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By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | August 28, 1991
Clarence H. Du Burns, outmaneuvering several dissident board members, has secured the mayoral endorsement of the Eastside Democratic Organization, a political club he founded 23 years ago.L "I'm like Gorbachev. I beat the coup," Burns said yesterday.Burns, who is attempting an uphill comeback after his 1987 defeat at the hands of Kurt L. Schmoke, said EDO voted 52-0 Sunday to endorse him in the Sept. 12 primary.EDO's vote came just weeks after the club's executive board, which is chaired by Burns, deadlocked on the endorsement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 2005
The small Edo Sushi chain of restaurants, which started in Timonium in 1997, has ventured out of the suburbs with its latest incarnation, located in the Inner Harbor. The fourth Edo restaurant, on the second floor of Harborplace, opened in August, next to the considerably less elegant Five Guys Burgers and Fries. Like the other Edo restaurants, this one doesn't make much of an impression from the outside. But by now, the owners have proven themselves experts at taking tiny strip-mall stores and creating serene interiors that somehow seem spacious.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
If the pecking-order politics of the Eastside Democratic Organization were to prevail in Baltimore's Sept. 9 primary, City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young would easily defeat his council colleague, Pamela V. Carter, in the 12th District race. The organization has long been East Baltimore's pre-eminent political powerbroker, and the group's endorsement helps -- though does not guarantee -- a candidate's chances of winning. Both Young and Carter have long been loyal EDO members, but only one of them can win in the newly configured council district.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2005
We should all know better by now, but somehow, a sushi restaurant to most people still means a meal of prettily arranged raw fish on rice. When I asked friends recently to join me at Edo Mae Sushi, which opened about six months ago in an Owings Mills shopping center, they were skeptical. They had lived happy lives without eating raw fish, they both said, so why should they start now? But, bless their adventurous hearts, they were willing to give Edo Mae a try, especially after hearing another friend rave about Edo Mae's sister restaurants in Timonium and Owings Mills, Edo Sushi and Edo Sushi II. (Another Edo Sushi is scheduled to open in the Inner Harbor this summer.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | August 8, 1991
As he battles incumbent Kurt L. Schmoke for the Democratic mayoral nomination, many of Clarence H. Du Burns' longtime political allies are on the sidelines, or in Schmoke's camp.The Eastside Democratic Organization, a political club that Burns chairs and helped found more than 20 years ago, has yet to officially back him, adding to the difficulties he faces as the campaign winds toward the Sept. 12 primary."Things and times change," said former Councilman Nathaniel J. McFadden, a Burns protege and an EDO board member.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | September 6, 1991
Some key members of a political club that Clarence H. Du Burns helped to found are supporting Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke in Thursday's Democratic mayoral primary, saying "the traditional politics of the past must remain in the past."Schmoke was on hand yesterday in the heart of East Baltimore -- bTC a Burns political stronghold in past elections -- to accept the endorsement from several Eastside Democratic Organization board members.The endorsement is a blow to Burns' mayoral campaign because it comes from a group of people who formed the heart of his political organization in previous election campaigns.
NEWS
November 7, 2001
PAMELA V. CARTER has the necessary credentials to succeed the late Bea Gaddy on the Baltimore City Council. That's why East Baltimore's dominant political machine did her no favors by turning the selection process into a mockery. It pretended to consider 11 other candidates even after having anointed Ms. Carter in a smoke-filled room. This charade was fully in keeping with the ways the Eastside Democratic Organization operates. But it was an affront to the memory of Bea Gaddy, an advocate for the homeless and champion of the downtrodden.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2001
Homeless advocate Bea Gaddy's chair in the City Council chamber is draped in black as a solemn, mournful tribute, but the uncomfortable debate about who should take her place in that seat already has begun. Gaddy communicated her political wishes more than a week before her death to a family friend, said eldest daughter Sandra E. Briggs. Some community leaders are pushing for one of Gaddy's three daughters to go for the 2nd District seat, and Briggs hinted yesterday that she might do so. A family news conference is expected sometime after Gaddy's funeral Tuesday, possibly on Wednesday.
