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By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1995
THINK OF HIGHER and elementary-secondary education in Maryland as two highways terminating on opposite sides of a river.For years there's been sporadic ferry service. Now, at last, they're talking about building a bridge.The principal architects -- state school Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, University of Maryland Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg and Higher Education Secretary Patricia S. Florestano -- held a historic summit in Baltimore yesterday. The meeting was on Dr. Grasmick's side of the river.
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NEWS
February 25, 2013
Scientists have long known that the human mind develops most rapidly during the first five years of life, a point President Barack Obama underscored in his State of the Union address when he urged states to provide universal access to high-quality pre-kindergarten programs. Investment in early childhood education is an investment in the nation's future, and Maryland is well-positioned to heed the president's call. Children who attend high-quality, public pre-K arrive at school better equipped with the cognitive and social skills needed for learning, and there is a large body of evidence suggesting that they retain that advantage throughout their school careers and beyond.
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NEWS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | September 24, 2004
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has announced he will sign an executive order on Monday in Annapolis to create the Governor's Commission on Quality Education in Maryland. He said he plans to appoint Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele to chair the panel. The purpose of the commission is to examine issues critical to the academic achievement for all students in Maryland, the governor's office said. The commission's inaugural meeting is planned after the signing of the executive order.
NEWS
By Russell K. Snyder | March 23, 2011
I am an advocate for adequate funding for public education. I understand how important it is that our schools have the resources they need. However, I am also the leader of an organization that provides high-quality services — including mental health services — to thousands of people in this region, and I am deeply disturbed that mental health funds are being used to restore cuts to education, an area that has historically remained untouched...
NEWS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | February 16, 2005
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele is scheduled to visit Annapolis Area Christian School on Thursday to discuss the Governor's Commission on Quality Education in Maryland. As commission chair, Steele visits schools across the state, collecting information for the panel's work and meeting with educators, parents, administrators, students and community leaders. Steele has visited 12 districts so far and plans to visit at least one school in every county, as well as in Baltimore City, to complete his review.
NEWS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | February 18, 2005
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele is scheduled to visit two schools in Prince George's County -- Marlton Elementary School in Upper Marlboro on Wednesday and Nicholas Orem Middle School in Hyattsville on Thursday -- to discuss the Governor's Commission on Quality Education in Maryland. As commission chair, Steele visits schools across the state, collecting information for the panel's work and meeting with educators, parents, administrators, students and community leaders. Steele plans to visit at least one school in every county, as well as in Baltimore City, to complete his review.
NEWS
September 19, 2005
A commission appointed by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr. has come up with some interesting, though hardly new, ideas for improving education in Maryland. Asked to look at issues that affect high academic achievement, the commission has offered 30 recommendations that range from the prosaic, such as more parental and community involvement, to the provocative, such as merit pay for teachers and principals. Mr. Ehrlich has announced a meeting in November with the commission and other interested parties to continue the discussion and to further refine a legislative package that he hopes will pass muster with the General Assembly.
NEWS
August 12, 2001
IT WAS A FITTING gesture for the University of Maryland, College Park to name its physics building for John S. Toll. He has meant so much to the campus. But his impact over the decades has been far greater: No one has had more influence on the course of higher education in Maryland over the last half-century than Johnny Toll. He helped transform a "cow college" famed only for its football team into a well-regarded academic university. In 1953, he took over a moribund physics department; when he left in the mid-1960s, UM had a national reputation in physics and astronomy.
NEWS
October 16, 1991
Congratulations to Dr. Errol L. Reese on his installation as president of the University of Maryland at Baltimore. In his year as effective head of what he calls "the public institution of higher education in Maryland for educating health and human service professionals" -- physicians, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, social workers and lawyers -- he has displayed a readiness to innovate and break out of the parochialism that has isolated so many state universities...
