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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
With its expanding population, rich base of military jobs and lack of a four-year university, Harford County is widely viewed as the next key frontier in Maryland higher education. Morgan State and Towson University want to establish satellite operations in the county. Both say they can offer unique programs that perfectly suit Harford's need for technology-savvy, business-adept graduates. Both are coveted by county leaders. Yet the two institutions, which have clashed over programs before, disagree over how the expansion should occur.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
Cascelia S. "Cici" Burgess, the Baltimore school system's director of early intervention programs and services, who was an educator in the city for 38 years, died Sept. 20 of a heart attack at her Northeast Baltimore home. She was 61. "The one thing that everybody knows is that she had an undying love for children. And as a special early ed teacher, Cici did all she could to help with resources and whatever else was needed," said Sandra A. "Sam" Means, an administrator at Maritime Industries Academy High School.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2011
After nearly 200 years, Francis Scott Key has come back to Fort McHenry. A life-sized bronze statue of the Maryland lawyer who wrote "The Star Spangled Banner" stands in the $15 million Visitor and Education Center that opens Thursday. Other elements include a film told from Key's perspective and touch-screen panels providing details about his life and views. It's a fitting tribute to man whose words help draw about 650,000 visitors a year to the site of the 1814 Battle of Baltimore at the tip of Locust Point, said Vincent Vaise, chief of interpretation for Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
With its expanding population, rich base of military jobs and lack of a four-year university, Harford County is widely viewed as the next key frontier in Maryland higher education. Morgan State and Towson University want to establish satellite operations in the county. Both say they can offer unique programs that perfectly suit Harford's need for technology-savvy, business-adept graduates. Both are coveted by county leaders. Yet the two institutions, which have clashed over programs before, disagree over how the expansion should occur.
NEWS
By Jeff Griffith | June 14, 1992
The East Middle sixth-grade band always plays "Pomp and Circumstance." This year was the band's 14th.The chorus always sings something upbeat. For the past several years, the faculty has joined the student chorus members. This year's selection was "We Can Make a Difference."Of course, the symbolic implication of the tune selection is that the students can contribute to the community. That is the fervent belief of the entire staff at the Carroll County Education Center, where graduation took place the first Friday of June, just like always.
NEWS
By Staff report | April 13, 1993
The Carroll County Education Center could get a new name tomorrow.The Board of Education is scheduled to vote on changing the name to Morgan Run School at its regular meeting tomorrow.The school serves children with special education needs that cannot be met in a regular school.Principal Robin Farinholt and several faculty and parents have wanted to change the name of the school, especially to remove the word "center."They said the word has an "institutional sound," she said.The suggested name came from a team of teachers and parents who took suggestions from the community.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
Taking cues from history, three students from the Carroll County Education Center created winning posters in the Junior American Citizen Contest.Top honors went to Patricia L. Driver, Price Hallman and Shelley A. Turner in the competition, open to all county students andsponsored by the William Winchester Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution."
NEWS
August 28, 1991
Age; residence: 37; SykesvilleSalary: $49,164Family: Husband, Bob, auto body repairman; daughters, Cassy, sophomore at Salisbury State University; Jessica, junior at Westminster High SchoolEducation: Bachelor's degree in physical education, Towson State University, 1976; master's in special education from Western Maryland College, 1986; pursuing a second master's degree in administration and supervision at WMCPrevious work experience: Physicaleducation teacher...
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1996
CROCHERON -- On a clear day, you can see the Western Shore from the finger of land called Bishops Head. The buildings across the Chesapeake rise gently on the horizon.But, like the rest of civilization, it's merely a distant shadow here in the Dorchester County marsh. This is a wild place, a place for ducks, herons, fish -- and students.The wildlife lives here, and the students can visit, thanks to the Karen Noonan Center for Environmental Education, which officially opens today.The center, a converted hunting lodge that sleeps 24, is the newest educational facility of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | May 20, 1993
TC Even though some of the participants could not speak, thei smiles said a lot.The Carroll County Education Center for children with disabilities had its annual spring program yesterday in the activities room of the Westminster school.This year's theme was "Growing Up Great," and the prekindergarten through intermediate classes performed skits about professions."We have specific units we do, and we rotate," said Robin Shamer, a music teacher who organized the program. "Whatever is the last unit is the theme for the program."
