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By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush has seemed so willing to compromise with both liberal and conservative lawmakers to steer his education plan through Congress that critics say they fear he will end up with a bill that promises far more than it can deliver. After weeks of debate, Senate action on its version of the bill has veered out of control of Republican leaders. Democrats have diluted or eliminated most of the provisions designed to strengthen the accountability of individual public schools - including private school tuition vouchers - and have added so much more in spending that lawmakers say much of the money will never materialize.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
A freshman state senator has introduced four bills that seek to strengthen the autonomy of charter schools and boost teacher quality in public schools, including a measure that would add "ineffectiveness" as a basis for dismissing teachers. Sen. Bill Ferguson, a former teacher who served as special assistant to city schools CEO Andrés Alonso before he was elected to represent the city's 46th District in November, is co-sponsoring the legislation that mirrors recent dialogue in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - Headed toward his first confrontation with the White House since becoming Senate majority leader, Tom Daschle threatened yesterday to block final action on President Bush's education bill until Bush commits to providing billions more for school programs. "I told the president last week that it was not our desire to complete this work until we have some understanding about the degree of resources that will be made available," the South Dakota Democrat said. "So far, we've not been able to come to an agreement."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
With parents of children killed in sexual and gang attacks looking on, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed more than a half-dozen bills Tuesday increasing penalties for offenders and offering new protections for victims of such crimes. The bills were among more than 200 signed into law by the governor four weeks after the General Assembly completed its annual session, including measures intended to improve the performance of public schools, extend new job protections to correctional officers and streamline the operations of traffic courts.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | February 26, 2009
Maryland lawmakers are poised to adopt sweeping recommendations this year that eventually could lead to large funding increases for Maryland's public colleges. But critics say that now is not the time for legislators - already struggling to balance a budget swollen by mandatory education spending - to lay the foundation for other costly requirements. A House of Delegates committee will hold hearings today on a bill supported by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the legislature's fiscal leaders that would endorse a roughly $760 million blueprint for improving the quality and affordability of Maryland's colleges.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. met or bettered investment analysts' expectations yesterday with its revenue outlook for the year and also learned that a windfall from Washington is all but on the way. The sweeping $26 billion education bill that President Bush signed into law at an Ohio public school yesterday includes assistance for private tutoring for students in failing schools and teacher development - among areas served by the Baltimore-based education...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - With a joint committee yet to tackle differences in the House and Senate education bills requiring annual nationwide testing of public school students, the White House appears to be softening its stand on how strictly states should be held accountable for the performance of poor, black and Hispanic children. As governor of Texas and candidate for president, George W. Bush promoted his success in raising educational achievement for all groups of students in Texas. A key to that effort was the state's practice of not only reporting test scores by race, ethnicity and poverty level, but also penalizing schools that failed to educate at least 45 percent of each subgroup of students.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 1, 1990
Responding to calls for a better-educated work force to cope with new technologies, Congress worked on several education-related bills during the session that just ended. These three were considered to be the most significant:Vocational Education Bill: By 2000, nearly 70 percent of the nation's jobs will require a college education, according to a report by the William T. Grant Foundation's Commission on Work, Family and Citizenship. This bill, sponsored by Representative Augustus F. Hawkins, D-Calif.
NEWS
January 1, 2002
IN NEARLY 1,200 pages of rules, regulations and requirements, the new federal education bill seeks to hold schools accountable for what they teach and what kids learn. The bill makes a lot of sense for states that have lollygagged and danced around the idea of tougher standards and broad reform. But for states such as Maryland, which are several years and millions of dollars into their own performance assessment programs, the new federal rules represent a glaring and costly interference.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Baltimore's most disadvantaged children stand to benefit from a boost in federal funding that is part of the education bill approved yesterday by the House of Representatives and headed for expected passage in the Senate next week. The city school system would get a 25 percent increase in Title I dollars -- which are distributed to schools based on their concentrations of children living in poverty -- under education legislation President Bush has said will ensure that "no child in America is left behind."
