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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 15, 2011
Frank D. Boston Jr., a three-term delegate to the Maryland General Assembly from his native West Baltimore who lost a controversial state Senate bid in 1998, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 72. A popular legislator known for his attention to education issues, Mr. Boston went against the advice of many fellow city legislators when he challenged incumbent seven-term incumbent Clarence W. Blount for the 41st District Senate seat in 1998. The race between the erstwhile General Assembly colleagues was bitter, especially after Mr. Boston accused Mr. Blount of living in Pikesville and using his Northwest Baltimore apartment only as a mail drop.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
As the governor's race enters full force this fall, several candidates are expected to tackle education issues such as the widening achievement gap among students in Maryland's schools,  The Sun's Erin Cox reported Monday.  Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who formally entered the race last week, is scheduled to announce Monday a plan that would funnel casino money to expanding Pre-K for low-income families. According to Cox's story, which you can read here, Gansler believes the state's current model of funding half-day preschool is not family friendly, and contributes to the achievement gap between white and minority students.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green | January 17, 2013
Former State Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick will soon be back on the national stage, where she will host a handful of high-profile figures to discuss the future of public education. The longtime state education leader--who retired in 2011--will be launching a speaker series at Towson University on Thursday, Jan. 17 when she will interview renowned surgeon and neurologist Benjamin Carson and prominent research scientist Dr. Martha Denckla, the university announced in a release. The event, which starts at at 4 p.m. in Towson's West Village Commons, is free and open to the public.  The discussion with Carson and Denckla will focus on "How Students Learn: An Inside Look at Neuroscience," the university said, and will kick-off a six-part speaker series called Preparing for Public Education in the 21st Century: Signature Forums , a forum the university said is designed to provide a "unique opportunity for education stakeholders to interact with national experts.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | January 17, 2013
Former State Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick will soon be back on the national stage, where she will host a handful of high-profile figures to discuss the future of public education. The longtime state education leader--who retired in 2011--will be launching a speaker series at Towson University on Thursday, Jan. 17 when she will interview renowned surgeon and neurologist Benjamin Carson and prominent research scientist Dr. Martha Denckla, the university announced in a release. The event, which starts at at 4 p.m. in Towson's West Village Commons, is free and open to the public.  The discussion with Carson and Denckla will focus on "How Students Learn: An Inside Look at Neuroscience," the university said, and will kick-off a six-part speaker series called Preparing for Public Education in the 21st Century: Signature Forums , a forum the university said is designed to provide a "unique opportunity for education stakeholders to interact with national experts.
NEWS
October 26, 1992
Melvina Brown, Delroy Cornick, Sandra French and Linda Johnston, candidates for the Howard County Board of Education, are this month's guests on "Viewpoint," a round-table discussion program that focuses on education issues."
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Baltimore County Public Schools' Superintendent S. Dallas Dance will be the featured guest of a Newsmaker Forum sponsored by the Baltimore Sun on Thursday, Sept. 13, beginning at 7 p.m. at the new George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology, 938 York Road, Towson. The forum, which is open to the public, will be moderated by Sun Maryland Voices editor Andrew Green. The event will feature a discussion with Dance about education issues, including those central to Baltimore County Public Schools, as well as opportunities for the public to ask questions of Dance.