EXPLORE
December 2, 2011
Students at the Catonsville Education Center are among those from four Baltimore County public schools who will get to see a performance of "Disney's The Lion King" for free at the Hippodrome Theater Dec. 8. In addition to seeing the musical, fourth- and fifth-graders at the school on South Chapelgate Lane for children with special education needs will also participate in two related in-school workshops, thanks to Donna Wasserbach, ...
EXPLORE
July 21, 2011
WESTMINSTER - State and local officials from Carroll, Frederick and Howard community colleges are scheduled to attend a ground breaking ceremony on Monday, July 25, for the new Mount Airy College Center for Health Care Education. The center is located at 1712 Back Acre Circle in Mount Airy. The three colleges are building on an existing academic agreement to provide additional student access to workforce education programs. The center, which is expected to open in the fall 2012, will provide health-care related programs.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2011
On Baltimore's industrial southern waterfront, there's a green oasis of sorts, squeezed between a sand-and-gravel plant and a busy shipping terminal. Deer, foxes and rabbits lurk in the scrubby woods along the shore, songbirds flit among the trees, and ducks and geese ply quiet water with a distant view of the downtown skyline. Masonville Cove, long a dumping ground for building debris and scrapped ships, is being reclaimed and converted into an urban nature park and bird sanctuary.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2011
After nearly 200 years, Francis Scott Key has come back to Fort McHenry. A life-sized bronze statue of the Maryland lawyer who wrote "The Star Spangled Banner" stands in the $15 million Visitor and Education Center that opens Thursday. Other elements include a film told from Key's perspective and touch-screen panels providing details about his life and views. It's a fitting tribute to man whose words help draw about 650,000 visitors a year to the site of the 1814 Battle of Baltimore at the tip of Locust Point, said Vincent Vaise, chief of interpretation for Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
Anne Arundel County schools Superintendent Kevin Maxwell gave the Board of Education his redistricting recommendations for Fort Meade's elementary schools Wednesday. Part of the plan alleviates overcrowding by turning West Meade Elementary into an early education center. Maxwell's proposal mirrors what parents, school officials and other Fort Meade residents developed earlier this year as a way to solve school overcrowding. This issue has particular significance because the base is expecting an influx of families by the federal Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC)
NEWS
By a Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 2010
Maryland health officials are expanding their search for people who had contact with a rabid 6-week-old Jersey calf at a Prince George's County educational center. Authorities say that in addition to about 70 children who recently visited the Hard Bargain Farm Environmental Center in Accokeek, they believe that other visitors include residents of Prince George's, Charles and Montgomery counties and Washington. "Local health departments are reaching out to all known contacts who've visited the farm during this time period and we need the public's help to make sure no potential contact is missed," Dr. Katherine Feldman, chief veterinarian for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
Jennifer Henderson, who is seven months pregnant, had to decide last month whether to drive from her Glen Burnie home all the way to Harbor Hospital in Baltimore for her childbirth class or to the hospital's new education center in the Festival Plaza on Ritchie Highway.It wasn't a difficult choice.The center in Pasadena is "a lot more convenient," she said. "I really liked that it's only a couple of minutes from my house."Women such as Ms. Henderson are among the primary reasons the hospital opened the center next to the Minnesota Fabric store in the shopping center, according to Nancy Riegel, Harbor's director for suburban ambulatory services.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
The state Department of Natural Resources secretary had reason for his late arrival at Greenway Gardens yesterday."I came late on purpose in honor of how long it took us to buy this place," Dr. Torrey C. Brown said with a laugh.The $450,000 transaction took more than three years to arrange, said Bernie Wentker, regional administrator for the state's Program Open Space. And it's still not quite a done deal."The acquisition has been approved by the state Board of Public Works, pending a bond sale," said Mr. Wentker.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
For decades, medical students have been taught to treat the "standard" or "typical" patient, as if everyone reacts the same way to an illness or disease. But with the sequencing of the human genome, some medical educators have begun to adopt the view that there is no such thing as a "standard" patient and that everyone should be considered an individual with unique characteristics that influence his or her health, from age and genetic structure to their environment and place in society.
TRAVEL
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltimoresun.com | April 19, 2009
When Thomas Jefferson left the U.S. presidency 200 years ago this spring, no one needed to build a library or memorial to commemorate him. Jefferson already had a memorial in the form of Monticello, the mountaintop estate he created near Charlottesville, Va., long before he became the nation's third president in 1801. Jefferson felt so completely at home at Monticello that he almost never left the grounds from the spring of 1809 to the day he died in 1826. "I am as happy nowhere else and in no other society," he wrote in 1787, "and all my wishes end where I hope my days will end, at Monticello."
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