1) the existence of a bipartisan, conservative-liberal coalition opposing the Common Core juggernaut, and (2) the reasonableness of at least slowing down the train to let classrooms adjust before authorities start holding students and teachers accountable for scores from the online testing.
NEWS
February 8, 2012
In what could be a preview of a campaign theme in an expected 2014 run for governor, Comptroller Peter Franchot suggested the state should return to the days when public schools didn't reopen until after Labor Day. Using his seat on the Board of Public Works as a platform, the comptroller urged the state and its 24 jurisdictions to consider the advantages of pushing the current August start of the fall semester into September. "I'm not sure why all these things began to change and why," Franchot said.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | August 22, 2006
Since Texas in 1987 first required students to pass a standardized test before being awarded a high school diploma, half the states have adopted similar requirements, with mostly successful results. Educators say the tests encourage students to take more rigorous courses and require teachers to work harder. But critics say they deny diplomas to the most disadvantaged students and force teachers to "teach to the test." "It really depends on who you ask. ... The studies go in both directions," said Kevin Carey, research and policy manager for Education Sector, a Washington think tank.
NEWS
By ST. PETERSBURG TIMES | September 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- It's not unusual for states to chafe at federal rules. But the state revolt against the federal law that filled America's classrooms with standardized tests is unprecedented. Forty-seven states are questioning, opposing or rebelling against the most sweeping education reform in a generation. In Utah, lawmakers ordered that state policy take precedence over federal policy. In Texas, educators were fined for failing to test students with learning disabilities as federal rules require.
NEWS
By Muriel Cohen and Muriel Cohen,Boston Globe | April 23, 1991
BOSTON -- New reform policies don't help children learn, their teachers do, says a new study that adds another twist to the national discussion of school reform.Classroom interaction between teacher and student has a greater influence on a youngster's academic accomplishment than complex and expensive improvement packages that promise a magic solution to school problems, the report says.Parents are advised to exercise choice, not on the broad scale of choosing schools or even school districts as advocated by some, but within the confines of a single school and to ask that their children be assigned to teachers who respect individual learning needs and styles.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
Liz Bowie usually provides balanced and informative coverage of education issues, but she presented an absurdly rosy perspective on the national Common Core standards for K-12 English and math that start kicking in this fall ("Schools hear call for more 'rigor,'" Aug. 27). To say that a "near-national consensus" has formed in support of these one-size-fits-all curricular guidelines ignores the fact that many state legislatures adopted the Common Core in an unseemly rush to qualify for federal Race to the Top largesse, without public hearings or school board votes.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
Any citizen wanting to get up to speed on the Common Core standards and why they concern so many people could learn much from reporter Krishana Davis' recent article ( "No common ground in Harford for new curriculum standards," Jan. 24). In a nutshell, here is why this rollout of national education standards is hugely problematic: Parents and teachers were never given a chance to influence the shaping and adoption of the standards. Now teachers' performance will be judged on how their students do with an unproven, one-size-fits-all system concocted by a handful of education theorists.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 29, 2013
As has long been his practice, Del. Pat McDonough, who represents Western Harford in the Maryland House of Delegates, recently made some rather prescient observations about education policy in Maryland and across the U.S. and then took the opportunity to make political hay out of a bad situation. In a letter to the editor published Friday, Del. McDonough quoted Baltimore County Superintendent Dallas Dance when he described the process by which Maryland's Common Core curriculum is being implemented: "We are building the plane as we fly it. " McDonough rightly went on to criticize Harford's neighbor county for having been the place where a critic of the Common Core was arrested for speaking out against the program during a public hearing.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
For the past two decades, schools across the country have pushed students to take high level math classes even when they aren't prepared for them. The result, says Tom Loveless  in a blog post from the Brown Center on Education Policy, is that students arrive at college believing they are ready when they are not. A study released Wednesday by the Brookings Institution's Loveless looks at Algebra II. In 1986, less than half of all 17-year-olds (44 percent) had completed Algebra II, Loveless said. By last year, three-fourths of students completed Algebra II. Despite this huge increase, scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress have not increased as would be expected.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | August 21, 2013
Baltimore city schools' academic chief will leave the district next month, city school officials confirmed Wednesday, the second key departure in a critical year that will see a transition into the most high-stakes academic climate the district has seen in decades. Sonja Santelises, who former city schools CEO Andres Alonso brought in from Boston in 2010, will head to the Washington D.C. policy group Education Trust.  Santelises, credited by many for preparing the district for a radical curriculum shift to the new Common Core standards, will join Education Trust as its vice president of K-12 Policy, Practice and Research, the district said.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 1, 2013
The following is an excerpt of comments presented earlier this week to the Harford County Board of Education and other public officials. A copy was provided for publication. On behalf of the students who attend Magnet programs at the Science and Math Academy at Aberdeen High School, the Global Studies Program/International Baccalaureate Program at Edgewood High School, and the Natural Resources and Agricultural Science Program at North Harford High School, we urge you to rescind, or at the very least postpone, your decision to impose a depot stop transportation system.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
Opponents of national standardization and centralized control of education could quibble with the analysis of Kalman R. Hettleman, a former member of the Baltimore School Board ("The brewing battle over the Common Core," July 14). However, it was refreshing to read the take of one "ardent fan of national standards and tests" who recognizes (1) the existence of a bipartisan, conservative-liberal coalition opposing the Common Core juggernaut, and (2) the reasonableness of at least slowing down the train to let classrooms adjust before authorities start holding students and teachers accountable for scores from the online testing.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
For the past two decades, schools across the country have pushed students to take high level math classes even when they aren't prepared for them. The result, says Tom Loveless  in a blog post from the Brown Center on Education Policy, is that students arrive at college believing they are ready when they are not. A study released Wednesday by the Brookings Institution's Loveless looks at Algebra II. In 1986, less than half of all 17-year-olds (44 percent) had completed Algebra II, Loveless said. By last year, three-fourths of students completed Algebra II. Despite this huge increase, scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress have not increased as would be expected.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | October 29, 2013
As has long been his practice, Del. Pat McDonough, who represents Western Harford in the Maryland House of Delegates, recently made some rather prescient observations about education policy in Maryland and across the U.S. and then took the opportunity to make political hay out of a bad situation. In a letter to the editor published Friday, Del. McDonough quoted Baltimore County Superintendent Dallas Dance when he described the process by which Maryland's Common Core curriculum is being implemented: "We are building the plane as we fly it. " McDonough rightly went on to criticize Harford's neighbor county for having been the place where a critic of the Common Core was arrested for speaking out against the program during a public hearing.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
A lawsuit alleging that Maryland's historically black colleges and universities continue to suffer from policies that promote racial segregation is now in the hands of a federal judge, six years after it was first filed. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake interrupted attorneys for both sides during the four hours of closing arguments Friday with questions and comments that gave hints at the issues she will weigh as she sorts through the six weeks of testimony and hundreds of pages of documents.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
Liz Bowie usually provides balanced and informative coverage of education issues, but she presented an absurdly rosy perspective on the national Common Core standards for K-12 English and math that start kicking in this fall ("Schools hear call for more 'rigor,'" Aug. 27). To say that a "near-national consensus" has formed in support of these one-size-fits-all curricular guidelines ignores the fact that many state legislatures adopted the Common Core in an unseemly rush to qualify for federal Race to the Top largesse, without public hearings or school board votes.
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