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Edmund Pettus Bridge

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By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 7, 1999
"I remember how vivid the sounds were as the troopers rushed toward us -- the clunk of the troopers' heavy boots, the whoops of rebel yells from the white onlookers, the clip-clop of horses' hooves hitting the hard asphalt of the highway, the voice of a woman shouting, `Get 'em!' "-- Rep. John Lewis in his memoir, "Walking with the Wind," recalling the 1965 voters' rights march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala.BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- When Rep. John Lewis, a Georgia Democrat, walks across the Edmund Pettus Bridge today, he will have a congressional delegation at his side instead of a band of civil rights protesters.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 5, 2013
Last week was bittersweet for the cause of human dignity. On one hand, the Supreme Court gave us reason for applause, striking down barriers against the full citizenship of gay men and lesbians. On the other, it gave us reason for dread, gutting the 1965 Voting Rights Act. The 5-4 decision was stunning and despicable, but not unexpected. The country has been moving in this direction for years. The act is sometimes called the crown jewel of the Civil Rights Movement, but it was even more than that, the most important piece of legislation in the cause of African-American freedom since Reconstruction.
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SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | January 19, 2012
When Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.was still fighting to make his "dream" a reality, Phillip Hunter, of Bel Air, was one of those who marched with him. Hunter was the guest speaker Monday, when Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., Xi Delta Omega chapter, in partnership with the Hosanna School Museum in Darlington, celebrated the life and legacy of Dr. King, including the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery in which Hunter participated. The observance of Dr. King's birth and the 104th anniversary of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.'s founding was made a "Day On, Not a Day Off" for those who attended.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | June 30, 2013
There is no denying that this nation has come a mighty long way since Bloody Sunday in Selma, Ala., in 1965, when marchers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, seeking the right to vote, were attacked by police and one of them, John Lewis, almost lost his life. That disgusting display of violence led to passage of the Voting Rights Act, giving the federal government oversight powers that a divided U.S. Supreme Court has said are no longer tenable. But there is much evidence, some of it cited by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in dissenting from the majority opinion in Shelby County v. Holder, that the past is not as long ago as Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. says.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | January 28, 1991
The Enoch Pratt Free Library launched its annual monthlong tribute to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. over the weekend with a fierce lecture by J. L. Chestnut Jr., who demanded that African-Americans come together as a group to solve their own problems."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 5, 2013
Last week was bittersweet for the cause of human dignity. On one hand, the Supreme Court gave us reason for applause, striking down barriers against the full citizenship of gay men and lesbians. On the other, it gave us reason for dread, gutting the 1965 Voting Rights Act. The 5-4 decision was stunning and despicable, but not unexpected. The country has been moving in this direction for years. The act is sometimes called the crown jewel of the Civil Rights Movement, but it was even more than that, the most important piece of legislation in the cause of African-American freedom since Reconstruction.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | June 30, 2013
There is no denying that this nation has come a mighty long way since Bloody Sunday in Selma, Ala., in 1965, when marchers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, seeking the right to vote, were attacked by police and one of them, John Lewis, almost lost his life. That disgusting display of violence led to passage of the Voting Rights Act, giving the federal government oversight powers that a divided U.S. Supreme Court has said are no longer tenable. But there is much evidence, some of it cited by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in dissenting from the majority opinion in Shelby County v. Holder, that the past is not as long ago as Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. says.
NEWS
By Rick Bragg and Rick Bragg,New York Times News Service | March 11, 1995
MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- The marchers came to the old man in the wheelchair, some to tell him he was forgiven, some to whisper that he could never be forgiven, not now, not a million years from now.Yet to all of the people who retraced the steps of the Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march 30 years ago, George C. Wallace offered an apology for a doomed ideal.The former Alabama governor, whose name became shorthand for much of the worst of white Southern opposition to the civil rights movement, held hands with men and women he had once held down with the power of his office.
NEWS
June 8, 2007
JIM CLARK, 84 Confronted rights marchers Former Dallas County (Ala.) Sheriff Jim Clark, whose violent confrontations with voting rights marchers in Selma in 1965 shocked the nation and gave momentum to the civil rights movement, died Monday at an Elba, Ala., nursing home after years of declining health due to a stroke and heart surgery, Hayes Funeral Home officials said. Mr. Clark was voted out of office in 1966 in large measure because of opposition from newly registered black voters, but throughout his life he maintained he had done the right thing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES | November 24, 1998
Henry Hampton, 58, an Emmy-winning documentary filmmaker whose series "Eyes on the Prize" was hailed by many critics as the definitive look at the nation's early struggle over civil rights, died Sunday in Boston.Mr. Hampton had the bone marrow disease myelodysplasia, which arose from a treatment for lung cancer. He had surgery last week to repair a hematoma in his brain, said his nephew, Jacob ben-David Zimmerman.A lifelong chronicler of the poor and the disenfranchised, Mr. Hampton began his career in 1963 as a spokesman for the Unitarian Universalist Association in Boston, a strong voice in the civil-rights movement.
EXPLORE
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | January 19, 2012
When Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.was still fighting to make his "dream" a reality, Phillip Hunter, of Bel Air, was one of those who marched with him. Hunter was the guest speaker Monday, when Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., Xi Delta Omega chapter, in partnership with the Hosanna School Museum in Darlington, celebrated the life and legacy of Dr. King, including the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery in which Hunter participated. The observance of Dr. King's birth and the 104th anniversary of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc.'s founding was made a "Day On, Not a Day Off" for those who attended.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 7, 1999
"I remember how vivid the sounds were as the troopers rushed toward us -- the clunk of the troopers' heavy boots, the whoops of rebel yells from the white onlookers, the clip-clop of horses' hooves hitting the hard asphalt of the highway, the voice of a woman shouting, `Get 'em!' "-- Rep. John Lewis in his memoir, "Walking with the Wind," recalling the 1965 voters' rights march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala.BIRMINGHAM, Ala. -- When Rep. John Lewis, a Georgia Democrat, walks across the Edmund Pettus Bridge today, he will have a congressional delegation at his side instead of a band of civil rights protesters.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | January 28, 1991
The Enoch Pratt Free Library launched its annual monthlong tribute to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. over the weekend with a fierce lecture by J. L. Chestnut Jr., who demanded that African-Americans come together as a group to solve their own problems."
NEWS
By JENNY JARVIE and JENNY JARVIE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2006
SELMA, Ala. -- James Hammonds looked stoic as he surveyed Selma's Civil War battlefield, but he could not resist a sigh: The trenches' gray planks had buckled, leaving gaps in the city's defenses. Hammonds, who came up with the idea 19 years ago of re-enacting Selma's place in Civil War history, said he fears that his town is losing another battle. Almost 141 years after a ragtag Confederate army struggled to defend Selma against Union forces, historical re-enactors canceled the Battle of Selma.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Mike Dorning and Dahleen Glanton and Mike Dorning,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 5, 2007
SELMA, Ala. -- Two of the Democratic Party's leading presidential candidates came to an emotionally evocative touchstone of the civil rights movement yesterday seeking to strengthen their bonds with black voters and tie their campaigns to the cause's unfinished work. It was the first side-by-side appearance of Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton in their 2008 presidential campaign, and the political theater of the two campaigns overlapped repeatedly, but with a polite tone that contrasted with their political skirmishing of recent weeks.
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