NEWS
February 5, 2001
EDO works hard to help revitalize East Baltimore The Sun's editorial "East-side plan pits dream against reality" (Jan. 16) grossly misinformed its readers. We would like to take this opportunity to present the truth about the role of the Eastside Democratic Organization (EDO) in the development of East Baltimore. EDO's primary objective is to empower people and create a vehicle for positive change. For more than 30 years EDO has worked with numerous churches, civic organizations, private developers, nonprofit organizations and other institutions to revitalize East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Homeless advocate Bea Gaddy's oldest daughter announced yesterday that she is seeking the City Council seat held by her mother, but she is likely to have a difficult struggle against an East Baltimore political operation that critics worry will control the succession. Sandra Elaine Fowler Briggs said yesterday that it was her mother's "dying wish" that she take the 2nd District council seat, which is to be filled by election of the council for the remainder of Gaddy's term, until 2004.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
If the pecking-order politics of the Eastside Democratic Organization were to prevail in Baltimore's Sept. 9 primary, City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young would easily defeat his council colleague, Pamela V. Carter, in the 12th District race. The organization has long been East Baltimore's pre-eminent political powerbroker, and the group's endorsement helps -- though does not guarantee -- a candidate's chances of winning. Both Young and Carter have long been loyal EDO members, but only one of them can win in the newly configured council district.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2002
Del. Hattie N. Harrison bristles at the thought that leaders of the political club she helped found 30 years ago now think she is too old and feeble for the rough-and-tumble world of electoral politics. "I'm not helpless," said Harrison, 74. "My thing is I have experience, and they need somebody down there who knows how to work for the city." The Eastside Democratic Organization's decision to leave Harrison off its ticket for the Sept. 10 primary has forced her to run against her colleagues.
NEWS
November 7, 2001
PAMELA V. CARTER has the necessary credentials to succeed the late Bea Gaddy on the Baltimore City Council. That's why East Baltimore's dominant political machine did her no favors by turning the selection process into a mockery. It pretended to consider 11 other candidates even after having anointed Ms. Carter in a smoke-filled room. This charade was fully in keeping with the ways the Eastside Democratic Organization operates. But it was an affront to the memory of Bea Gaddy, an advocate for the homeless and champion of the downtrodden.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2001
The City Council elected a member last night to replace the late Bea Gaddy, choosing from the ranks of an East Baltimore political organization that insiders say essentially dictated the choice. The official selection of Pamela V. Carter, a community activist and member of the Eastside Democratic Organization, ends a month of speculation in which the only suspense was whom the political organization would handpick for Gaddy's seat. "Thank you for having confidence in me and faith in me, and I will not let you down," Carter said in her first remarks in the City Council chamber, moments after being sworn in by Mayor Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Homeless advocate Bea Gaddy's oldest daughter announced yesterday that she is seeking the City Council seat held by her mother, but she is likely to have a difficult struggle against an East Baltimore political operation that critics worry will control the succession. Sandra Elaine Fowler Briggs said yesterday that it was her mother's "dying wish" that she take the 2nd District council seat, which is to be filled by election of the council for the remainder of Gaddy's term, until 2004.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2001
Homeless advocate Bea Gaddy's chair in the City Council chamber is draped in black as a solemn, mournful tribute, but the uncomfortable debate about who should take her place in that seat already has begun. Gaddy communicated her political wishes more than a week before her death to a family friend, said eldest daughter Sandra E. Briggs. Some community leaders are pushing for one of Gaddy's three daughters to go for the 2nd District seat, and Briggs hinted yesterday that she might do so. A family news conference is expected sometime after Gaddy's funeral Tuesday, possibly on Wednesday.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1996
Political leaders have feared the wide-open race for the 7th District congressional seat would pit East Baltimore against West and shatter the city's fragile alliances. The first evidence that may happen surfaced yesterday as Del. Clarence "Tiger" Davis kicked off his campaign for Congress.Mr. Davis, a four-term legislator from East Baltimore, found himself trying to light a fire under his supporters while trying to put out a fire over the Eastside Democratic Organization (EDO) backing a Westside candidate.
NEWS
February 5, 2001
EDO works hard to help revitalize East Baltimore The Sun's editorial "East-side plan pits dream against reality" (Jan. 16) grossly misinformed its readers. We would like to take this opportunity to present the truth about the role of the Eastside Democratic Organization (EDO) in the development of East Baltimore. EDO's primary objective is to empower people and create a vehicle for positive change. For more than 30 years EDO has worked with numerous churches, civic organizations, private developers, nonprofit organizations and other institutions to revitalize East Baltimore.
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