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By James H. Bready | November 27, 1994
This year's H. L. Mencken Writing Award for opinion writing goes to Charles Levendosky of Casper, Wyo.The judges were Fred Hobson of the University of North Carolina, Mencken's most recent biographer; Anne Hull of the St. Petersburg Times of Florida and a current Nieman Fellow at Harvard; and Barry Saunders, columnist and editorial writer at the News and Observer in Raleigh, N.C.The winner, 58, has been editorial page editor of Wyoming's leading daily paper,...
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NEWS
November 16, 2013
I am flabbergasted and dismayed but mostly depressed by the editorial regarding 3- and 4-year-olds being removed from school because of disruptive behavior ("Pre-K suspensions make no sense," Nov. 12). I am distressed not by the actions of the school but that these children are assaulting not just other kids but their teachers! Imagine, these preschool children are assaulting their teachers! The editorial writer has the temerity to say that the behavior will not improve if they are sent home because they are the ones that need to be in school the most.
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NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | October 18, 1992
Peter Lisagor, the late respected newspaper reporter, sai once that "An old editor told me to walk down the middle of the street and shoot windows out on both sides."Editorial writers on the other hand are supposed to shoot at only one side. The trick is to guess which side needs shooting more. Choices are often less clearly right or wrong than the dummy saints and rogues who pop up in police shooting galleries.In a follow-up to earlier columns on Baltimore Sun editorial writing, let me introduce the writers choosing targets here.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
While I appreciate The Sun's attention to Baltimore City's new method of conducting photo identifications of crime suspects, the last sentence of the editorial is breathtakingly wrong ( "True identifications," Oct. 28). The fact that criminals will walk free when innocent people are jailed in their stead is called the "greatest risk of putting the wrong people behind bars. " No. The far greater crime is imprisoning someone who is innocent. That this isn't obvious to the editorial writer is truly disturbing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
Jerome G. Kelly, whose career as a reporter for The Evening Sun and editorial writer for The Sun spanned three decades, died of Alzheimer's disease yesterday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 74. A Baltimore native raised on Lafayette and Cliftmont avenues, he was a 1950 graduate of City College. He served in the Air Force as a radio traffic analyst from 1951 to 1955 in Texas and Germany. After attending what was then Baltimore Junior College, Mr. Kelly began his newspaper career as a reporter on the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette in Indiana where one of his celebrity profiles included Elvis Presley.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2001
Edgar L. Jones, who wrote thousands of editorials for The Sun and hundreds of Friday columns for The Evening Sun in a 33-year career, died of pneumonia Friday at Frederick Villa Nursing Center in Catonsville. Mr. Jones, who had dementia, was 86 and lived in Windsor Hills. In his last Evening Sun column in 1980, Mr. Jones suggested the wording of his own obituary: "In keeping the same position for more than 33 years without promotion -- or, for that matter, without demotion -- Mr. Jones lived up to an assessment made by his first editor in New York, James P. Grady, who said of him in 1940, `Jones may not be brilliant, but he's steady.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
While I appreciate The Sun's attention to Baltimore City's new method of conducting photo identifications of crime suspects, the last sentence of the editorial is breathtakingly wrong ( "True identifications," Oct. 28). The fact that criminals will walk free when innocent people are jailed in their stead is called the "greatest risk of putting the wrong people behind bars. " No. The far greater crime is imprisoning someone who is innocent. That this isn't obvious to the editorial writer is truly disturbing.
NEWS
November 16, 2013
I am flabbergasted and dismayed but mostly depressed by the editorial regarding 3- and 4-year-olds being removed from school because of disruptive behavior ("Pre-K suspensions make no sense," Nov. 12). I am distressed not by the actions of the school but that these children are assaulting not just other kids but their teachers! Imagine, these preschool children are assaulting their teachers! The editorial writer has the temerity to say that the behavior will not improve if they are sent home because they are the ones that need to be in school the most.
NEWS
By From staff reports | January 21, 1999
In Baltimore CountyFire in Towson causes roof to cave in at dry cleaning shopTOWSON -- An early-morning fire swept through a dry cleaners yesterday, causing $100,000 in damage, fire officials said.No one was injured in the blaze at Cleaner Cleaners in the 7200 block of York Road, said Baltimore County Fire Department Battalion Chief Mark Hubbard. The intense fire, which took 30 minutes to bring under control, caused the roof to cave in, he said.Yesterday's blaze was the second fire in six days at the cluster of shops that housed the cleaners and a former Baskin-Robbins shop, Hubbard said.