NEWS
November 9, 1992
Community college professor honored Linda L. Johnston, a health education professor at Howard Community College, has been named 1992 Health Educator of the Year by the Maryland Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. Ms. Johnston was chosen for her utilization of innovative learning techniques and a balanced and sequential curriculum. The group also cited her involvement in professional activities and community services at the local, state and national level.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
Leopold displayed ignorance of schools I had a chance to watch the county executive candidates' debate last Thursday and was simply amazed by state Del. John Leopold's lack of knowledge on education issues. I've been an educator for the past couple of years, and some of the points he made are just plain frightening. First, he agrees with President Bush's failed "No Child Left Behind" plan. I think we educators all realize that "No Child Left Behind" has broadened the gap in educational equality rather than fixed some of our problems.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
Liz Bowie usually provides balanced and informative coverage of education issues, but she presented an absurdly rosy perspective on the national Common Core standards for K-12 English and math that start kicking in this fall ("Schools hear call for more 'rigor,'" Aug. 27). To say that a "near-national consensus" has formed in support of these one-size-fits-all curricular guidelines ignores the fact that many state legislatures adopted the Common Core in an unseemly rush to qualify for federal Race to the Top largesse, without public hearings or school board votes.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 30, 2013
As the governor's race enters full force this fall, several candidates are expected to tackle education issues such as the widening achievement gap among students in Maryland's schools,  The Sun's Erin Cox reported Monday.  Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler, who formally entered the race last week, is scheduled to announce Monday a plan that would funnel casino money to expanding Pre-K for low-income families. According to Cox's story, which you can read here, Gansler believes the state's current model of funding half-day preschool is not family friendly, and contributes to the achievement gap between white and minority students.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Baltimore County Public Schools' Superintendent S. Dallas Dance will be the featured guest of a Newsmaker Forum sponsored by the Baltimore Sun on Thursday, Sept. 13, beginning at 7 p.m. at the new George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology, 938 York Road, Towson. The forum, which is open to the public, will be moderated by Sun Maryland Voices editor Andrew Green. The event will feature a discussion with Dance about education issues, including those central to Baltimore County Public Schools, as well as opportunities for the public to ask questions of Dance.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
Liz Bowie usually provides balanced and informative coverage of education issues, but she presented an absurdly rosy perspective on the national Common Core standards for K-12 English and math that start kicking in this fall ("Schools hear call for more 'rigor,'" Aug. 27). To say that a "near-national consensus" has formed in support of these one-size-fits-all curricular guidelines ignores the fact that many state legislatures adopted the Common Core in an unseemly rush to qualify for federal Race to the Top largesse, without public hearings or school board votes.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2012
As the General Assembly session rushes to a close, many conservative lawmakers and local officials are battling to halt a series of bills, large and small, that they say would shift decision-making power from counties to the red brick buildings of Annapolis. One measure would force counties to require sprinkler systems in all new housing. Another would make local governments levy a new fee on their citizens. Even the ethics forms of county officials would be controlled by the state under proposed legislation.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 26, 2011
Tennessee Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander caused a ripple on Capitol Hill last week by announcing he will drop out of his party's Senate leadership to pursue a more independent course, which would seem to be a break from the GOP's my-way-or-the-highway solidarity. The news that in January he will give up his No. 3 position as Republican conference chairman was particularly surprising because the two-time presidential candidate has always been a conspicuous climber. A few years ago he ran for the No. 2 spot as Senate Republican whip and missed by a single vote; he had been expected to try again, with Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, the incumbent whip, slated for retirement.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 15, 2011
Frank D. Boston Jr., a three-term delegate to the Maryland General Assembly from his native West Baltimore who lost a controversial state Senate bid in 1998, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 72. A popular legislator known for his attention to education issues, Mr. Boston went against the advice of many fellow city legislators when he challenged incumbent seven-term incumbent Clarence W. Blount for the 41st District Senate seat in 1998. The race between the erstwhile General Assembly colleagues was bitter, especially after Mr. Boston accused Mr. Blount of living in Pikesville and using his Northwest Baltimore apartment only as a mail drop.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Signs appeared in windows of the state education office building several months ago, reading "Maryland Public Schools: #1 in the nation again" after the state received Education Week's top billing for a second year in a row. But they were perhaps just window dressing, obscuring what many education observers say is the state's failure to press forward with a new agenda that other states have begun to embrace. Maryland is applying for up to $250 million from the federal Race to the Top program, which requires the state to show that it is pursuing Obama administration reforms that change teacher training and pay, promote charter schools and tackle troubled schools.
NEWS
December 20, 1990
Though somewhat clumsily, the Bush administration has partially defused the firestorm created by assistant secretary of education Michael L. Williams' unbidden charge into the realm of minority scholarships.Attempting to extinguish widespread outrage over Mr. Williams' decision to bar universities from awarding such aid, Bush operatives effectively de-activated his new policy without reversing it completely. Mr. Williams had decided that scholarships aimed solely at non-whites violate that part of the Civil Rights Act which forbids discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | June 12, 2008
WASHINGTON - Baltimore schools chief Andres Alonso and members of a newly formed coalition called yesterday for education issues to be part of the presidential campaign and urged the candidates to focus attention on the achievement gap between black students and white students. Alonso was among a half-dozen educators, politicians and civil rights activists who launched the Education Equity Project during a news conference at the National Press Club. The coalition wants educational inequities to be viewed as a civil rights issue and is calling for even more drastic changes than the major school reform efforts of the past decade.
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