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Erica L. Green | September 5, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education released Wednesday the results of a state-wide survey of  showing that motorists continue to bypass stop arms on school buses--the signs that swing out and flash when a bus stops to board students--at a "frightening rate. " A survey of roughly 63 percent of Maryland bus drivers noted 4,657 violations in April, according to a release from the department, which sponsored the survey at the recommendation of several members of the Maryland General Assembly.  In 2011, the number of violations reported was 7,000, recorded by about 65 percent of the state's bus drivers.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
The U.S. Department of Education has opened an investigation into Morgan State University's handling of a reported sexual assault, as the number of colleges nationwide facing scrutiny for their response to sexual violence allegations grows. The investigation into Morgan State was opened June 26, according to a list made public Wednesday that now includes 66 other colleges nationwide. University spokesman Clint Coleman said the investigation involves the alleged sexual assault of a female student Feb. 28, an incident that she reported to the university on March 20. "We look forward to this investigation, and all we seek is justice," Coleman said.
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NEWS
By LIZ BOWIE ... and LIZ BOWIE ...,SUN REPORTER | November 10, 2005
Michael Argentino is determined to keep the particulars of his life in order. In the morning, he makes breakfast and tidies the kitchen. He brushes his teeth and then cleans the sink. He leaves the house in spotless clothes. His proclivity for neatness hasn't always made keeping a job easy, his mother says. When his father took him to his glass shop to work, he had to quit because he couldn't bear the dirt. But at the Maryland State Department of Education, Argentino, who is 51 and has a developmental disability, found a job that matches his personality perfectly.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
The Obama administration announced Friday that it is developing new rules aimed at improving schools by focusing on the training that teachers receive before they enter the classroom - an idea that met with a mix of cautious support and questions from Maryland's leading schools of education. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said the new regulations for training programs - which could direct more federal money to high-performing colleges and universities - will be unveiled this summer and could be in place within a year.
NEWS
January 12, 1994
It is a welcome sign that the Carroll commissioners are rethinking their proposal to house the headquarters of the county's education department in portable office buildings. However, the proposal to use the old Telemecanique Inc. manufacturing plant on Bethel Road also has its drawbacks.Large, vacant industrial buildings are a scare commodity in Carroll. Commissioner Julia W. Gouge has reservations about taking the former factory off the tax rolls and converting it into a county building.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Norris P. West contributed to this article | August 9, 1995
A convicted embezzler from Baltimore who kept her past a secret and swindled $78,500 from the state education department is going back to prison -- this time to serve a two-year term for theft and forgery, prosecutors said yesterday.Rather than go to trial, Marion E. White, 42, surprised prosecutors and agreed to a plea bargain Monday. Under the deal, White pleaded guilty to two counts of felony theft and one count of forgery, according to Carolyn Henneman, deputy chief of criminal investigations for the state attorney general's office.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 1997
A month after warning Texas that it could lose federal financing if it ended affirmative-action programs in its university system, the Department of Education has reversed itself and now says that Texas and two neighboring states must comply with a year-old federal court decision banning the use of race as a factor in admissions and scholarships.The change of heart came after Texas education officials found themselves caught between conflicting Education Department and federal court directives, and after Texas political representatives in Washington had reacted furiously to what they saw as an Education Department directive to ignore a federal court order banning affirmative action.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
State education officials failed to revoke the teaching certificates of 11 convicted sex offenders and have not implemented adequate safeguards to prevent convicted criminals from working in schools, according to a legislative audit released yesterday. The audit of the Maryland Department of Education was conducted by a watchdog agency that reviews all state departments every three years. None of the 11 sex offenders was working in a Maryland public school at the time auditors learned they were still certified to teach, but some could have been working in private schools, the audit said.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
State juvenile services officials agreed yesterday to offer more educational programs at the Baltimore City Juvenile Justice Center, beginning next week. The step came after a Baltimore judge summoned them to a 2 1/2 -hour, closed-door meeting to address complaints that young offenders held in the state-run juvenile jail have not been getting their usual classroom instruction since Dec. 5. Deputy Juvenile Services Secretary Steve Moyer said youths have been getting adequate education services.