NEWS
March 23, 1995
FROM A question-and-answer session with Speaker Newt Gingrich at a National Newspaper Association meeting:Moderator: Did you tell a business group that if one disagrees with editorial policy, curtailing advertising could be an effective approach for change?Speaker Gingrich: Absolutely. Absolutely. What I said -- and I'll say it anywhere -- the news media is the fourth estate. It deserves to be just as carefully scrutinized, just as critically looked at. It should be held up to the same standard as politicians or judges or anybody else.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
Paul W. Wirtz, former deputy director of facilities engineering at Aberdeen Proving Ground and longtime comptroller and trustee of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died Nov. 4 from multiple organ failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former Roland Park resident was 91. "Paul was a very erudite guy and very learned. He was a world traveler until he became ill," said Andrew S. Blumberg, a member for many years of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, where he is director of public relations.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
The tragic slaying of Trayvon Martin in Florida has shown the folly of that state's "stand your ground" self defense law - and similar laws enacted or proposed in a number of other states - which your editorial writer correctly characterizes as providing a "license to kill. " However, The Sun neglects to point out that Maryland will move inevitably in the same direction if the recent federal court ruling voiding our sensible handgun permit law is upheld on appeal. Unquestionably, George Zimmerman could not have been granted a permit by the Maryland State Police and would not be permitted legally to carry a weapon on our streets.
EXPLORE
February 14, 2012
Editor: In your editorial "Let Them Eat Cake", you, Mr. Kennedy, display for the public at large your curmudgeonly nature, your abject ignorance and your vitriolic bitterness. To compare teachers who have not receive their negotiated salaries for three years to Marie Antoinette is patently offensive and repugnant. You should be ashamed of yourself. Your proclivity to use your position as editor of the only local paper in Harford County to lambast the county workers and teachers is shameful.  Have you no ethics?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 31, 2011
James Hall Bready, an Evening Sun editorial writer for more than three decades and originator of the "Books and Authors" column that was published in The Baltimore Sun for nearly 50 years, died Saturday of renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Homeland resident was 92. Mr. Bready, whose parents were staff members of the old Philadelphia Ledger, was born in Philadelphia and raised in South Jersey. He was a graduate of Woodbury High School and Moorestown Friends School, both in New Jersey.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 26, 2009
Gwinn F. Owens, a retired editor and editorial writer who made The Evening Sun's op-ed page a popular feature with readers and contributors, died of complications from dementia Sunday at College Manor nursing home in Lutherville. The longtime Ruxton resident was 87. Mr. Owens was born in Seven Oaks, England, the son of James Hamilton Owens, a veteran newspaperman, and Olga Owens, a homemaker and musician. They moved to Lutherville and later Riderwood, where he grew up, when his father was named editor of The Evening Sun in 1922.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 6, 2006
Odell M. Smith, a former reporter for The Evening Sun and The Sun who later became an assistant to Maryland Gov. J. Millard Tawes, died of complications from a broken hip Monday at Genesis ElderCare's Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. He was 98. Born in Kernersville, N.C., just east of Winston-Salem, Mr. Smith was raised in Guthrie, N.C., a Southern Railway whistle-stop. After graduating from high school, he studied journalism for three years at the University of North Carolina before dropping out during the Depression to take a job as surveyor on the Blue Ridge Parkway highway project.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
J. Pierce Fenhagen, a retired newspaper copy editor and editorial writer, died of heart failure Monday at his Wakefield, R.I., home. He was 84. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Fenhagen was the son of George Corner Fenhagen, a partner in the architectural firm of Buckler & Fenhagen, which designed the library at the Johns Hopkins University and the present City College. Mr. Fenhagen was raised in the 900 block of St. Paul St. and graduated from St. Andrew's School in Middletown, Del. He earned his bachelor's degree from Haverford College in 1939.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 16, 1991
I WROTE THAT the editorial writer who composed the "Yes, Virginia" editorial probably resented being given that chore.Lucille Ferrari of E. Rochester, N.Y., complained that I took an editorial "conveying love and joy" and "destroyed it and turned it into something sour and ugly." She has a point. At the very least my timing was bad. The column appeared in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle on Christmas day.Wells Mears of Baltimore noted that I called that editorial "the most famous and enduring ever," and asked if I knew anything about the most enduring letter to the editor ever.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2005
Jerome G. Kelly, whose career as a reporter for The Evening Sun and editorial writer for The Sun spanned three decades, died of Alzheimer's disease yesterday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 74. A Baltimore native raised on Lafayette and Cliftmont avenues, he was a 1950 graduate of City College. He served in the Air Force as a radio traffic analyst from 1951 to 1955 in Texas and Germany. After attending what was then Baltimore Junior College, Mr. Kelly began his newspaper career as a reporter on the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette in Indiana where one of his celebrity profiles included Elvis Presley.
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