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | February 26, 2009
Maryland lawmakers are poised to adopt sweeping recommendations this year that eventually could lead to large funding increases for Maryland's public colleges. But critics say that now is not the time for legislators - already struggling to balance a budget swollen by mandatory education spending - to lay the foundation for other costly requirements. A House of Delegates committee will hold hearings today on a bill supported by Gov. Martin O'Malley and the legislature's fiscal leaders that would endorse a roughly $760 million blueprint for improving the quality and affordability of Maryland's colleges.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Montgomery County senators won key changes last night to the Thornton Commission's recommendations for increased school funding, potentially clearing a major hurdle to approval of the legislation. Two Senate committees agreed to change the proposed school funding formula to give the county an extra $80 million annually within five years. Overall, the Thornton plan would go from $1.1 billion a year to almost $1.3 billion. "It certainly meets our needs," said Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. met or bettered investment analysts' expectations yesterday with its revenue outlook for the year and also learned that a windfall from Washington is all but on the way. The sweeping $26 billion education bill that President Bush signed into law at an Ohio public school yesterday includes assistance for private tutoring for students in failing schools and teacher development - among areas served by the Baltimore-based education...
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 8, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the clearest sign that he is ready to delve back into election politics and aggressively push his domestic agenda, President Bush is leaving today on a three-state tour where he will appear more as a campaigner than as a wartime leader. The trip comes on the heels of stops during the weekend in California and Oregon, where Bush sternly warned Democrats against trying to roll back his tax cut from last year and accused them of spoiling bipartisan harmony in a time of war. The president lashed out again yesterday after returning to Washington from a two-week vacation at his Texas ranch.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2002
IF YOU'RE offended by federal interference in local school affairs, get ready: The federal government is eager to tell your neighborhood school how to teach reading. Sprinkled throughout the reading provisions of the landmark education bill awaiting President Bush's signature this month are references to "scientifically based reading research." If your school district's program doesn't pass the SBRR test, you can't share in the nearly $1 billion a year in funds for reading improvement authorized by the No Child Left Behind Act. Moreover, your program will be monitored by a new "peer review panel" with the power to recommend that federal funds be withheld if you're not making "significant progress."
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | January 4, 2002
THE EDUCATION bill about to be signed by President Bush proves the old adage that after all is said and done, much more is likely to be said than done. The bill -- after fierce debate for nearly a year -- was hailed on Capitol Hill as a landmark bipartisan triumph, the most important federal school legislation since 1965. The president says it will "ensure that no child in America is left behind through historic education reforms based on real accountability ... and more funding for what works."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Nothing enraptures lawmakers in an election year like a prolonged discussion about the needs of schoolchildren, an issue that ranks sky-high in importance for voters. Last week, the Senate delved into the year's most important education bill, which would provide nearly $15 billion, most of it for impoverished students. Democrats fashioned a "war room" with a chalkboard, school desks and computers, where senators conducted online chats about education. Republicans countered with charts and news conferences inside and outside the Capitol.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Seeking an election-year agenda on education, Republicans are pushing a bill that would allow parents to set aside money in tax-deferred college savings accounts for elementary and secondary school costs, including private school tuition.A key procedural vote is set for today on the Senate measure, which would allow parents to deposit money for tuition, books, tutors and other expenses and shield the income it generates from taxes. If the legislation can surmount that hurdle, political observers say, it has a good chance of gaining congressional approval, although President Clinton is likely to veto it.Both sides acknowledge that the importance of the tuition proposal is largely symbolic.
NEWS
January 1, 2002
IN NEARLY 1,200 pages of rules, regulations and requirements, the new federal education bill seeks to hold schools accountable for what they teach and what kids learn. The bill makes a lot of sense for states that have lollygagged and danced around the idea of tougher standards and broad reform. But for states such as Maryland, which are several years and millions of dollars into their own performance assessment programs, the new federal rules represent a glaring and costly interference.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 19, 2001
Congress gave final approval yesterday to a top priority of President Bush's - a landmark bill that will require annual math and reading tests for students in grades three through eight as a way to improve America's public schools. The Senate voted 87-10 for the measure, which is intended to reduce the learning gap between students from rich and poor families and fulfill Bush's pledge that "no child will be left behind." The House overwhelmingly approved the same bill last week. The president is expected to sign the measure into law early next month, as part of a celebration to launch his agenda for his second year in office.
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