NEWS
By Daily Gazette, Schenectady, N.Y | December 12, 1991
FEWER than 1 percent of the scholarships given to college students in this country are based solely on the recipient's race, but for some reason, the Bush administration has felt a burning desire to address this non-issue.For the second year in a row, its Education Department has endorsed a ban on such scholarships, antagonizing educators, civil rights activists and minorities.But there's something strange about this year's proposal: It appears to contain so many loopholes as to render the idea of a ban virtually meaningless.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Maryland has faced several challenges in fulfilling its $250 million promise to overhaul the way it educates students and evaluates educators, the U.S. Department of Education reported Wednesday. In a report on the state's progress in reaching goals in the third year of the federal Race to the Top program, the department identified the greatest obstacles: implementing the Common Core standards, creating new teacher and principal evaluations, and building new data systems. The department assessed progress in 11 states and the District of Columbia that were among the first to sign on to Race to the Top, a $4.35 billion program created by President Barack Obama to encourage school reforms.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
The across-the-board federal spending cuts known as the sequester come at a bad time for Maryland colleges. Many usually send out financial award letters this month, but they still don't have all the details on how much federal funding they will receive for certain aid programs. And even if the Department of Education gives them firm numbers before letters go out, school officials say, Congress and the White House could reach a later deal that would involve further aid changes. "For aid officers, it's extremely frustrating to have change at the last minute," said David Horne, director of financial aid at Towson University.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Hundreds of Baltimore students and residents have had their high school completions hanging in limbo since the state transferred the General Education Development responsibilities to a new department, according to city and adult education officials. As a consequence, a program that was designed to fast-track a high school diploma for teens and adults is in some cases preventing them from having access to jobs and college enrollment, officials and students say. On Thursday, the City Council will hold a hearing to discuss the issues that city GED seekers have faced, such as an increase in wait times, since the service was moved from the state education department to the labor department in 2009.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Leonard D. Wheeler, a retired Baltimore public school educator who since 2008 had been president of the Harford County Board of Education, died Tuesday of a heart attack at his Bel Air home. He was 73. Dr. Wheeler had presided over the board's Monday evening meeting. "I am deeply saddened by the news of the unfortunate passing of Dr. Leonard D. Wheeler," said Harford County Executive David R. Craig in a statement released Thursday. "Dr. Wheeler had a distinguished career as an educator and served with distinction and integrity as a member of the Board of Education," said Mr. Craig.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | September 5, 2012
The Maryland State Department of Education released Wednesday the results of a state-wide survey of  showing that motorists continue to bypass stop arms on school buses--the signs that swing out and flash when a bus stops to board students--at a "frightening rate. " A survey of roughly 63 percent of Maryland bus drivers noted 4,657 violations in April, according to a release from the department, which sponsored the survey at the recommendation of several members of the Maryland General Assembly.  In 2011, the number of violations reported was 7,000, recorded by about 65 percent of the state's bus drivers.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Borrowers overwhelmed by private student loan debt often discover an ugly truth too late — these loans can't be discharged in bankruptcy like other types of consumer loans. A new report on private student loans by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the U.S. Department of Education suggests it may be time to change that. The agencies say these loans offer so little flexibility to struggling borrowers that Congress might consider revising the bankruptcy law given today's tough economy.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 15, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Trying to quell an angry reaction in education and civil rights circles, President Bush said yesterday that he had instructed the White House counsel to review a Department of Education decision to bar federal aid to colleges that offer scholarships designated solely for minority students."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
The Maryland State Department of Education has failed to conduct required inspections at all the day care centers in the state and hired too many temporary educators from local school systems, a legislative audit has found. The education department disagrees with many of the findings in the audit released Wednesday, which has prompted legislators to schedule a hearing Tuesday. The audit found several deficiencies in the department's operations over the past three years, but it was not found to have "serious deficiencies," according to the auditor, Bruce A. Myers.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
When you buy a house, you know the price and your monthly payment. The same with a car. But when it comes to a college education, students often don't have a clear idea of what they'll end up paying or whether one school is offering a better aid package than another. That's because there is no uniformity to financial aid award letters. Colleges use different terms and formats, making comparisons difficult. Schools don't always make a distinction between grants and loans or calculate the cost of college the same way. And letters often contain acronyms with no explanation.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
They were best buddies who didn't want to risk losing their friendship by dating, but then they took the plunge and have been together since. Wedding date: May 27, 2012 Her story: Jaime Leiner, 27, lives in Owings Mills, which is also where she grew up. She is a graphic designer at Medifast. Her father, Mark H. Leiner, is a computer scientist for theU.S. Department of Defense. Her mother, Mindy Leiner, is a teacher in the Jewish Community Center's early childhood education department.
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