NEWS
June 16, 1991
Name: Peter LitchkaHonored by the Carroll County Sun for: Winning first place in the grade 9-12 category of the 7th Annual Awards Program for Teaching Economics in Maryland -- sponsored by the Council on Economic Education in Maryland -- for his program "Toxic Waste in Grand Banks"Age: 40Residence; hometown: Hampstead; Niagara Falls, N.Y.Education: 1968 graduate of LaSalle High School in Niagara Falls; 1972 graduate of the State University of New York in...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
When Hank Zwally wants to do a science experiment, he climbs through a hole in his bedroom closet into an unfinished attic room where the high school senior has constructed an elaborate 10-by-12-foot cube of blue insulation. Beside the holiday decorations and the ski equipment, Zwally is trying to test a theory about global warming. When he enters the cube, the Eagle Scout can open a freezer where he is measuring the freezing and thawing cycles of sea water in two large tanks. Zwally is a science whiz, a Centennial High School senior driven since youth to solve problems in biology.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is concerned that state education officials have created a "major loophole" in the proposed regulations that would make environmental education part of every high-schooler's studies. In September, the Maryland State Board of Education voted unanimously to make environmental literacy part of the curriculum. However, it is not clear whether the vote made it a graduation requirement. The new regulation, which the board is receiving public comment on until Feb. 3, says that students must take a social studies course, a science course or an AP Environmental Science course in order to graduate.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
With concerns growing about the price of higher education, Maryland university leaders find themselves in the unusual position of encouraging students to take their initial classes not in the state system but at community colleges. Two years of community college followed by two years at a university is simply a cheaper formula — for the student and the state — than four years at a university. "If we're going to find a way to keep higher education affordable, community colleges are going to play a very significant role," says William E. Kirwan, chancellor of the state's university system.
NEWS
October 8, 2009
There are any number of good reasons why college students shouldn't spend much time watching screenings of pornographic movies on school property or reading racy sex columns in the school newspaper. But it's not the job of college administrators or state lawmakers to make those decisions for them. There may indeed be little journalistic value in "The Bed Post," a sex column that appeared in The Towerlight, Towson University's student newspaper. Aside from its questionable taste, it violated many of the standards student publications traditionally are supposed to teach aspiring young reporters and editors, such as the necessity of judging what is worthy of coverage as news and a willingness to stand behind the facts in a story.
NEWS
By Barbara Hall | June 23, 2009
Can you name the beginning solo instrument in George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue"? Identify the style of visual art called Surrealism? Draw a self-portrait and explain the "memory of place" you used in drawing it? A federal report on the state of U.S. arts education, issued last week, could help assure that Maryland students can ace these and similar questions by the time they reach eighth grade. But progress depends on a willingness by state educators, government officials and parents to view the report as a long-awaited opportunity, not merely as a data-laden critique.
NEWS
March 6, 2009
Limiting 'alcopops' helps protect teens A bill before the House of Delegates aims to block the sale of so-called alcopops, or sweetened high-alcohol beverages, in establishments with beer-only sales licenses ("'Alcopops' bill takes a beating," Feb. 25). These stores are places where kids congregate. And some studies suggest that teenagers are, by a wide margin, more familiar with these entry-level alcohol products than adults are and that at least 46 percent of all kids who drink have used alcopops.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1999
James D. Fielder Jr., former acting secretary of Maryland's economic development department, has been named vice president for administration and finance at Towson University, the university said yesterday.Fielder, who has a doctorate in higher-education administration, spent several years at Maryland's Department of Business and Economic Development, most of it as deputy to Secretary James T. Brady. He took over as acting chief when Brady resigned last year.Fielder left the department when Gov. Parris N. Glendening declined to name him permanent secretary and instead chose BT Alex.
NEWS
November 9, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for Harry Y. Wright, a Baltimore native and retired vice president and treasurer of the Fidelity and Deposit Co. of Maryland, will be offered at 10 a.m. today in the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 N. Charles St.Mr. Wright, who was 83 and lived at Roland Park Place, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital after a heart attack.He retired in 1972 as vice president and treasurer of the insurance company, where he had worked since 1924.Mr. Wright attended the University of Baltimore law school at night and was admitted to the state bar in 1932.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
JHU dean of education Fessler says he is retiring Ralph Fessler, who has led the education programs at the Johns Hopkins University over the past 25 years and is a leader in teacher education in Maryland, will retire as dean of the School of Education at the end of the academic year, the university announced yesterday. Officials said they would conduct a national search for his replacement. Fessler, 66, was hired in 1983 to take charge of the graduate division of education and held various posts related to education and training teachers for kindergarten through 12th grade.
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