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Edmund Duffy

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NEWS
June 6, 2012
1931 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "An Old Struggle Still Going On" 1934 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, " California With Pride" 1937 - John W. Owens, for the body of his work in editorial cartooning 1940 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "The Outstretched Hand" 1944 - Dewey Fleming, for distinguished national reporting 1945 - Mark Watson, for international reporting from London and the war fronts in...
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NEWS
June 6, 2012
1931 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "An Old Struggle Still Going On" 1934 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, " California With Pride" 1937 - John W. Owens, for the body of his work in editorial cartooning 1940 - Edmund Duffy, for his editorial cartoon, "The Outstretched Hand" 1944 - Dewey Fleming, for distinguished national reporting 1945 - Mark Watson, for international reporting from London and the war fronts in...
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TOPIC
December 5, 1999
One of Edmund Duffy's colleagues described this great cartoonist as "a terror to the unjust ... and utter ruin to frauds." He joined The Sun in 1924 and quickly established himself as a force as formidable as a galaxy of renowned Sun writers. Duffy's bold strokes bespoke power and conviction as he confronted racism at home (long before it was fashionable) and fascism abroad.Before he left the newspaper in 1948 to take up the less taxing work of drawing for the weekly Saturday Evening Post, he drew hundreds of cartoons that were equally deserving of the recognition he received with his three Pulitzer Prize winners.
TOPIC
December 5, 1999
One of Edmund Duffy's colleagues described this great cartoonist as "a terror to the unjust ... and utter ruin to frauds." He joined The Sun in 1924 and quickly established himself as a force as formidable as a galaxy of renowned Sun writers. Duffy's bold strokes bespoke power and conviction as he confronted racism at home (long before it was fashionable) and fascism abroad.Before he left the newspaper in 1948 to take up the less taxing work of drawing for the weekly Saturday Evening Post, he drew hundreds of cartoons that were equally deserving of the recognition he received with his three Pulitzer Prize winners.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
As a copy boy at the Sun in the late 1940s, S. L. Harrison was able to observe celebrated Sun editorial cartoonist Edmund Duffy up close. His daily routine included carrying Duffy's finished cartoon to the paper's engraving room.Now an associate professor at the University of Miami (Fla.) School of Communication, the former copy boy has pursued a lifelong study of newspaper cartoonists and written widely on the subject. His most recent book is "The Editorial Art of Edmund Duffy."The 310-page book reproduces more than 250 of Duffy's most memorable and dramatic drawings.
TOPIC
December 5, 1999
A man of fierce opinions and the spirit of an iconoclast, Mike Lane's arrival on the Baltimore cartooning scene in 1972 rekindled memories of Edmund Duffy. Born in Sandy Springs, and educated at the University of Maryland and Stanford, Lane gladly gave up a business career at General Electric to earn his living with pen and brush.His outrageous expressions of outrage both provoke and exhilarate the newspaper's patrons, and keep his editors busy defending him. His political genesis was in the anti-war movements of the 1960s, an apt basis for a cartoonist's urge to protest greed, hypocrisy and inhumanity.
TOPIC
December 5, 1999
Although Richard "Moco" Yardley was a contemporary of Edmund Duffy, they might as well have lived on different planets, with Yardley inhabiting the more daft and distant of the two. Born in Baltimore in 1903, he became a hometown institution with his whimsical cartoons.He joined this newspaper in 1923 as an artist-retoucher for The Evening Sun and before the end of the decade had established himself as a backpage local cartoonist. His hilarious insights had Marylanders laughing as frequently as Duffy's angry cartoons moved them to outrage.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Stanley Harrison, a communications and writing teacher who edited a scholarly journal about H.L. Mencken, died of cardiac arrest after a stroke April 5 at the home of a friend in Miami Beach, Fla. He was 81 and lived in Florida and Woodbine. Born in East Orange, N.J., and raised in Baltimore, he graduated from City College's night school. He received a bachelor's degree in political science at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he also earned a master's. He received a doctoral degree in government and public administration from American University in Washington.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | May 18, 1997
THE SUN IS BLESSED with what some readers often curse: two lively, provocative political cartoonists. Fewer and fewer newspapers are willing to foot the bill or withstand the flak that just one cartoonist generates. Baltimoreans are more fortunate than they realize to have Mike Lane and Kevin Kallaugher puncturing pomposities and sham. These award-winning artists ably uphold the tradition of the exceptional cartoonists whose work has appeared in The Sun for more than half of its 160 years.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1997
Lisa Pollak, a reporter for The Sun, won the Pulitzer Prize yesterday for an eloquent story on the family of baseball umpire John Hirschbeck, who lost one son to a rare genetic disease and whose second son also has the disease.The award of journalism's highest honor in the feature writing category to Pollak, 27, who joined The Sun last year, was the first Pulitzer in 12 years for the newspaper and the 11th in its history, in addition to two for The Evening Sun.Pollak's story, "The Umpire's Sons," which appeared Dec. 29, recounted a family tragedy that had become a footnote in the feverish media coverage after Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar spat on Hirschbeck after a controversial call.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
As a copy boy at the Sun in the late 1940s, S. L. Harrison was able to observe celebrated Sun editorial cartoonist Edmund Duffy up close. His daily routine included carrying Duffy's finished cartoon to the paper's engraving room.Now an associate professor at the University of Miami (Fla.) School of Communication, the former copy boy has pursued a lifelong study of newspaper cartoonists and written widely on the subject. His most recent book is "The Editorial Art of Edmund Duffy."The 310-page book reproduces more than 250 of Duffy's most memorable and dramatic drawings.
NEWS
May 31, 1994
The current Matisse exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art reminded Franklin Mason, a retired Evening Sun copy reader, of the great French painter's visit to Baltimore. Under the headline ''Cultural Rumor'' The Sun editorialized on December 17, 1930, about the possibility that Matisse might immortalize Baltimore on canvas. He visited his patrons, the Cone sisters, but Baltimore remained uncelebrated in the master's style -- except in the drawing reproduced here, titled ''Charles Street Evening -- or Matisse Comes to Baltimore, with Respectful Apologies,'' by The Sun's Edmund Duffy.
TOPIC
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,Special to the Sun | December 5, 1999
"Give me a good cartoonist," H. L. Mencken once wrote, "and I can throw out half the editorial staff." Typical Mencken extravagance, no doubt, but the Bard of Baltimore had some basis for his observation.For among his colleagues at The Sun in the Twenties, Thirties and Forties were Edmund Duffy, a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner who could unmask a Ku Kluxer as a pitiful loser or portray Hitler as a strutting monster, and Richard "Moco" Yardley, whose sunny, whimsical drawings were love notes to the life and lore of Maryland.
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